Legends of Pegasus Review

Legends of Pegasus borrows liberally from other 4X games, but little of the good stuff survives the transfer.

You know how pizza places offer "meat lovers" or "veggie lovers" pizzas, where they just cram every single ingredient of a certain type that they have in the refrigerator onto a pie? Legends of Pegasus is kind of like that: it features a lot of elements that 4X aficionados might enjoy in the right context, but they're all just kind of slapped together in a way that doesn't allow them to complement each other. It's pizza that requires a fork and a knife to eat when you ought to be able to just pick up a slice and easily slide it into your mouth.

Legends of Pegasus tries hard to replicate the famous GUI from Sins of a Solar Empire, but limiting factors prevent it from even coming close.

Legends of Pegasus' storyline relies heavily on tried-and-true sci-fi tropes, particularly a Battlestar Galactica-esque survival/flight theme. At the beginning of the game, you are informed that Earth has been conquered in a surprise attack by an unknown alien force, and a small flotilla of ships has managed to escape through a wormhole. You command that flotilla, and, as luck would have it, you've got a colony ship with you. You need to colonize habitable planets, research new technologies, build bigger and better ships, and fight off constant attacks from aliens seemingly bent on hostility. It's all very hackneyed, including the few plot "twists" that you see coming from light years away.

All that said, the storyline is admittedly secondary to the gameplay, but Legends of Pegasus doesn't score many points for itself there, either. Played on large maps of fictional solar systems, Legends of Pegasus tries to replicate the feel of Sins of a Solar Empire's GUI, but because Legends of Pegasus is primarily turn-based (only battles take place in real time) and because its menus and controls are terribly arcane and unintuitive, it fails to give you much more than a general inkling of Sins' brilliant interface. Zooming, for example, a virtually limitless function in Sins, is strictly limited in Legends of Pegasus. This makes finding items of interest (such as waypoints or resource fields) a laborious, scrolling process. For some things, like your ships or asteroid fields, you can use predesignated icons to jump directly to them, but then you're likely to lose sight of whatever it is you want to be focused on at the same time, also resulting in needless scrolling and clicking.

The game is overloaded with graphical options.

There's the planet management interface too, wherein you designate what you want your colonies to build and what kinds of resource allocation you want them to have, and you can see what exactly they're generating for you in terms of revenue, science, and ships. This interface is lifted almost pixel for pixel from Galactic Civilizations, but unlike that game, Legends of Pegasus fails to provide you with meaningful information about what your colony-based choices mean for the future. Sure, the game has rollover tips with what each building does, but with limited space to build and an extremely limited budget, it's never clear why you'd choose X over Y.

Speaking of limited budgets, Legends of Pegasus operates in a strange ecosystem whereby the survivors of Earth's demise, desperately escaping from an alien threat, completely dependent upon the shreds of the navy they have left to protect them, are nevertheless apparently charging that navy money for everything from ship building to production of shelters for their own use. Citizens pay taxes to the interim government, but if you raise taxes too high, their morale drops, which has some unexplained further negative effect. This is your only way to make money--without which you cannot build more structures and you cannot build any ships.

Inexplicably, there is no limit to the amount of debt you can go into if you don't collect enough taxes, and Legends of Pegasus gives you no warnings about your debt level. Unless you're paying attention to your finances at all times (hard to do when you're scouring for waypoints and fighting battles), it's possible to "rimrock" yourself: that is, put yourself in a situation where you're too in debt to buy the buildings that you need to get yourself out of debt. And then you have to restart the mission from square one.

To battle! Everyone just sort of shoot all the stuff at the red guys!

Most of the main campaign's missions are straightforward: defend yourself from randomly timed alien invasions, seek out some critical resource, build up your forces, counterattack, and so on. Nothing is particularly taxing on your brain (apart from how to make enough money from the ingrates you're protecting without offending them), but eventually you encounter Legends of Pegasus' combat engine, like it or not. And the truth is probably going to be "not." Combat in Legends of Pegasus is a chaotic affair in which your ships, from what was otherwise a stationary, turn-based game, suddenly spring to life and engage enemy ships in real time. Giving orders to your ships is very difficult, because selecting ships and targets often fails to register with the AI, and individual buttons for ships' commands are tiny and hard to use effectively. If your ships outnumber and/or out-tech the enemy, you're going to win. None of the skills from other real-time strategy games, such as crowd control, division of labor (aka rock-paper-scissors), actions per minute, or other such staples, seem to matter in the slightest.

That's Legends of Pegasus: lots of quantity, little quality. While it borrows liberally from just about every major 4X sci-fi game up until now, it does so in a haphazard fashion, losing all, or nearly all, of the things that made those games so great. It doesn't help that Legends of Pegasus is buggy, with an annoying DRM login that frequently blocks you from getting to the game and plenty of graphical glitches.

Don't worry about formations or special abilities; just group your ships next to each other and pound away. It won't matter.

The AI leaves much to be desired as well, since ships never do anything on their own initiative besides run straight at the enemy and fire every weapon. Sometimes you order them to do something and they don't do anything at all. If you want to escape the AI woes to some degree, you can try Legends of Pegasus' multiplayer, but good luck finding anyone to match up with via the game's matchmaking system--its lobbies are emptier than a college student's bank account. Even if you do a direct IP connection to a friend, multiplayer is laggy, tends to boot you, and suffers from many of the same problems as the single-player.

Bottom line: Legends of Pegasus had a grand plan, but developer Novacore didn't come close to pulling off what it set out to do. Like storied Bellerophon, its hubris has proved its ultimate undoing.

The Good
Large in scope
Brings in lots of elements from other strategy titles
The Bad
Predictable, humdrum storyline
Bugs in graphics, login, and multiplayer
Poor AI
Gameplay bites off far more than it can chew
4
Poor
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30 comments
JACOBDRAGON666
JACOBDRAGON666

hnn and they tried to take down sins HA! yeah right i just cant wait for glactic civilizations 3.

X__
X__

And another screwup within the genre. Don't get me wrong I love the genre but please can we get more then1 great game every 5 years ?

So far we got Homeworld1/2, Nexus, X2/3. It would be nice to have another game that I could play longer then the 10 hours i usually am bothered with.

no_luck
no_luck

This guy should take it easy on the pizza metaphor. My favorite part was "when you ought to be able to just pick up a slice and easily slide it into your mouth." Mm. Slide it in there, baby.

avengerb
avengerb

Looks like they will need to spend another 6 months to finish this game. And then let compare this to Sins of the Solar Empire.. But wait a minute ..why are even comparing it to Sins? Sins is a stupid game too with just a good amount of polish.

I've played Sins and there is nothing in that game for single player mode.

As far as I understand all 4x games must have a good Single Player Campaign.

Sins has nothing.. 

So ppl stop comparing this to Sins.. This game is just a buggy version of Sins..

And both are crappy games not worth playing.

 

Someone needs to come up with a new game that actually has some deep elements, unlike Sins where the only thing that I should be worried about is the Pirate Base..

shruteshkumar
shruteshkumar

Ah well, was hopeful for this one after enjoying Endless Space, will wait for a few patches now i guess -.-

isahunt
isahunt

Thanks for the PC-only review, Eric.

 

Kalypso is slowly falling into a formula where most of their projects end up at the bottom of the barrel. Releasing buggy games and using the buyer as a beta-tester is just F-ing inexcusable. Maybe one day we'll actually see a real Battlestar Galactica 4X game.

gvalladx
gvalladx

I really like this game but can't stand how it just keeps crashing on me. Wish i knew it was going to be this shity could have used the money for my trip to the Ukraine

Succumbus
Succumbus

At least the game cover graphic is kinda cool..

picho86
picho86

God I hate Kalypso's DRM. I bought Tropico 4 on sale, and the first thing was the login screen. Every other game I have on steam trusts steam to confirm that I'm not a pirate, but not Kalypso. They still seem to think I pirated the game.

ShadowRun02
ShadowRun02

darn, i had such great expectations for this game

Quantomas
Quantomas

It's hard to understand why they released it in its current state.

downloadthefile
downloadthefile

I'm always upset whenever a video game is bad because it's another wasted opportunity to give me a game that I want.

nomoredroids
nomoredroids

 @X__ Try Endless Space. Its new and I think it is fantastic. 

ColdfireTrilogy
ColdfireTrilogy

 @avengerb apparently you never played classic RTS much.  Most people who played games like HOMM and AOE tended to just start up large skirmish or open random maps and play the A since the campaigns were so linear that after one or two times beating them there wasnt much to do.  Thats all Sins provides as well and its plenttty.

PETERAKO
PETERAKO

 @avengerb SINS deserves props for the quality it offers for its budget, and although there is no definitive main campaign it has a very robust and solid single player, also there is endless space which is also kick ass.

 

as for the comparison i whole heartedly believe that comparing the two is a valid fact.

dutchgamer83
dutchgamer83

 @avengerb 4x need to have a good single player campaign? Sins wasn't primarely a SP game, it was meant to play with other players.They never inserted much of a story in the original cause they focused on the multiplayer part. Singleplayer was just there so you could play alone. And it still was a good game. Just not your type of game but not a bad game at all.

Kabals
Kabals

 @avengerb Sins has a fairly robust single player game with hundreds of maps to play; some that are different every game.

holenjd
holenjd

 @avengerb You are certainly entitled to that opinion but I love Sins.  I wish they would hurry up and make a true sequel.

Zloth2
Zloth2

 @isahunt

 It isn't just bad, it's stupid.  Years from now, people are going to be looking for 4X games and they will see reviews like this one - assuming they even look at all with the overall rating so low.  Worse yet, Endless Space has shown that you can tell people that this is beta testing and they will buy your game instead of pulling this kind of rip-off.

Zloth2
Zloth2

 @Quantomas

 Same as always, I expect.  The developer thinks they can get it done in X months but it turns out they actually can't.  If they are only a bit off then the publisher can pay them for a little longer but, if they are several months off, the publisher has to decide if it's worth it to pay to get it done or if they are just throwing good money after bad (or if they even have the money to keep paying the developers).

 

In this case, it looks like the publisher said "Nope".  The developers knocked together what they could and shoved it out the door.  It's that or just cancel completely.

mswy
mswy

 @downloadthefile Same here. Space strategy games which are good are so rare, the only one still give me good memory is homeworld..

X__
X__

 @nomoredroids After playing Endless space for17 hours I  got bored.

Siddha19
Siddha19

 @tim1935  @X__ Hell yeah...  loved that game...  lost many hours in the crazy Russian translation too. 

avengerb
avengerb

 @ColdfireTrilogy I have been playing since 1989 ...and I have played all the RTS games and the one thing Sins does not have is the effect of the tech Tree actually doing something. In SIN all you need is max number of the biggest ships possible. There is no real use of a scout unit or the envoy ... They are practically useless.. well this is just my thought. I know other would have a different opinion. All i am saying is all 4x games and RTS these days are getting dumbed down for the masses to appeal to everyone and Sins is 100% one of them. 

 

Reason : I tried playing it many times but at the end there is nothing to do but collect a huge number of ships an auto attack on the enemy base. Where is the "Strategy" ?  In AOE (not a 4x but using as an example) you could take 1 villager 2 archers and 4 melee units near the enemy Gold deposit and really change the game around. Meaning strategically located offensive forward bases could be formed. Similarly in Sins ....... you have nothing. 4x was meant to have a lot of strategy and not just sell and buy from BlackMarket to make huge fleets and do a right click on the enemy base.

 

As for your comment about random maps, in SINS you could try a thousand random maps...but the game would play exactly the same. 

Step 1: Make defensive structures

Step2: Scout a Bit

Step3: Get hold of a few planets

Step4: Do some reseach while doing the above 3.

Step 5: Make huge fleet

Step6: ?????

Step7: Profit --> Win.

 

Done.

 

 

 

Quantomas
Quantomas

 @Zloth2 This is the most probable explanation. My question was meant a bit more subtly though. ;)

 

There must have been someone, at the publisher I guess, who gambled that this approach will yield something. But with the reviews now clearly identifying the issues, it's an unmitigated disaster.

skrat_01
skrat_01

 @avengerb  @ColdfireTrilogy Sins is in realtime, and for that reason alone it is deliberately streamlined, designed around multiplayer and inter-player interaction. For that reason it's utterly brilliant at what it was.

 

It isn't a successor to Galactic Civ 2 in the slightest.

Legends of Pegasus More Info

  • First Released
    • PC
    Legends of Pegasus is a space simulation game from Kalypso Media.
    3.7
    Average User RatingOut of 99 User Ratings
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    Developed by:
    Kalypso
    Published by:
    Kalypso
    Genres:
    Simulation
    Content is generally suitable for ages 10 and up. May contain more cartoon, fantasy or mild violence, mild language and/or minimal suggestive themes.
    Everyone 10+
    All Platforms
    Fantasy Violence, Language, Mild Blood