Reality Check - Is Quantum Computing the Future of Gaming?

Does quantum computing hold to keys to the future of gaming? Find out what it is, and why you should care, in this week's Reality Check.

Discussion

230 comments
Wensea10
Wensea10

Well I will be simple and say absolutely.

amar1234
amar1234

yes quantum computing is the future, as moore's law is all but dead in the normal pc world ( he said pcs power will double every two years or something, but current pc chips are bottlenecked they can't get any smaller, they got around that problem by going multi core, but at some point that has to be toned back too) but we so far away from it its not even funny. 


The very best quantum computer we have right now is  equivalent of a calculator from the 80s. Even that is giving it too much credit is literally can only do one machine code instruction at a time. The problem is they have to find a way to relate machine coed to electron probability wave behaviour. the fact that in quantum computer a bit can be 0 or 1 i very hard to  code.

XCyberForceX
XCyberForceX

Good episode but I believe instead of jumping to quantum computing that protein computers would be the next logical step.  We know much more about biological responses that is predictable and can be used as on and off switches.  I found a 10 page scientific paper that goes into better detail about it and is very informative (see below link).  Maybe Cam and Reality Check may want to do an episode on that.


http://people.cs.vt.edu/naren/papers/ComputingwithProteins2009.pdf


simon1812
simon1812

wow! it must be a pain for this Harrigan guy to put all that stuff in mundane words,at least  as much as it is a pain for me to understand any of it...and I dont understand any of it T~T

smokeless_0225
smokeless_0225

Hey Cam:

In the next (available) Reality Check could you explain "Net Neutrality" and/or "Data Caps" for internet service providers and go into details about how they will affect online gamers? I read an article about it last week however I'm still a tad confused. I'm thinking that one of your explanations might clear the air for me. Thanks!

dalepickstock
dalepickstock

Im pretty sure HAL was intended to be the next quantum gaming machine in Space Oddessey

jeffgost
jeffgost

For, it could be usefull for improved AI....You know, enemies that are not programmed to behaved in a specific way, they would act like if they had self-inteligence...Would be cool. 

bigruss51
bigruss51

By the time we get to that stage computers will probably be powerful enough to the point devs won't be using all their potential.

bigruss51
bigruss51

I bet Albert Einstein would have been a gamer and figured this madness out already.

Silithas
Silithas

1: Wait... did this video play in 60 fps or was it just me? :O

2: Quantum computing is the future, but all we have to do is figure out how we can control atoms to be at either on or off.

trackles
trackles

But will it run Minecraft!!

DossHogg
DossHogg

Sounds really complex. Sounds kinda crazy. But... When asked the benefit of Quantum Computing... I feel like we all got a sketchy idea of what it can really do. Does this mean better graphics, frame rate, longer battery life (in cell phones)? They basically said it can search stuff faster? Could we potentially make an arch reactor like in IRON MAN and have an unlimited amount of energy?? It all sounds good and dandy but their explanation of the possibilities is basically "It has a lot of potential" -- what potential does it have????

g0nz0j03
g0nz0j03

The future of computing is Isolinear Chips.

tyronefonsworth
tyronefonsworth

Granted, I have very limited knowledge regarding the subject at hand.  Based on prior reading and overall experience, I truly believe in the immediate future any noticeable gains will be on the software side.  It *appears* to me that devs have been reliant on ever increasing power to brute force their games into working.  This idea is more geared to the pc side of the equation.

Given the considerably less significant step forward in this console generation compared to previous gens; It appears that their may be enough room for this to work for one more console generation, PC side that is.  However, the big issue here is due to the consoles' design relying on numerous relatively weak cpu cores, Developers will likely be forced to greatly increase their knowledge of and better implement where possible parallel coding techniques.

As a PC gamer, I fear what is to come this generation.  Awful ports like Watchdogs that make no provision for the hardware differences of PC may require vast memory resources from the GPU and do a terrible job utilizing our much higher IPC, quad-core processors.  Hyperthreading may be of some use and there is always the option of the expense Intel "E" line of processors. However, it's not even cut and dry that those are better for games in a majority of situations given that they tend to run behind the latest Uarch in IPC and generally slower clocks due to die size and cooling concerns.  

TLDR:  I really hope that ports get better than swill like Watchdogs going forward.  Also, I believe improvement in the near future will come from coding techniques, better API, and more efficient hardware design (due to the slow down in power increase resulting from the limitations of Moore's Law).

Jasper_73
Jasper_73

When he stated that the quantum computer would be just one small part of your computer. That kind of reminded me of a prediction where someone (I don't remember who) said that the world would only ever need 4 computers. I don't think that you can really predict where this will take us. If it takes us anywhere at all. 

sethfrost
sethfrost

+1 for having an actual scientist on that segment. I was ready to crucify you for this video, but it's actually good pop-science. (I have a PhD in Physics in real life).

Alecmrhand
Alecmrhand

Quantum entanglement is the future of internet inter connectivity. I believe our children or grandchildren wont hook their computers up to the web through a cable but through some method quantum mechanics. Itll be the only way, with the exponential growth of program size, they will be able to transfer info back and forth at acceptable speeds.


The whole subject is fascinating. Im only depressed that ill probably be dead by the time all this fun stuff comes to pass. 

StokeMeAClipper
StokeMeAClipper

I don't know if the ideas are too complicated to put into layman's terms or if this was just poorly explained, but I'm none the wiser as to WHY scientists think this may be the way forward. I shall have to supplement this video with additional research.

Mojira7
Mojira7

Could be the end of gaming. If these computers could help us create something like say the Star Trek Holodeck I'm not sure if conventional games will still be interesting to me anymore lol.

Tranula
Tranula

I think we better tackle the laws of quantum mechanics before we try to turn something we don't fully have a grasp on yet, into usable technology.  Doesn't hurt to try tho. 

55584623
55584623

Great Episode cam! There's been many interesting theories regarding quantum physics.

I remember seeing this documentary showing a theory of how quantum entanglement could make teleportation possible, quite crazy stuff indeed.

A group of particles could be extremely fast at linking information for computers, but at least right now quantum physics seems like so vague for us, there's a lot of ground to be covered.

Not to mention how would these quantum bits behave and how would we transfer all the information we currently have in bits to this new language of code.

Zloth2
Zloth2

If these things come out, I'm retiring from the programming business.  Bits that are on AND off until something "observes" them??  No way - I'm not even going to try and learn that.  I'm just going to go home and play the games smarter people make with them.

PlatinumPaladin
PlatinumPaladin

That went so far over my head it may have set a new high altitude flight record.

I get your man Harrigan was trying to put things in layman's terms, but frankly it would've made more sense if he said there were tiny sub-atomic hamsters on running wheels.

amar1234
amar1234

@simon1812

its very simple, think of it this way. imagine a program that has to find the way put a complex maze. Current gen pcs have to try every way out till it find the way out, which takes time. They also can only try one way out every clock cycle. This is a  limitation and why extremely complex problem s can take pcs many days to compute.


Quanatm bit pc by passes all that, and you can literally try every way out the maze at the same time every clock cycle, that super fast. The reason its able to do that is because of electron behavior , hence the name quantum   pc. 


Electrons position in space  can be anywhere at any time and hence why they can do so many things the same time. An electron can time travel and beam around anywhere it likes (with ins its atom of course), so imagine that old maze program a quantum pc will know instantly the right way out.


The current quantum pc is very simple though it cant do much, we very far from being able to sue quanam pcs in software. 

DanGleeSack
DanGleeSack

@DossHogg The biggest advantage is that quantum computing is innately parallel, meaning that you can do millions of calculations at the same time, opposed to our PCs that can only do one at a time (it doesn't seem like one at a time to us, because it does it at such a high frequency, but it is only one). This will most likely only be used for the super-computer research type things, until we can miniaturize it sufficiently. The most important thing I see coming from it is that it will be powerful enough to mimic our own brains in that we process insane amounts of data at once, at it may help us model our own neural systems more accurately. Along with DNA computing and neural networks, quantum computing holds huge promise.

Our brain is still the best 'computer' available by far. Maybe if we understand it better we can see how things like creativity come to be, which you could simply define as the ability to create things mentally that don't exist in front of you and/or that are a combination of things you have see before. AI could get an quantum leap of improvement if this is possibly to mimic. I believe that giving it application in gaming is premature now, or possible even nonexistent depending on how we can sufficiently control it.  

hammerfall22
hammerfall22

@DossHogg I think they don`t really know what this technology can archive yet. So.. its seens early to bet at "better graphics" or "less energy consumption" yet...

VegasDawg
VegasDawg

@DossHogg It's fast very fast it's so fast it can be in 2 places at the same time. If you want to know more Time magazine did a piece on these no to long ago I'm sure you can google it.

DanGleeSack
DanGleeSack

@Shelledfade1 Not at all. Maybe for gaming, but it holds huge promise for research application and modeling our own neural networks.

DanGleeSack
DanGleeSack

@sethfrost Yeah I didn't expect too much either lol, but I think they did a fairly good job of explaining it without getting over/under complication. That's interesting, I'm pursuing my undergrad in engineering with a concentration in EE with a dual degree in physics. I'm guessing you're either in academics or research with a PHD? I'm trying to figure out if it is worth the extra year to pursue the physics degree, opposed to an industry job with engineering. Just wondering your experience with it.

Jasper_73
Jasper_73

@Alecmrhand If what I saw on a documentary is correct you would be able to communicate at vast distances without any lag. 

neowarrior793
neowarrior793

@StokeMeAClipper to simplify for you, if a you had a list of names on paper and you got a pc to go through them all then its would read each name on each line, if a quantum pc were to do it then it would read many names on many lines (at the same time). it means the job will be done faster (the positive) but nobody would know the order in which thoes lines were read (the negative) until we understand why and how it does this then its like a black box of mysteries. 

oldtobie
oldtobie

@Mojira7 So, if the games we play change because of this tech, even if the current method dies, then it is the future of gaming. Not the end.

chadpyle
chadpyle

@Tranula Even gravity isn't fully understood yet. That hasn't stopped us from exploiting its principles.

chadpyle
chadpyle

@Tranula We don't even have gravity figured out yet but that doesn't stop us from exploiting its principles. Measure what is measurable and make measurable what is not.

Zloth2
Zloth2

@PlatinumPaladin  Maybe you did understand it.  Quantum Mechanics does NOT make sense.  If ever you think you can picture what's going on in QM, it means you've probably misunderstood something!

sethfrost
sethfrost

@DanGleeSack Sorry, no advise from me. I wrote my PhD over 20 years ago! It's a different world now? I ended up working for a big technology company (neither teaching, nor doing real R&D). Good luck!

oldtobie
oldtobie

@Tranula @chadpyle But you said "I think we better tackle the laws of quantum mechanics before we try to turn something we don't fully have a grasp on yet, into usable technology."

neowarrior793
neowarrior793

@PlatinumPaladin @Zloth2 here really on the low end of understanding, unlike a normal pc if it was to go through a list of names it would do one after another (first second third fourth fifth etc each switch for each bit going on and off for each name) a quantum pc would be able to do many at once (even 5 names at the same time) making it better as it can save time. the thing is nobody really knows why its able to do it as logic gets thrown out the windows (as all the switches can be on at the same time which should not be possible) . 

PlatinumPaladin
PlatinumPaladin

@neowarrior793 What? But then how is it possible? Are these things being created by a being higher than ourselves? How can someone create something without understanding how it works?

Tranula
Tranula

@oldtobie @Tranula @chadpyle  But in my defense, I merely meant maybe we should learn to understand it better, in order to see better results from this technology that's obviously still in its infancy.