Play
Please use a flash video capable browser to watch videos.
00:00:00
Sorry, but you can't access this content!
Please enter your date of birth to view this video

By clicking 'enter', you agree to GameSpot's
Terms of Use and Privacy Policy

Review

Star Wars: The Old Republic Review

  • First Released
  • Reviewed:
  • PC

Star Wars: The Old Republic isn't the next step in online role-playing games. Instead, it's a highly entertaining refinement of what has come before it.

As the opening crawl of each film reminds us, the spacefaring Star Wars tales we know and love don't occur in the far-flung future but, rather, in the distant past. It's appropriate, then, that Star Wars: The Old Republic does not represent the future of online role-playing games but a refinement of what has preceded it. Instead of opening a wormhole into an unknown dimension, BioWare has remained in the local galaxy, taking proven game mechanics and heightening them with the branching narrative and overall structure that have characterized the developer's output for many a year now. The result is an enjoyable massively multiplayer online game with knockout production values. The Old Republic's foundation is somewhat ordinary; what makes it great are the fine details that gild its edges.

Many of those details should be familiar to anyone that's played a BioWare game in recent years, such as Mass Effect or Dragon Age II. However, The Old Republic owes less to past BioWare successes (including the related single-player role-playing game, Star Wars: Knights of the Old Republic) than it does to the MMOGs that have come before. In fact, the license and a few other elements aside, the first hours of the game might have you thinking: "I've already played this game." You select from a number of humanoid races, none of which seems particularly unusual, given the breadth of unusual creatures to be found in Star Wars lore. You then choose a faction (Sith Empire or Galactic Republic) and one of eight classes (and after the starting area, an advanced class).

The familiarity continues as you make your way through your class's opening area. You take some missions and kill some creatures using the game's straightforward hotkey combat system, all while a bunch of other people do the same thing. Where Star Wars: The Old Republic tries to stand out in this early stage is with its fully voiced character interactions. Other MMOGs have featured plenty of voice acting (EverQuest II, for example), but not to this extent. In The Old Republic, your interactions play out much as they do in BioWare's single-player games: in oft-lengthy cutscenes in which you respond to others using a dialogue wheel. The three options for even the most minor of conversations are of the usual "kind," "neutral," and "mean" classifications.

Of course, such a description isn't exact, but it's the general gist--at least, as far as standard interactions are concerned. In many cases, these decisions are all smoke and mirrors: a way of playing your chosen moral role but ultimately leading to the same conclusion. Other times (far fewer times), you face decisions that have impact, and the "good" decision might bring you closer to the light side of the Force, while the "mean" might align you with the dark side. A previous ally has been exposed as a traitor; do you kill her or allow her to live? If you show mercy, you earn light side points, which affects your moral alignment. But if you sink your lightsaber into her flesh, you earn dark side points. Your light side/dark side level determines access to certain gear. When you reach a certain tier, you might then use a weapon previously unavailable to you.

Sabers, sabers everywhere!

The downside to this morality system is that there's little mechanical benefit to staying neutral. If you stay morally ambiguous, your rewards are fewer and less diverse. You may find yourself choosing the light or dark option for the sake of that blaster you want, rather than following the code of your convictions. Yet, your choices don't just have practical implications; there are narrative ones as well. Some are relatively minor. That traitorous ally? If you kill her, your vengeance will be noted in conversation at a later date. If you overlook her transgressions, she might send you gifts to show her gratitude. Some have more dramatic repercussions. A Sith lord gone rogue needs to be put in line. You might send him a warning by killing his son or spare the offspring and kill his duplicitous dad. The implications aren't always major in the broad scheme of things. Even so, they make you feel as if you have power over your own adventure, though not over the world you inhabit.

How involved you feel with the plot depends in part on what class you choose. The Jedi knight tale is plain enough that some long conversations feel more like filler than necessary plot or character development. The terrorist conspiracy driving the Imperial agent story, on the other hand, is far more complex and compelling. Even then, some of the writing falls flat, with much of it coming across as what an author might write on a page, but not what a living being would say. But all of that voice acting goes a long way toward making the characters come alive onscreen. Almost all of it is high quality, with the actors making even the most stilted dialogue brim with character. Even the shortest line readings, such as your companions' battlefield quips, are loaded with personality.

Ah, yes--companions. You've seen this structure in BioWare games already: You amass a crew on your spaceship, which functions as a central hub, and then take one into the fray when you reach planetside. But companions are more than combat pets, though they are certainly effective in that role. They also figure into the story, which makes you far more invested in whomever you summon to your side than you would expect. In fact, your teammates enrich almost every aspect of your virtual life in one manner or another. Equipping new gear is a treat in any RPG; maintaining your crew's equipment, as well as your own, enhances the joys of progression. Combat is better, too. Because you get to know your companions outside of battle, it's like having a real individual at your side rather than a disposable henchman. You can even send your crew members off on gathering missions, have them craft equipment for you, and sell your vendor trash. These conveniences keep the pace moving. BioWare clearly thinks your time is better spent swinging sabers and firing blasters--not mining crystals and scavenging for droid parts. You can still do these things, but they aren't likely to occupy much of your time.

This is not the Jawa you're looking for.

Of course, this is an online game, so AI companions aren't the only individuals you have at your side. When playing with others, you participate in conversations as a group, earning a currency called social points as a reward for consistent responses. You need to be with guildmates or other players to conquer heroic quests, which might require a full party of four. Heroic areas offer a nice difficulty curve. You could steamroll through earlier ones, only to find your party must make good use of crowd-control skills and heals later on. You can also join others for four-person dungeons called flashpoints, which give you a chance to exercise the power of choice as a group. Do you overload power conduits, distracting enemy forces but risking innocent lives? Or do you disable them and keep losses to a minimum? Either way, flashpoints are a lot of fun, and they too offer a wonderful difficulty curve. Early skirmishes might be easy enough to handle. Facing a boss that leaps about the room while turrets pelt you with lasers is a greater challenge. It's also an enjoyable one, particularly if you've got a good tank to absorb all of that turret fire. Prefer something a little more epic? Then you should enjoy the eight-man and 16-man dungeons called Operations.

Of course, you might be seeking conflict with other players, though The Old Republic is not the richest online game in this regard. Consensual player-versus-player conflicts come down to the usual one-on-one duels and the three PVP maps currently in rotation. The most unusual of these is Huttball, in which each team attempts to score by passing the ball from player to player until someone runs it across the opposing team's goal. All this time, you run about, bashing and shooting each other in an effort to maim and kill, which can get pleasantly hectic. All three maps require teamwork, but if you prefer one map to another, that's too bad because you can't queue up for the match type you prefer. There's no matchmaking either: Player levels are all evened out, so you face high-level players long before you reach their skill levels. But don't let this dissuade you from playing these maps; it's all beautiful madness, characterized by the flashes of lightsabers and frantic key tapping.

MMOG veterans should note that Star Wars: The Old Republic isn't a sandbox in the way of Star Wars Galaxies; it's a more guided experience, featuring planets that feel more like large levels than vast continents waiting to be explored. The sense of linearity is most notable on planets like Coruscant and Nar Shaddaa, where you trot down corridor after corridor. To be fair, the sights of shiny towering structures in the distance and skyways busy with rushing vehicles convey the sense of a grand world beyond your understanding. Even planets that offer more breathing room, like Balmorra, funnel you down valleys and force you to kill time waiting for elevators. (And waiting for elevators is something you do far too often in The Old Republic.)

Open planets like Alderaan and Tatooine are refreshing treats because they feel more like lands of untold mysteries than big collections of hallways. The downside to the vaster areas is that they can feel remarkably empty. Even on the most heavily populated servers, it's possible to go for extended periods without seeing another player. Each planet might also be split into multiple instances, which thins out the population and exacerbates the loneliness. Fortunately, if you aren't with friends and want to jump into a heroic area, a call out for help in the general chat is all it takes to have a comrade at your side.

Alone or with others, combat is snazzy enough for you to remain entertained. Short ability cooldowns and the absence of an auto-attack get your fingers busy, while spirited animations and stirring sound effects make combat a pleasure. Not that the action is mechanically unusual: it boils down to the traditional hotkey presses/hotbar clicks that have long characterized the genre. But it remains consistently exciting once your hotbars fill up with a variety of skills. The vivid glow of lightsabers flashes across the screen, Jedi knights leap about like robed acrobats, and combat droids fire bright lasers as they swoop and whir around you.

It's hot out herrre.

In fact, Star Wars: The Old Republic deserves kudos for its excellent sound design. That is due in part to the evocative audio associated with the franchise; after all, the drone of a lightsaber is immediately recognizable. There are other iconic audio cues, too, such as the exhausted whine of a forcefield as it powers down. But The Old Republic does more than rely on the old standbys: it elevates them. The thwap of a bounty hunter firing his pistol and the electric buzz of lightning flowing from a sorcerer's fingertips are but a few of the many superb examples of effects that heighten the action. Even the hums of lightsabers retain their edge. The various attacks vary in musical pitch, and they are broken up by other sounds, like the violent crunch of the sentinel's pommel strike. The soundtrack follows suit, mixing new tracks with old and reimagined music from various Star Wars films and games. Tatooine's ambient soundtrack will have you recalling Luke's wistful gaze toward the twin suns. The tranquil tones that purr throughout Alderaan's grasslands aren't so familiar, but they are no less impressive for it.

The visuals join the audio to make for a striking presentation that captures the Star Wars universe. That doesn't mean that The Old Republic sets new standards for graphics engines. Facial features are flat, hair looks more like glued-on plastic than actual hair, and textures are plain. So don't come to the game looking to show off the capabilities of your fancy new video card. But The Old Republic was built to look good on as many computers as possible--even those that aren't state of the art.

And it does look good. The Galactic Senate on Coruscant looks stolid and imposing behind the soft blue lights that rise into the nearby sky. On Nar Shaddaa, you glimpse neon silhouettes of exotic dancers on the taxi ride to the red light sector, which is a great visual element that betrays the seediness of the neighborhood. The diverse locations look uniformly attractive, from the rolling sands of Tatooine to the craggy mountains of Balmorra. Attention to visual details goes a long way toward making these feel like lived-in places. Quest givers don't just stand around: they crouch behind boulders, bandage an injured soldier's arm, and bend over computer terminals. Enemies tinker with speeders and lean against walls as if relaxing for a spell. How disappointing that other details common to online RPGs, such as weather effects and a day/night cycle, didn't make the cut.

The Old Republic: Transcending space, but not time.

The Star Wars-iness of the production carries over into The Old Republic's space battles. You access space missions from your ship's console, though these aren't massive PVP space battles or even cooperative missions for a small party. Instead, they are solo minigames: shallow affairs in which you don't get full control of your ship. Like in the Star Fox series, such battles are on rails; the game guides your ship through the levels, and you shoot lasers and missiles at fighters and turrets. Space missions are a good way to earn extra experience and credits, and the bright explosions and enthusiastic voice-overs make for some simple fun--at first. But the battles are so easy--and there are so few of them--that they lose their appeal. Considering what the previous Star Wars MMOG accomplished in regards to space combat (albeit, not at launch), this element is a missed opportunity.

The disappointment of space combat, like most of Star Wars: The Old Republic's minor disappointments, is one of scope and originality, as opposed to its level of refinement. 2011's Rift proved once and for all that there is no reason a modern MMOG shouldn't be able to launch in a stable, feature-complete state. The Old Republic follows Rift's lead: It's lag free and delivers a smooth playing experience. It isn't free of the occasional bug or annoyance, however. Galactic market (read: auction house) sort options don't work as they should. A group of sand people may not behave properly or a quest may not complete as intended. You also can't customize the interface: Hotbars can't be moved around and macros aren't yet supported. But rarely does a technological or mechanical failure interfere with progress. There's always something to do, and it almost always works as intended. And most importantly, it's usually fun.

Nothing like a heroic quest to make you feel like, well, a hero.

And ultimately, that's what Star Wars: The Old Republic delivers to make it so compelling: a lot of fun. Don't come to it seeking the next online revolution. In fact, when you heard that the developers of Mass Effect were making an MMOG, this is the one you probably predicted: a prototypical online game with the standard BioWare trappings layered on top of them. The surprises are few, but The Old Republic is nonetheless an online RPG of uncommon quality. And with a broad, overarching story to guide you through, you might even reach maximum level with a smile on your face, even if you are one to abandon an MMOG before that point. Such is the power of a beloved universe with so many tales still left to tell.

The Good
Outstanding production values capture the vibe of the Star Wars universe
Companions add depth both to the story and to the gameplay
Combat is exciting to watch and hear
Eight fully voiced, branching stories give you a good reason to reach level 50
Crew skills keep things moving by automating gathering and selling
The Bad
Instancing can make open areas feel empty
Frequent, uninspired corridor levels
Shallow space combat is a missed opportunity
8
Great
About GameSpot's Reviews
Other Platform Reviews for Star Wars: The Old Republic

About the Author

GameSpot senior editor Kevin VanOrd has a cat named Ollie who refuses to play Rock Band because he always gets stuck pla

Discussion

359 comments
cgobeil
cgobeil

I'm back in SWTOR because of the strongholds and Revan, (after a few years without playing it), I must admit:  the game is a lot better than when it first launched...  Heck, I might even resub!  :P

Etagloc
Etagloc

play this game for >1 month.. (week one)...OMFG YES THIS IS AMAZING (week two) hmm.. okeeey still decent (week three) AMAGAD DELETE / BACK TO WOW.....

kenundrum7
kenundrum7

I just erased it from my hard drive. What terrible garbage. Who would pay to play this? While the story may be interesting, the gameplay is so lame I can't get to the story, and do not care to. It is so boring.

kenundrum7
kenundrum7

I downloaded it yesterday. I am still waiting for it to become interesting. I saw awesome cut scenes before it came out, but now I am thinking they were Teasers only.

Jacen22
Jacen22

This game has the best story I have seen in an mmo to date. All 8 classes has their own personal story that is different with every class having 5 efferent companions for each. Play the game for the story but once you hit level cap there is absolutely nothing to do unless you really like grinding and raiding for strong gear or are in to pvp which is terrible in this game. Undoubtedly the worst pvp I have ever seen in an mmo.


I don't see why people grind the end-game for good mods to upgrade their equipment, the story is over, there is no one left to fight or progress the story. What the fuck are you going to do with that uber gear/weapon? The cartel market is ridiculously overpriced, i mean it is really expensive to buy useless junk that come at random in packs what aren't even worth a buck but the amount they charge for each pack is just plain robbery and people willingly pour money in to it in the off chance of getting something rare.


I recommend you try this game for free and just play the story line which can be done solo (thank god because the community is absolutely terrible, unhelpful and cannot take criticism about the game and constantly badgers you to subscribe to the game almost like a bully as if they work for EA), flashpoints are basically boring and useless but you can run 5 a week so it might help you level a bit with dailies. Play for the story and then just leave cause this is pure EA in virtual reality designed to fuck you over while raping your wallet, don't fall for it.


P.S.- Don't join an RP server it's nothing but cyber mmo-sex that goes on in there. People pretend to stand in front of a cantina and brazenly/coyly flirt with each other using star wars themes as sexual innuendos and then hook up (I have no idea how that works but you hear people talking about it in general chat) and then try to go sex up another female toon which is more than likely a guy playing it since pretty much all the female toons seem to wear as little clothing as possible.

blubeetle2
blubeetle2

Having been an ex subscriber after a month playing almost non-stop and then decided to quit and delete the game, feeling much better afterwards, let me tell you the real truth about SWTOR:

1. Extremely BAAAAAAD Customer Support

2. If you think being a subscriber there you're free from money milking pay-to-win scheme, think again. Oh, and free to play? My butts! Don't make me laugh. Things are even worse for F2P players--and is intentionally made that way.

3. Super ridiculous Legacy system. You'll often wonder why this being enforced at all in the first place. Designed exclusively as a money sink device--subscriber or not. Same as Cartel Shop (this one is even more ridiculous).

4. Extremely idiotic and annoying fanboys/asskissers squad I've ever seen (Due to being paid, maybe? Not sure. Don't care anymore) that always destroy ALL kinds of criticisms--even the nice and constructive ones, before immediately and suddenly being banned officially by moderator. Even should any incidentally exists, do not hope it will have the least bit of proper treatment, or further action (fap mode on).

The whole things almost feel like a religious, national ideology or something. Like they've got nothing better to do then defending what the outsiders can clearly see as a failed product. I mean: get a life, morons!

5. Story-based content? Bull. It's different for like two classes per faction (Rep or Imp). The rest is the same. Choices in the story to have impacts in the game? Bull. Nothing's changed. Grind fest fapfapfap all the way 'till you bleed and die of boredom.

6. Coitus interuptus after reaching Lvl. 50 (the highest level cap in SWTOR, minus Makeb). One will wonder heavily what to do after which.

7. Able to play as a fully single player experience? Bull. The game forces you to group when fighting bosses, despite having the same or below one's level--with insane HP and cranked stats to boot. Look at the star/planet chart in your ship for guidance of what level you should be before leaving or even hope to complete one planet's quests. Based on experience, it should be at least 3 levels above the written/targeted ones.

8. Cartel Shop is a joke. Choke full of useless vanity craps nobody needs on the field.

9. The final nail in the coffin: BUGGY AND UNSTABLE ENGINE AND SERVER! Severe server latensy, graphical artefacts and crash to desktop be your true eternal friend and companion. EVERYBODY knows and experience it themselves but denied vehemently. Idiot. Don't bother posting a complaint or even constructive suggestion(s). Look up point 4.

blubeetle2
blubeetle2

Having been an ex subscriber after a month playing almost non-stop and then decided to quit and delete the game, feeling much better afterwards, let me tell you the real truth about SWTOR:

1. Extremely BAAAAAAD Customer Support

2. If you think being a subscriber there you're free from money milking pay-to-win scheme, think again. Oh, and free to play? My butts! Don't make me laugh. Things are even worse for F2P players--and is intentionally made that way.

3. Super ridiculous Legacy system. You'll often wonder why this being enforced at all in the first place. Designed exclusively as a money sink device--subscriber or not. Same as Cartel Shop (this one is even more ridiculous).

4. Extremely idiotic and annoying fanboys/asskissers squad I've ever seen (Due to being paid, maybe? Not sure. Don't care anymore) that always destroy ALL kinds of criticisms--even the nice and constructive ones, before immediately and suddenly being banned officially by moderator. Even should any incidentally exists, do not hope it will have the least bit of proper treatment, or further action (fap mode on).

The whole things almost feel like a religious cult, national ideology or something. Like they've got nothing better to do then defending what the outsiders can clearly see as a failed product. I mean: get a life, morons!

5. Story-based content? Bull. It's different for like two classes per faction (Rep or Imp). The rest is the same. Choices in the story to have impacts in the game? Bull. Nothing's changed. Grind fest fapfapfap all the way 'till you bleed and die of boredom.

6. Coitus interuptus after reaching Lvl. 50 (the highest level cap in SWTOR, minus Makeb). One will wonder heavily what to do after which.

7. Able to play as a fully single player experience? Bull. The game forces you to group when fighting bosses, despite having the same or below one's level--with insane HP and cranked stats to boot. Look at the star/planet chart in your ship for guidance of what level you should be before leaving or even hope to complete one planet's quests. Based on experience, it should be at least 3 levels above the written/targeted ones.

8. Cartel Shop is a joke. Choke full of useless vanity craps nobody needs on the field.

9. The final nail in the coffin: BUGGY AND UNSTABLE ENGINE AND SERVER! Severe server latency, graphical artifacts and crash to desktop be your true eternal friend and companion. EVERYBODY knows and experience it themselves but denied vehemently. Idiot. Don't bother posting a complaint or even constructive suggestion(s). Look up point 4.

paladinjedi
paladinjedi

Actually, its the quite the key-tapping-for-hours-leading-to-eye-straining combat, its non-realistic difficulty, combined with the endless terrain 'exploring' that mashes this game.

PinchySkree
PinchySkree

I like to play a game called "Find the rolleyes" where I go on the official forums and see how long it takes for me to find a pathetic apologist comment for a valid argument on why this game failed.

soneil12
soneil12

I've been playing it since beta and still loving it. To me it's given me the kind of enjoyment that I used to get from playing world of warcraft. For the most part, it's made the process of levelling, questing etc fun again. Something Blizzard forgot in their obsession with getting everyone in to raids and pvp where levelling became an absolute boring joke.

Don't get me wrong though - endgame and pvp are certainly not lacking and I find both very enjoyable. But I didn't get to level 50 thinking 'what now' or get sick of grinding endgame content. There's still so much fun to be had with my other characters.

There is room for improvement of course. Graphical glitches are more common than they should be. Some servers are underpopulated. Space combat is fun but could have been a lot more.

zillaman101
zillaman101

gonna get the game as long as you don't have to have a monthly paid subscription... Which I don't know if there is a paid subscription... Any help?

brainiac1988
brainiac1988

Saw the video review.. in a nutshell: WoW gameplay in a star wars jacket.

 

Ive had it with (this type of) mmorpg's. 

Had a lot of fun with WoW, the game is very well designed and the large open world is just incredible. A very memorable experience.

 

But later on,  a while after you've reached lvl cap, u realize that  there is no "End-Game". They keep adding new gear etc to keep u playing.. and it just seems like a big waste of time and money to spend 5 nights a week behind a computer in a virtual world. 

 

I don't know, maybe I'm getting too old :P

 

This looks like a lot of fun for the fans though!

leonvw
leonvw

Unfortunately, you left out that the game hasn't launched for everyone. Since December last year we South Americans have been sucking our fingers waiting for Bioware's good will to let us even try to purchase the game.

yummyjulie
yummyjulie

My first online game like this - long time fan of BioWare games.  Very much enjoying, although the long spaces to run around (takes forever to get anywhere even with a speeder) and the somewhat repetitive 'run here, hit 5 switches, come back' type quests are boring.

 

Otherwise, very much enjoying.

protostar000
protostar000

I thought TOR was very well done. I do agree that the PVP needs to be improved, the game is laggy, and the end game needs to be expanded. But it is an MMO and they are all work in progress.

costahd
costahd

nice review, and the comments makes me wonder indeed how good is this game , so i will watch all videos from gamespot, hope to create a realistic opinion

EternalSoul9213
EternalSoul9213

Ran out of room in the previous post but I will mention that the leveling system in SWTOR is good. It's about the only thing I can compliment as about every other aspect of the game was sub par at best.

EternalSoul9213
EternalSoul9213

Played the game with a friend. Was playing with my cousin and the friend but it was hard to get all three schedules together. Me and my friend played a jedi knight and trooper respectively. We both reached level 50 with the republic characters, our empire characters were level ~35. I dislike the game. I was determined to get to 50 and once I did immediately unsubbed and have no plans to ever sub again. The game is not ready for release by a long shot. Buggy as sh**; high resolution textures weren't released until a few days ago whereas the game has been released for months; graphics pale in comparison to any 2012 or 2011 game; game is incredibly, boringly linear; every damn side quest has you waiting 2-5 minutes in extremely pointless and idiotic conversation; combat is lackluster (same thing as WoW); half the time while playing with my friend we would split up to do our story quests cause it's a pain to have to walk all over the map to help your friend out with the story (essentially turning the meat of SWTOR into a single player game); there's just so much WRONG with this game. It should also be noted that I was never a fan of WoW either, could never get into the grind. The little bit I've played of WoW made me long for it compared to the clunky, buggy piece of sh** that is SWTOR. Props to Bioware and EA for conning me out of $100+ for an incomplete game. I eagerly await games that are ready for release like Diablo 3 and Guild Wars 2.

shadgrindk
shadgrindk

I find that even bioware cannot undo the damage Lucas and his prequels have done. I was flabberghasted with sw galaxies release and enjoyed it fully, and I hold bioware in high regard, but the time it took for Lucas to ruin my childhood fetish entirely came in between and I don't ever want to look at another lightsabre ever again. Star Wars, Michael Jackson's image, def leppard's music... The things once great that fell into darkness, never again to recover.

johnwck90
johnwck90

I have one level 50 and one 46 now and so I've played through a lot of the game. The group content is a dead loss for me, it is so hard to get groups that I've ended up just soloing a character and then I never really see much of the group stuff. People are nicer than wow when they do bother to respond but it's not a great game. I was just wanting an alternative world to WoW and was willing to pay for it but this game has been underwhelming. MMOs have to have some kind of public quest mechanism to encourage grouping. Sadly it just doesn't seem that people who play MMOs have the disposition to group or cooperate spontaneously.

driftingsilvia
driftingsilvia

@edmond_villamor If anything, TOR will gain more subscriptions. Warcraft has consistently been losing subscribers for a long time now. And it doesn't seem to be getting any better with the reactions Mists is receiving. In my honest opinion, I think MMO best days are behind us. Everything has been done, so no matter what new game comes out. It's not going to have something that another game did or didn't have.

edmond_villamor
edmond_villamor

I'm just waiting for the initial box price to go down or for it to be completely free before I get it. MMO's after a year from launch tend to be more stable and prices will go down after another fresh MMO is released. This year, after GW2 and WoW Mists is released and TOR loses more subs, I'm pretty sure they'll adjust pricing.

Smintar
Smintar

I agree with the writer in most cases,Space combat needs to be shelved its terrible. The winds up to be just another grinding game certainly isnt no wow beater but then I dont play wow anymore eitherPersonally SWG was way better than this!! Only if they hadnt taken it to another direction with all the whinners. Having exhaustion zones or borders was dumb. So far I havent seen alot of the tree skill benefical anyone thinks they were weak? I give it 5.0 doesnt deserve anything aboue it.

Lazerith91
Lazerith91

@trust2112 Not attacking you just stating something. I dont think a bug should determine whether you think a game itself is lame. If you got to level 25 then obviously you put at least some good time in to it, therefor you must of liked it. Get mad at the bug not the game. Im downloading swtor right now. hope its as good as everyone (except the dude i just made a comment about) say it is.

Lazy_Marine
Lazy_Marine

Any plans for this game to come out for MAC ?

ShadowofSonic
ShadowofSonic

Must... resist.... becoming.... PC gamer....

trust2112
trust2112

I thought the game was lame. Some bug issues with servers, nothing like losing a level 25 character with an update to make you not want to pay for another month. I'll keep the 15 bucks and go out and buy some more old SW games that play much better.

admiral_picard
admiral_picard

I was a SW:TOR beta tester for a long time, I saw the game evolve - but for me I hate how linear the gameplay is. I love Bioware's single player RPGs, but I like the general open ended gameplay an MMO typically offers. With TOR, I don't feel like I'm in an open world completely - it feels like someone has put walls up somewhat far around the edges so you can't easily get to them but sometimes they're way too close.

I was a SWG launch player - I played until Jump to Lightspeed came out (Which in my opinion was rather lackluster from what I expected it to be). The changes of SWG in the NGE are what pushed me over the edge. What I loved in SWG was the vast choices - you could be anything you wanted to be. If you wanted to be a Twi'lek Imperial Bounty Hunter - you could! If you wanted that same character to be a combat medic - you could! Nothing told you you must pick this class at the start and you're locked into it for good.

TOR is like most MMOs and like SWG became - you're locked into a character after creation. I understand why (story arc) but I prefer the open ended gameplay SWG offered before the NGE. I won't be happy until we get another MMO that does this. I had so much fun playing SWG when it was out, I miss those days. I don't always want to be the big hero - I like the idea of just being a normal guy living in the SW universe. But MMO makers think we all wanna be the hero...maybe some do, but why not let us choose?

jmrwacko
jmrwacko

I just quit SWTOR after the second month. The leveling experience is fun, but it hardly rivals any of Bioware's singleplayer RPGs, and the endgame is even less fun than WoW's. The MMO genre needs something radically different than SWTOR, tbh.

naam876
naam876

Have you played this game?

randaleleejewel
randaleleejewel

[This message was deleted at the request of the original poster]

g-man_III
g-man_III

It is an amazing game, and i hope it beats out WoW in the end. I loved wow when i played but i just couldnt get into it when i started. Maybe the pvp will get better.

johnwck90
johnwck90

I think it's a good game that can be great when people play cooperatively, this is the magic of this type of game that people need to exploit more. It is very good, especially after Alderran just it really annoys me when I can play for days solo and people ignore my whispers to try see if they are on the same quest. But, it is a good game. I think there is more mileage in the development of content since the story is more engrossing than WoW. I am sticking with it in the hope that they use the subscription well to develop a great game world and I hope that, over time, the game will get picked up by more diverse types of player who want to group.

luert
luert

a note for johnwck90, you are right, the fact that an mmo moves a lot in pve without cooperation isn't really pretty and that makes things hard since many people will play according their own needs, this reduces the game more to a not mmo like, mmo are truly meant for multiplayer-like some other people might not experience this problem but when the game's launched there'll be fewer people available in a way and less resources because evrything needs to be discovered, the fact that the game according to what not this review but others too describe most istances are single-player that means only those afk will be outside the istances and the other thousands inside on their own or with random people but some people may remain outside wich isn't pretty, I hope the game gets more multiplayer style to bring people together otherwise it might almost fall outside the mmo, still it's a pretty good game but I'd advice to wait for a few month before playing it, also all the company without mmo experience at start make some fails, this is not a fail but it's not awesome just good, reminds me also square enix with final fantasy online had lots of issue at start with their mmo took a bit to fix evrything since the mechanics are way different respect to a normal single-player game so give it times

luert
luert

the story is good bioware has always been good at it but on game mechanics bioware has still a lot of work to do,and some minor bugs have been spotted bioware is making lots of patches to fix them asap but it'll still take time the strong point of bioware game has always been the drama-story, the game mechanics are way lower than some other games mmo or not they always use 1 layer system or maybe some more but it's not like something as elder scroll or divinity II and as for mmo I know I say aion then final fantasy maybe and gw 2 and so on, the game is not bad but many people will follow it for the drama like and the brand of starwars not so much for the game-mechanics all alone wich are not evil btw good but not awesome, I wouldn't know myself where to turn to for mmo now, maybe soul and blade and vindictus seems fair to me, sorry for the comment hehe anyways republic online it's a fair mmo wich will try to make you have fun with story-like and some action but major work still needs to be done (=

brujahx
brujahx

This is the first Gamespot review I've ever strongly disagreed with. Yes, SWTOR is a refinement, but it's a very good one at that. However, the refinements and innovations they do have, make the game a lot more fun and a lot more immersive. When was the last time you've cared about a WoW NPC? I never have, but I've cared about SWTOR NPCs. I call that innovation. What the author didn't mention about neutral decisions, is most of the time they don't hurt you, but they improve your relationship with some companions. There's more to decisions that just light and dark side decisions. Decisions are not black and white either, some "good" decisions actually have very bad outcomes. That's what makes it interesting. I've actually regreted some decisions, something that doesn't happen in most games. Yes, the space combat isn't as good as a flight simulator. Is it fun? Definitely, it's one of my favorite parts of the game. Will it get better? Definitely, give it time. At least we agree that the companions are great. These are NPCs I actually care about, as funny as that sounds. This game is so fun when levelling, after level 30 I did everything in my power to SLOW DOWN my levelling (no rest XP). The story is that good. The most important aspect of SWTOR is that it's a really fun game, and although Gamespot understands that, they sure as hell didn't show it. This games deserves better than an 8, 9 at least.

pedroribeiro123
pedroribeiro123

I still wonder when other games are going free some houses insist in making this kind of game with subscription. We have incredible games with outstanding stories and game play completely free and then this big houses are expecting us to pay ...probably because of the brand. We have now among others games like Lord of the Rings, Star Trek, Everquest, DC Online, Forsaken World ... and so on and so on ...so yeah i will pull my credit card to pay a subscription for a online game ...

Red_Signal
Red_Signal

I thought it was a good review. Too over-hyped I assume, because I was expecting it to be an amazing (possibly ground breaking) game and it turns out it is not as good as advertised (just reading what others have said - I have not played the game). I will wait for Guild Wars 2 because that is well-known for being a linear game with huge potential. And no pay per month :)

johnwck90
johnwck90

There has to be room in the market for a more cooperative MMO or even the development of a server-type for people who want to group for pve content. Is that such a stupid idea? I mean, are there really so few people who just want to log in and play cooperatively leisurely questing?

johnwck90
johnwck90

The big problem with this game is the difficulty of grouping. It is essentially a single player experience. The last two days I've whispered about six people and nobody responds. I'm now level 39 and I haven't done an flashpoint/instance/dungeon since week 1, so hard is it to find groups. I am really regretting paying for this and I bought a new lap top and paid for six months play! The culture of the game is poor. I expect this will be the same with all of this genre though because it just seems to be the nature of the players who all seem to play for different reasons for me. Personally, I find work solitary and I play MMO's for some interactive cooperation which seems lacking in them. Least in WoW you can use the anonymous LFG and get groups quickly, despite the anonymity of WoW you can actually group. In Star Wars as you level it gets harder and harder. I've not levelled as fast as others and getting groups for the flashpoints seems really hard, you spend too much time looking and it's just more productive to quest but then you just solo the content and it's no different to a solo RPG. I feel like asking people who ignore my whispers why they play an MMO as opposed to a single player RPG but I've accepted, finally, that this is how these games are played by the majority of players. But it's not Azeroth and it's quite well made and looks ok so I may as well play it until the increased level cap in WoW gets me back levelling there and then I'll abandon this.

MoreThot
MoreThot

all of you people saying its lacking and comparing it to WoW first of all this game isn't WoW, second... IT JUST CAME OUT! WoW didn't have the lich king as a boss when it first came out did it? no. Things come with time. My gosh.

deustchin
deustchin

not bad game, i am just w8ting for Tera and GW2

end15
end15

@Jacen22 I had a very different RP experience. I found a group that developed excellent story lines, and didn't focus on cyber sex. Yes some of the men played female characters, and some of the women played males, although most people said so straight up. There was some immature sleaze by some players, but overall I found there were a great number of excellent improve actors who seemed to have a good time with the game. Yes many of the men tended to dress their female avatars in very revealing dress.  My wife played in a group called Black Star, and they were all around the cream of the crop when it came to dedicated respectful role players.

MilkyChocolate
MilkyChocolate

 @zillaman101 There is but they're going to metamorphose it into a F2P game very soon... late November if I'm not mistaken.

Succumbus
Succumbus

 @leonvw Crazy. To me it feels like it's been out for forever..

Star Wars: The Old Republic More Info

Follow
  • First Released
    • PC
    Star Wars: The Old Republic is a massively multiplayer online game from BioWare set in the same universe as its award-winning Star Wars role-playing games.
    8.2
    Average User RatingOut of 3466 User Ratings
    Please Sign In to rate Star Wars: The Old Republic
    Developed by:
    BioWare, LucasArts
    Published by:
    Electronic Arts, LucasArts
    Genres:
    Role-Playing, Free-to-Play, MMO
    Content is generally suitable for ages 13 and up. May contain violence, suggestive themes, crude humor, minimal blood, simulated gambling and/or infrequent use of strong language.
    Teen
    All Platforms
    Blood and Gore, Mild Language, Sexual Themes, Violence