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Review

WildStar Review

  • Game release: June 3, 2014
  • Reviewed: June 26, 2014
  • PC
Aaron Sampson on Google+

The great blue-green-orange-purple-yellow yonder.

by

WildStar is a busy game. In every direction, shiny baubles and fluttering flags and swirling beacons of light compete for your attention. The world of Nexus is awash with color--or, more specifically, awash with all of the colors, many of them splashed across the screen at any given time as if by an artist determined to exhaust his entire supply of paint. Developer Carbine Studios, apparently unable to choose a single art style, squeezed multiple ones together, crafting an audiovisual potpourri that's as eclectic as the game's narrative themes. A horn-heavy tune, the kind John Williams would be proud to have written, calls out during a planetside battle, evoking Star Wars and its galactic tensions. Graceful gazelles glide across the grass while the music whispers a hint of Disney's Pocahontas soundtrack, at least when it isn't mirroring chord progressions from Peter Jackson's Lord of the Rings trilogy. Quests and regions refer to Left 4 Dead and Firefly, and your level-up notification flashes with comic-book pizzazz. In WildStar, the pop culture references flow freely down a river of science fiction and fantasy themes, each wink and nod leaping from the waters with glee.

This concoction makes for an overwrought aesthetic, and while I am occasionally struck by the gaudiness, I'm more often struck by WildStar's beauty. But even when I venture into villages swamped in kitsch, I know that I am in Nexus. The zombies and the horned snow monsters, the hoverboards and skyboats, the aloof robots and talking vegetables are all wrapped into a world that is very much its own, no matter how easy you might think it is to compare WildStar to World of Warcraft. Such a comparison is a superficial one: where Warcraft aspires to the Warhammer universe's chunky proportions and bulging architecture, WildStar details its landscapes with bright green curlicues and gray-blue bubbles to depict grass and rocks.

I beg your pardon for so quickly dissecting WildStar's looks, but my adoration of an online role-playing game is directly proportional to how much I enjoy existing in its world, and how well it encourages me to leave behind the comfort of the starting areas and set my eyes upon the more perilous regions beyond. And even when I felt the grind while chasing the game's countless missions, I still felt that tingle that came from wondering what might lie outside my current zone. Early in the game, I was enamored with the aforementioned gazelle creatures and the bucolic wilds they roamed. It was here that the Aurin race rallied around an ancient (and sentient) tree--and here that the tree fell under attack. It wasn't the locals' dialogue that made me so invested in the subsequent missions, but rather the wistful climate and the nature of great beauty spoiled by war.

Later, when I was more directly involved with the war between WildStar's two opposing player factions--the Dominion and the Exiles--I was swept away by the audiovisual barrage that did its best to veil how endless clockwork battles between non-player characters could never truly be won. But it was these grand gestures that made me aware of my purpose on Nexus, even when the commanders that poured details into my questing journal became cliche-spouting mission machines. Even at its most charming, WildStar can't always overcome monotony; I spent more time acting as a wedding planner for talking bunny rabbits than I care to reveal, and witnessing the final ceremony wasn't much reward for the tedium of searching for lost groomsmen. But even though I was immune to the allure of trinket-toting rodents, I always presumed something more intriguing would lie around the bend. And it always did.

They say the humanity is the real monster, but really, it's this guy. This is the real monster.

Suffice it to say, not every activity in WildStar is stuffed with meaning, but with such a breadth of content, it's difficult not to find appealing elements, even if you prefer to chase waypoints without paying any mind to the context. In fact, the game's fascination with visual gewgaws has parallels in the gameplay that make the quest writing almost superfluous. "Collect all the litter and activate all the objects," Carbine seems to say, more concerned with keeping you busy than with making every activity feel all that important. What those objects might be depends on the path you choose when creating your character. Paths are independent of your race and class; think of them as professions that open up different ways of interacting with the world. Scientists keep themselves busy fixing robots and scanning monsters, while adventurers leap to higher ground looking for artifacts and hidden nooks.

I'm a settler. I collect resources and use them to erect various machines and miscellany--gadgets that give you health boosts, campfires for cooking, and so forth. There's appeal in feeling like I'm gathering items for the greater good, knowing that the taxi stand I build will enable fellow Exiles to travel more efficiently, or that the vendbot I summon might help a teammate empty his pockets of useless items and pad her pocketbook. Other tasks aren't all that substantial; I run about villages lighting fires on spindly tiki torches and planting flowers to brighten up the decor in addition to my more relevant community services. Profuse scatterings of collectibles and items, each object labeled with an icon that urges you to interact with it, ensure you have lots of stuff to do, but it's undeniable busywork: interaction for the sake of interaction.

Welcome to the madness that is player-versus player.

To its great credit, WildStar makes the most vital elements--movement and combat--energetic and enjoyable. This isn't the first massively multiplayer online game to include a double jump, but it's the first such double jump that has felt so free and easy. I enjoy the basics of locomotion here, most often for the breezy animations and the overall sense that Nexus is a fine place to spread your allegorical wings. I occasionally found myself leaping into the most unusual places as I followed trails of settler resources, surprised that areas so unlikely to be traversed were still built with great care so that players wouldn't get stuck in crevasses. The primary obstacle to exploration is the world itself, which doesn't hew to a consistent set of physical rules; mild hills block your passage with invisible walls and steep inclines that look insurmountable pave the way to higher vantage points.

You needn't travel by foot. My current ride of choice is a hoverboard, though your first vehicle will be one tamed creature or another--no boring horses here. Whether you stay on foot or not, however, your travels inevitably lead you into battle. In the most basic sense, WildStar is built on the foundation that countless games have laid before it: you earn new skills as you level up, and equip those skills to a hotbar, tapping your number keys to fire off spells or bullets, or to slash away at an attacking creature's grotesque face with a set of claws.

Profuse scatterings of collectibles and items, each object labeled with an icon that urges you to interact with it, ensure you have lots of stuff to do, but it's undeniable busywork: interaction for the sake of interaction.

If the sight of a hotbar inspires within you eye-rolling assumptions that WildStar must be the same old tap-and-wait experience, take delight in knowing that this specific brand of MMOG combat is built to keep you mobile. You couldn't confuse WildStar with an action game--there's no sense that each key press results in an immediate, weighty onscreen action--but cooldowns are quick, and most skills are assigned an area of effect rather than being limited to a single target. My primary character is a spellslinger who uses her dual pistols to inflict as much damage as possible, though spellslingers aren't necessarily concerned just with cutting down the enemy; they can also act as healers. Skills typically emanate in arcs, cones, circles, and rectangles, affecting the players and creatures unlucky enough (or lucky enough) to stand within range of your fury.

Enemies telegraph their strongest attacks with similar tells, the most powerful of them requiring you to roll and leap around to avoid the red patches that designate dangerous areas. Out in the rolling hills and snow-covered meadows of Nexus, this makes for fun adventuring, whether you're on your own or tagging along with other players. You're likely to run into a few idiosyncrasies as you traverse Nexus, many of them to be found within snowy Whitevale, where bizarre enemy leash ranges can make some open-world skirmishes a hassle. (In this region, some creatures can move only a foot or two from the location to which they are leashed before the game replenishes their health bars and they hop a few steps back to their original spot.) WildStar is generally stable and feature-complete, however, and such easily fixed foibles are momentary distractions and not signals of deeper troubles.

Swamps and tundras within quick walking distance. No one could accuse WildStar of being boring to look at!


In the game's dungeons and adventure scenarios, tensions rise substantially. One dungeon boss proved problematic for my five-player party, which struggled to collect incoming green orbs before they could reach--and buff--the hulk demanding our heads. It wasn't the creature's main attacks that proved most problematic, however, but the treacherous spheroids that sometimes radiated from the beast, temporarily turning WildStar into a bullet-hell shooter. We ultimately succeeded, though only two of us were standing when the ogre finally fell.

Such battles require you to keep a close eye on enemy behavior, but the chaos is rarely overpowering, making such challenges welcome outliers in a genre rarely singled out for requiring skillful play. Cooperative levels called adventures are the most rewarding places to prove your mettle, given their creative use of ideas not often associated with MMOGs. The War of the Wilds adventure, for instance, appropriates elements of competitive arena games like League of Legends, unleashing waves of AI grunts that complicate your goal of capturing more flags than your computer-controlled rivals. You dodge out of range of a bearded abominable snowman and into a healer's green arc of healing, all while setting fire to the rampaging hordes. Adventures are fun--and more vitally, they are fun to return to again and again.

Player-versus-player battlegrounds are subject to the whims of human players, making them even more frantic than adventures and dungeons--sometimes too frantic, actually; some battles require all of your senses just to make sense of the hodgepodge of red and green arcs players paint onto the ground while attacking. These capture-the-flag and assault-and-defend variants are fortunately exciting even when the undisciplined visuals threaten anarchy, at least, and opening the caches of goodies you reap as rewards for victory often comes with the possibility of receiving some house decor for your troubles.

Click above for more WildStar images.

You will likely collect such decor even before you reach level 15, the level at which you may unlock access to your very own plot of land. Player housing is a welcome offering, a once-standard feature now often relegated to a post-release patch, if it is ever added at all. Delightfully, your home in WildStar is not just a house, but an entire floating island upon which your abode is but one element. You can plant gardens, set up healing stations, place crafting tables, and even erect a dungeon upon your island in the sky, thus making your home a useful destination and not just a virtual status symbol. Some players have used the items they purchase and collect (beds, trees, empty toilet tissue rolls, wall art, and so forth) to craft jumping puzzles upon their plots. I've approached my home as a dollhouse, taking great care to maximize its attractiveness, rotating and resizing tables and chairs as if I might be preparing a fancy tea party.

Alas, the only drink I'm serving right now is the moonshine I created by jumping up and down in a giant vat of fermented fruit. Oh WildStar, how charming and brassy you are, how loud and brazen and often irresistible you are. Your charisma has dulled over time, I'm afraid; I'm less beguiled by your thematic mishmash than I was when I started, yet there are still crannies I have yet to peek into, and I'm itching to discover what might be crammed into them. More than likely, I'll find more things to collect, more quests to take, and more outposts promising refuge. WildStar inspires compulsion, laying down trails of tasty candies that lead to even more candy trails, and in doing so, makes the case that "fun" can be a fine cornerstone around which to construct a massive adventure.

The Good
Adventures and dungeons are fun and challenging every time you play
Every region is stuffed with quests and collectibles
Combat encounters keep you mobile
Eclectic and vivid world inspires exploration
Great housing system
The Bad
Audiovisual style sometimes crosses into tacky territory
A few too many tasks feel like meaningless busywork
Some distracting combat and locomotion foibles
7
Good
About GameSpot's Reviews

About the Author

/ Staff

Kevin VanOrd has played so many massively multiplayer games that he's lost count of the exact number. He is usually drawn to pet classes, but he spent most of his 70-plus hours in WildStar as an offensive spellslinger of the Mordesh race.

Discussion

376 comments
Wintereich
Wintereich

Just picked it up, so far, I really like it. Too soon to say whether I'll be continue playing it for a long time or not, but it's good. Side note, I'm pleasantly surprised at how good the music is in this game. Definitely helps me get into it more.

Squigibow
Squigibow

I'm surprised it didn't score higher.  I am really enjoying it.  Played a lot of MMO's and I must say that this one should rank up with the best of them.  But then again, I liked WOW so I guess I am easy to please.

Porphyriaa
Porphyriaa

Wow this is a very poor review. Did he play the game for 5 hours? This game is deep and he barely touched the surface. No mention of the talent system, character progression and customization. No mention of crafting. No mention of just how surprisingly different things work in group play. For example you can tank as a stalker (rogue class) by using mobility as your main source of defense. And you can't expect to stand back as a ranged class, cast your spells and be healed. Most of the time the healer cant afford to take heals off of the tank so if you want to be healed you have to run inside the telegraphs which will usually require you to dodge damage telegraphs at the same time. 

I've been playing mmo's for 13 years and wildstar has the most intense heart racing PVE I have ever experienced. I was completely blown away by the intensity and excitement of my first boss fight. It's also the only mmo I enjoy crafting in. Without a doubt wildstar is the best mmo to come out in the last 8 years. The game is extremely well designed. The ONLY bad thing about this game is it's still pretty buggy and it has some performance issues. Carbine is a really small team for an mmo so it may take some time for them to work out the kinks but I know they will at some point. They are a great team and very involved with the player base.

Zorax99
Zorax99

WOW lore is awesome

WOW design is awesome

WOW bosses are awesome

WOW races are awesome

WOW classes are awesome

WOW nostalgia is awesome

WOW world map is awesome

WOW factions are awesome

WOW expansions are awesome

WOW presentiantion is awesome

WOW raids are awesome

WOW pvp is awesome

Thrall is awesome


So why should I spend days levelling in another wow clone?? if i already have max lvls on wow and end game is all i care.

Bryjoered07
Bryjoered07

http://www.metacritic.com/game/pc/wildstar/critic-reviews looks like he's pretty close to the average and PERSONALLY doesn't like it quite as much as some other people, so what. It's a decent MMO with good WoW-esque gameplay and the best endgame besides WoW. Will it survive as a subscription? Probably not, but I want it to.

ghostofjoemomma
ghostofjoemomma

this game is awesome F all you haters.  Go play with yourselves.

megakick
megakick

The combat looks too much like Star Wars Old Republic...

Too much like the the old for me.

Azernus
Azernus

How am I supposed decide if I want to play this game when the reviewer didn't even get to 50? For me end content is what I am interested in. This seems like poor work on Gamespots part. 

cheesemaste1988
cheesemaste1988

Kevin im so disappointed in this review. Its not even like 7 is necessarily a bad number. If you had actually played the game (past level 25) and gave it ta 7 still that would have been fine but the fact is, and you even said so in your review in progress you where busy with E3 and probably didn't even revisit the game for more than an hour or 2 before writing this review. The review in progress im assuming was supposed to have multiple updates and it didn't so its quite obvious what happened. Its even more obvious when you look at the fact that earlier on in the day (that you released this review) IGN posted theirs , which was a very comprehensive review where the reviewer had over 250 hours played time (vs your what 10 to 15 hours?), its fairly obvious that you where rushed into putting this out as to not have a review that came out a week later than IGN (which is slamming gamespot in popularity these days 10 fold just look at the alexa ratings).


Where is your journalistic integrity I am pretty sure you even had a disclaimer in the review in progress about how mmo's require a lot of time to formulate a proper review and for that reason plus e3 the review would not be out for a while. I think your a great reviewer for the most part, but this review lowers your integrity in my eyes substantially. Not playing end game content in any mmo before reviewing it (let alone not even getting close to completing the leveling content) is a travesty and you should not be allowed to write any more mmo reviews if your too lazy/busy to put in the time.


You'd think you would go a bit easier on the game knowing that you where the one that fucked up by not putting any time into it, but instead it almost seems like you took it out on the game out of frustration for not having enough time to do a proper review. You may as well have released the review when you did the review in progress because from what I can gather you played pretty much nothing since then, that way you would have been way ahead of IGN anyways, and even though you still probably would have gotten shit on its a lot better than having a month to do it and still doing nothing.


TLDR No one should take this review seriously, and no its not because 7 is necessarily a bad score its because the reviewer didn't spend the time necessary to write a proper review, he never hit level cap he never experienced any end game content, he may have experienced one dungeon and even that I am not necessarily sure of as it seems a lot of his time leveling was spent in PVP (which hardly gives you an accurate assessment on the game). The whole thing wreaks of either laziness or corporate bullshit (both really you had a month other reviewers had to cover e3 as well and they still managed to put in the time) where the review had to be released because IGN had just released theirs.

Kdwag2079
Kdwag2079

i played this game on beta, the thing that stopped me playing was the camera controls.. i hated having to hold down he right mouse button to change character direction.. elder scrolls online was sooo much better i this regard!!

dmarkonije
dmarkonije

I don't like the fact that I need to pay monthly for this game. Same with ESO. I also don't like f2p model. All MMOs should have business model like guild wars 2. Pay it once, and enjoy it. If you want to pay for extras, pay.

I also don't get how come people still play WOW. :O

PolishTank79
PolishTank79

This game is between an 8 and a 9.  I don't understand reviewers that criticize a MMO for being a MMO.  Bottom line is as of now I'm having the most fun with this one since GW2, and I'll probably end up liking it a lot more because the PvE content (especially grouping) is better and the combat is just as if not more fun.  This is the first MMO to ever get player housing right and have it available at release.  So there's the "evolution" that every gaming site cries for when reviewing an MMO.  It creates a perfect gold sync for the economy without feeling cheap. 


Seriously anyone who's been away from the MMO scene for a while but wouldn't mind getting back in will love this.  It brings back just enough "nostalgia" with new flushed out features to make it fresh/new at the same time.

cpuchess
cpuchess

I really like this game but the KB+M controls are killing me, it's so awkward and I am always hitting the wrong keys. I probably won't keep my subscription beyond the 30 days because of it. Why on earth didn't they at least add partial controller support, even if it's to move the guy around and shoot a couple of your weapons. I know I could use Xpadder but that always seems clunky...

Scruffin_it
Scruffin_it

Looks like WildStar didn't pay GameSpot enough in advertising for a full review. You would think when reviewing a game you would play it entirely, especially an MMO so you can inform people of end-game content. Instead you write a half-ass article and wasted a month to say you are doing something. That is just like any other "Senior" position at any other job. Maybe you could be more of a role model to the other reviewers and write a decent review on this game since it is supposed to be a big hit. 


MetaCritic right now shows GameSpot giving WildStar the worst rating from professional critics it is also one of the reviews that hasn't actually hit level 50 and has errors in it. 


Do a decent job and be respectful to your readers, for all I know, you guys are biased towards WoW or might have been paid out from Blizzard based on your crappy review. I can't wait to see the review for it and how high it will be. 

Urizen316
Urizen316

I can't get past how horrible VanOrd's pronunciation sounds.

xSagez
xSagez

I can't get past how hideous this game looks.

leonelkins
leonelkins

Kevin really hadn't experienced anything in the game, he barely touched it and didn't even get to max level, or even know the game well enough to know when you get housing. His review can be semi-accurate, but he honestly has not played the game enough to know the very basics let alone write a review about it. 


I am very disappointed in this review because it was not very good quality. Kevin had very limited experience in the game, did not even play the other faction, other classes, or really level at all. It is mind boggling how someone who has barely touched the game is allowed to write a review about its entirety.


The score could be potentially lower or higher if Kevin had actually  taken his time to play the game before pretending to know the game in his review.


Kevin's review also came off as abrasive and unprofessional, and I, personally, hope to never hear a review from him again.


I personally do not care much about the score, I would of preferred if the score was persay a 5, if the reviewer actually played the game. This was just brutally disappointing as it was quite the wait for the review.

razrabbit
razrabbit

I love this game, and I think this is a very fair review.  :)


"Loud and brazen and irresistable with trails of tasty candy leading you everywhere"  is a perfect description. 

Its quite a shock to step into an MMO that doesn't take itself seriously, and gleefully throws all its cards on the table right up front.


However, this is also why its not going to be for everyone.  Not everyone wants a land of zany watercolor from a drug induced fever dream everywhere.

The art style is very...  odd, and takes some getting used to.  


Also, the 'traditional' MMO stuff it does is still a little rough and creaky, and needs to be more fine tuned.


It does its own brand of crazyness very well, but in thier quest to set it apart from other MMOs, the 'boring' stuff that people expect to see any MMO get right automatically has gotten ignored or halfassed, 

Its still a work in progress, but they've got my $15 next month so far.




goettel
goettel

Just to correct: housing is at level 14, not level 15.

Otherwise it's a reasonable overview of the game, just missing the obvious conclusion that it's an absolute blast to play.

Maybe not GOTY, but definitely MMO of the year. See you in the world!

wowmar
wowmar

Pffft..

Sorry but you have to wonder where and when he played. Well PICK the server where there are no bots. You can not even craft anymore. SOME people just say do it at your house but not sure about you but I didnt PAY for just that. 

The same thing happened with ElderScrolls and we all know that never got fixed. 

So any new player that gets to level 10 and then wants to craft will have a night mar of a time. Dont let anyone tell you "not on my server or ZONE". Go for it post the server where at level 10 you can mine or get trees or relics all you want :) cant.

So you if you are playing you are PAYING to let bots..bots meaning real people using hacks to teleport, speed hacks and the like to steal and make real money by doing nothing but nodes. See they sell to vendor..they make 10gold from just 250 (one stack). Do the math if you fill all your bags. This is not wrong. Its the TELEPORTING. Thats BOTS and there are thousands of them. Again pick the server where there are none. I cant find one.


So I guess he just missed crafting if so them great review. But please let people know what they are in for before they spend THERE money.

Konuvis
Konuvis

I played it a bit during the beta and while the world is beautiful and fun my biggest gripe was with the UI. It's hard to distinguish things like quest receivers and made me more aware of the framework as opposed to letting me get immersed in the world.


As a result when the open beta came rolling I didn't really care anymore. This is for me the perfect example of a game I'm not willing to drop a sub on. If it were F2P I may have continued playing it a bit to see how it develops in the higher levels but as it stands if I'm going to dedicate my gaming time to an MMO I'd rather get back to WoW to finish some stuff up, or get back to Secret World which has a deeply immersive world and very original setting and quests.

notorious1234na
notorious1234na

@Porphyriaa


dude u dodge circles yeah OK 


you guys seriously need to stop playing mmos and imo getting ridiculous now what you guys consider to be true action combat.

Squigibow
Squigibow

@Zorax99 I really like WOW as well.  I am playing Wildstar and it is actually a lot of fun. Pretty immersive as well.  I will be getting and playing the new WOW expansion day 1.  So many fun games and so little time to play them all for this working stiff.  I guess there will be plenty of late nights ahead.

Porphyriaa
Porphyriaa

@Zorax99 WoW is for people who want to roll their face on their keyboard to get to cap level and epic gear spoon fed to them. Wildstar is actually challenging. You can die questing. You can die in adventures. You WILL die in dungeons. So basically if you like WoW the way it is right now you will cry if you play wildstar. Way too difficult for WoW players.

Pikdum
Pikdum

@Zorax99  Just discovered WoW, kid? Most of the WoW player base that was there during launch no longer plays the game. We're sick of it. This game is an attempt to appeal to that crowd and I'll say they did a pretty good job.

Pikdum
Pikdum

@megakick I played the beta, ToR was tab target where this is not. I actually really liked the combat system in this.

ghostofjoemomma
ghostofjoemomma

@megakick Nothing like it.  In Wildstar you have to actually aim and follow your target around, also watch out for their telegraphs you get caught standing in one and you're dead.  It can be a bit more challenging so if you like to stand there and just face roll your keyboard then keep playing games like SWTOR and WOW.

Porphyriaa
Porphyriaa

@cheesemaste1988 What do you expect from gamespot? I haven't been on the site in months because all their "critics" have become so incredibly unprofessional. First time I come here in months and just another reassurance that I made the right choice in moving to other gaming websites.

ghostofjoemomma
ghostofjoemomma

@Kdwag2079 LMAO the Q and E do that for you.  It makes the combat a whole lot better imo.  A and D will move left and right and Q and E moves your camera view so you can aim your spells.  ESO's combat is way different you don't have to aim spells in most games.  All you do is stand there and hit the keys.  So you just like the simplistic style of ESO's combat. 

chunkbasker
chunkbasker

@Kdwag2079 Sad that Eso is such a terrible game still in retrospect.  They've insulted their gamers heavily through the process of that game and the fanboys just bend over to take it more.  I meen who releases a duping bug that was found by beta testers and reported in live edition? 


That right there lost me respect for Eso period.

ghostofjoemomma
ghostofjoemomma

@xSagez then don't play it numb nuts.  derp derp. no one is forcing you to play the game or even look up a review on the game.  you and the people who came here to hate on a game should win this years darwin award.

AzatiS
AzatiS

@leonelkins

" Kevin really hadn't experienced anything in the game, he barely touched it and didn't even get to max level, or even know the game well enough to know when you get housing. His review can be semi-accurate, but he honestly has not played the game enough to know the very basics let alone write a review about it. ""

That was exactly my thought when i read his preview and thats what i said .... I said that was to early to jump into conclusions if game is good or not since End game content >>> level up experience.

It seems he didnt experience any high end game let alone serious raiding ( when Wildstar big gun is all about end game raiding ).

hippystank
hippystank

@wowmar A. You can put crafting stations on your housing unit like you said, B. How can you not craft? I've lvled 2 characters past 15 one to 35 at this point and haven't had any trouble at all with crafting.


If you are having a hard time finding nodes for crafting consider getting a guild, asking for neighbors with nodes on their land that do 50/50 sharing and never worry about it again..

I'm not saying that botting isn't a problem but its not anywhere near as bad as it was on launch, game hasn't even been out a month yet if you don't count the headstart, if after 2 months the issue hasn't been fixed then there's reason for concern but you gotta give them time to at least try to deal with it.


Also don't forget the reason these bots exist is because people will buy gold, if people would stop using these services the bots wouldn't have a reason to exist...Who you should be upset with is the end user buying gold from botters and jacking up credd prices/market prices....Thats BS.

goettel
goettel

@wowmar Well, here goes: I'm 30 levels in on my main and doing a lot of gathering, and I've seen one (count 'em: 1) bot, in Wildvale. Contagion EU. Fact.

goettel
goettel

@Konuvis The beta UI is long gone and much improved. Sure, the quest logging/interface is still primitive, but there's tons of addons available to get something good going.

Porphyriaa
Porphyriaa

@AzatiS I honestly wouldn't be surprised if he didn't even play the game at all. This review is literally like reading the back of the game's box. He says absolutely nothing I didn't already know about wildstar years before launch.

Konuvis
Konuvis

@goettel The weekend beta when I tried the game was right after the UI redesign. I know there's a bunch of addons but I need motivation to delve into tweaking and I don't really have it for this game.

Porphyriaa
Porphyriaa

@Zorax99 @Porphyriaa I played wow for 5 years. I've done countless heroics and several raids. Wildstar difficulty makes wow look like a complete joke. The dungeons in wildstar are on par with wows raid difficulty. Even questing in wildstar is more difficult than wow's dungeons. Also "difficulty" in wow is heavily based on your gear and very little skill based. Wildstar is heavily skill based and low gear based. You can have amazing gear in wildstar and still get your ass handed to you if you arent dodging every telegraph.

Zorax99
Zorax99

@Porphyriaa @Zorax99 and there arent hard mmos, each one of them plays different it is just a matter of being good at it or bad at it...

Zorax99
Zorax99

@Porphyriaa @Zorax99 bro,u are being a real fanboy right now i have played some wildstar with that esper class and its as easy as any mmo, just the fact that some abillities are skill shots doesnt make it difficult.And saying dat dungeons in ws are as diificult as raids in wow u are being silly,imagine if it was? that would be a huge ton of wipes just like any pug in wow since wotk and that would be a pain in the ass for some players and this mmo would die soon ( as i think it will bc of the poor presentation).there is no skill in mmos man just fast fingers and gear griding,and i really like gear griding in wow raids bc they are awesome.

When i played ws it wasnt skill based, it was finger based as i said.

Porphyriaa
Porphyriaa

@Zorax99 @Porphyriaa You never got past level 15 did you. The game starts out as easy as any mmo but starts getting serious around lvl 18 where you can die questing if you aren't on your toes. Literally everyones first dungeon experienced 10-20 wipes at least. They are as hard as wow's raids and yes people cry about it and unsubscribe. Doesn't mean the game is going to fail, it just means it's for hardcore players that enjoy a real challenge. 

I'm not a fanboy I'm simply being a realist here. It's quite obvious you haven't actually played this game for more than a few hours. Anyone who isn't biased will tell you wildstar is without a doubt the most skill oriented mmo on the market by a long shot. No other mmo requires you to constantly dodge telegraphs while still finding room to execute your abilities. Seriously though, play a dungeon in wildstar and your entire opinion of the game will change. You have no idea what wildstar is about until you've played the first dungeon.

WildStar More Info

First Release on Jun 03, 2014
  • PC
WildStar is an massively multiplayer online adventure game where you make your mark as an explorer, soldier, scientist, or settler and lay claim to a mysterious planet on the edge of known space.
8.6
Average User RatingOut of 97 User Ratings
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Developed by:
Carbine Studios
Published by:
NCSOFT
Genres:
MMO, Role-Playing
Content is generally suitable for ages 13 and up. May contain violence, suggestive themes, crude humor, minimal blood, simulated gambling and/or infrequent use of strong language.
Teen
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