16 Games Zelda Fans Should Try

These Zelda-likes will scratch your itch for exploration, deadly dungeons, and snappy combat.

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If imitation is the sincerest form of flattery, then The Legend of Zelda must be getting tired of all the compliments thrown its way over the years. With decades of games and spin-off titles to its name, Nintendo's Zelda series has had a huge influence on the industry, one that can be found in dozens of other games that run wild with familiar gameplay mechanics centered around exploration, clever secrets, and collecting a magical arsenal of weapons to move forward.

Even if you've clocked a hundred hours in Breath of the Wild or have kept a Wii U around just to play the best version of Wind Waker, these Zelda-likes from other studios are worth diving headfirst into for a fresh spin on classic gameplay formulas.

A Short Hike

A Short Hike
A Short Hike

Zelda games at their best aren't just a gripping exploration of the world around Link, but also of what you the player are capable of as you inhabit the body of the legendary hero. A Short Hike captures that idea brilliantly, boiling it down to a simple task of climbing a mountain to get a decent smartphone signal and attempting to avoid any distraction on that hike upwards. It's a deceptively simple setup that steadily becomes more complex as you ascend higher and discover a game that consistently gives back and rewards you for your effort. Low-poly visuals and endearing character interactions only sweeten the deal in this wonderful interactive metaphor about conquering your own personal mountain.

A Short Hike is available on PlayStation, Xbox, Nintendo Switch, and PC.

Read our A Short Hike review.


Anodyne

Anodyne
Anodyne

It may have cute and simple visuals, but beneath Anodyne's retro surface lies a game that shines a spotlight on the psychology of gamers and how video games can often disconnect us from the real world. Anodyne packages up those heavy themes with clever puzzles, chunky combat, and challenging boss fights, all of which was designed by a two-person team to deliver an intriguing exploration of gaming through some meta-commentary.

Anodyne is available on PlayStation, Xbox, Switch, PC, and mobile.

Read our Anodyne review.


Blossom Tales: The Sleeping King

Blossom Tales: The Sleeping King
Blossom Tales: The Sleeping King

Another entry for the pile of retro Zelda-influenced games, Blossom Tales wouldn't look out of place in an SNES library thanks to its pixelated visuals and familiar gameplay mechanics. Clearly inspired by The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past, Blossom Tales packs exploration, combat, and the quest to acquire better gear into a good-looking package. It's the new takes on familiar puzzle sequences and boss fights that elevate Blossom Tales' appeal, and if you're looking to relive the past with this colorful homage to one of the best games of all time, then Blossom Tales is an absolute joy to dive into.

Blossom Tales is available on Switch and PC.


Chicory: A Colorful Tale

Chicory: A Colorful Tale
Chicory: A Colorful Tale

Zelda-like games regularly inject a sense of pressure into their design, but Chicory: A Colorful Tale is an exception to that rule. A laidback journey across monochrome lands that can only be saved by the power of art, Chicory keeps the peril to a minimum and prefers to challenge your puzzle-solving abilities instead of your reflexes. It's a forgiving game that comes with a few emotionally hard-hitting lessons about life and meeting your heroes, but the whimsical world, heartwarming story, and adorable characters makes Chicory an unforgettable adventure.

Chicory is available on PlayStation, Switch, and PC.

Read our Chicory: A Colorful Tale review.


Darksiders series

Darksiders
Darksiders

Take beautifully designed post-apocalyptic landscapes and fantasy realms, throw in some of the coolest art direction in the industry, and mix it all up with fast-paced action, and you've got a thrilling formula that puts a stylish spin on The Legend of Zelda format. The Darksiders trilogy is a glorious ode to classic Zelda games, but it's the more action-packed focus that set these games apart. Caught between the forces of Heaven and Hell, each game has a unique flavor of combat, puzzles, and mystery to delve into, with the core three games being a pulse-pounding blast of dungeon-crawling and monster-slaying.

Read our Darksiders, Darksiders 2, and Darksiders 3 reviews.


Death's Door

Death's Door
Death's Door

One of the best games of 2021, Death's Door takes plenty of inspiration from The Legend of Zelda to craft wonderful dungeons that feel consistently rewarding as you explore them and dive deep into its tale of the ultimate end that awaits us all. Life, death, and a little bit of Soulslike attitude only add to its appeal, and with its high-quality production making the game a visual and an audio treat, it's an essential purchase for any fan of the Zelda genre.

Death's Door is available on Xbox, PlayStation, Switch, and PC.

Read our Death’s Door review.


Eastward

Eastward
Eastward

What sets Eastward apart is a focus on providing a lo-fi exploration of the post-apocalypse through the eyes of a scruffy pair of characters. Between John's ability to throw fists and Sam's budding psychic powers, the duo are a force to be reckoned with on their journey to the east, all set against a backdrop of delightful pixel art and vibrant landscapes. Combat is easy but satisfying and the puzzles aren't too much of a cerebral barrier in this charming hike at the end of the world.

Eastward is available on Switch and PC.


Genshin Impact

Genshin Impact
Genshin Impact

Genshin Impact may have been criticized for looking like a thinly disguised Breath of the Wild clone when it was first revealed, but more than a year after it first landed, the game has proven to be an entirely different experience altogether. That's not to say that you won't find some Zelda influences within its design, as it has snappy combat and labyrinthine dungeons to explore, but Genshin Impact adds enough originality to the mix with its gacha systems and a roster of unique characters to explore its world with. All that, and there's no price of admission to give it a try.

Genshin Impact is available on PlayStation, PC, and mobile

Read our Genshin Impact review.


Hob

Hob
Hob

A gorgeous Zelda-like puzzler with a sharp edge in the combat department, the real joy of Hob is the world that you'll explore. Whether you want to stick to the golden path or meander off into unknown territory, Hob's satisfying trek across a land of hidden danger plays like Zelda's Game Boy Advance adventures crossed with indie sensation Journey. It's also a brisk game that'll take around 10 hours to complete, meaning that it won't outstay its welcome, but you'll be tempted to revisit Hob again and again just to soak in that delightful atmosphere.

Hob is available on PlayStation, Switch, and PC.


Hyper Light Drifter

Hyper Light Drifter
Hyper Light Drifter

Hyper Light Drifter's world is one that you'll fall in love with once you start exploring it. The lo-fi visuals, enchanting soundtrack, and a bounty of secrets to uncover were already winning elements in its design, but the well-balanced challenge of battling clever enemies who'll send you flying if you aren't prepared makes for an intense experience. The moments of respite, of terrible beauty in a world where technology has had a devastating effect, are worth savoring in this mesmerizing title that was inspired by classic Zelda's 2D glory days.

Hyper Light Drifter is available on PlayStation, Xbox, Switch, PC, and iOS.

Read our Hyper Light Drifter review.


Immortals Fenyx Rising

Immortals Fenyx Rising
Immortals Fenyx Rising

Ubisoft's Immortals Fenyx Rising is an absolute delight to play, one that has clearly been inspired by Breath of the Wild but manages to still find its own voice in a familiar sandbox of mythical monsters and ancient gods running amok. Compared to the likes of Assassin's Creed, Immortals is a far more wholesome adventure that takes place in a colorful realm filled with dungeons, traps, and gear to collect to help you along the way. It's The Legend of Zelda with a Ubisoft twist, but it's also a well-realized game that runs like a dream and can often be snapped up for a handful of drachma on various sales.

Immortals Fenyx Rising is available on PlayStation, Xbox, Switch, and PC.

Read our Immortals Fenyx Rising review.

Nobody Saves the World

Nobody Saves the World
Nobody Saves the World

From the team behind the Guacamelee series, Nobody Saves the World is a frantic, charming, and hilarious action-RPG played from a to-down perspective. The strange world, which is saved by a character named Nobody, has a vibe that could be compared to The Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening. This dream-like world is filled with quirky characters and off-kilter story beats.

Instead of securing new gadgets as you do in Zelda, you acquire new forms. Nobody is a shapeshifter who can become a dragon, a rat, a ghost, and plenty more. Each form has its unique combat style and abilities, so you'll find yourself cycling through them on the fly to solve puzzles and defeat enemies. Nobody Saves the World has more traditional role-playing elements than the Zelda series when it comes to character progression, but the wonder of discovery is quite similar. And if you've always wanted Zelda games to be more action-packed, Nobody Saves the World is a great option thanks to its fast-paced and challenging combat.

Nobody Saves the World is available on Xbox and PC, and it's included with Game Pass.

Read our Nobody Saves the World review.


Okami HD

Okami HD
Okami HD

Plenty of games in the rove-like genre have strong art direction, but few of them boast a style so intricate or as intrinsic to the very core of the game as Okami. Originally released in 2006 and again as Okami HD in 2012, the game combines Japanese mythology and folklore with a style that merges woodcut, watercolors, and cel-shaded environments to create a living and breathing illustration to explore. All the puzzle and platform inspiration of the Zelda series can clearly be felt in Okami, and more than a decade after it was first released, it's still a vividly colorful and visually striking adventure.

Okami HD is available on Switch, PlayStation, Xbox, and PC.

Read our Okami HD review.


Sable

No Caption Provided

Games that pinch a few bits of inspiration from The Legend of Zelda usually rely on open worlds that contain some form of danger that requires a good walloping. Sable is different, as it strips its sandbox of conflict and relies on telling a story of exploration based on the strength of its visuals alone. It's a testament to the game's design that the journey is so gripping, offering a staggering amount of freedom to complete a pilgrimage through a hauntingly beautiful world. The sheer grandeur of the world of Midden and the peaceful reflection you'll uncover while traveling through it makes for a fascinating and personal odyssey in Sable.

Sable is available on Xbox and PC.

Read our Sable review.


The Swords of Ditto: Mormo's Curse

The Swords of Ditto: Mormo's Curse
The Swords of Ditto: Mormo's Curse

It's a tale as old as time, as Swords of Ditto casts you as the chosen hero who has to prepare for the return of a mighty witch who'll destroy the world unless your sword skills are sharp enough to defeat her. The only problem? You've only got four days to master the blade, and the clock is ticking. Swords of Ditto is a Zelda-like through and through, as familiar dungeons and collectible weapons echo the journey of Link. However, the catch here is you're never truly done saving the day. You're part of a cycle, rising up every century to weaken the wicked witch Mormo and save the day, and every failure has an actual impact on the world around you.

It's a good thing then that the eternal cycle is so compelling, as this adventure is one that you'll want to embark on again and again as the world changes and adapts to your greatest victories and worst defeats.

Swords of Ditto is available on PlayStation, Switch, Xbox, PC, and mobile.

Read our Swords of Ditto review.


Turnip Boy Commits Tax Evasion

Turnip Boy Commits Tax Evasion
Turnip Boy Commits Tax Evasion

While it's advisable to not avoid paying your taxes, you can live a life of fiscal freedom in Turnip Boy Commits Tax Evasion. A cute action-RPG that plays like classic Legend of Zelda but with more IRS-angering mechanics, it's a breezy and adorable take on top-down adventures all in the name of paying off Turnip Boy's massive debt.

Turnip Boy is available on Switch and PC.

Read our Turnip Boy Commits Tax Evasion review.

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