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Review

DmC: Devil May Cry Review

  • Game release: January 15, 2013
  • Reviewed: January 13, 2013
  • X360

With assured storytelling, great combat, and imaginative design, DmC: Devil May Cry is a more-than-worthy reboot for a classic franchise.

'

There's a point in DmC: Devil May Cry where everything just falls into place, a point where--after being mollycoddled through hours of gentle combat--you're finally let off the leash. And at that point, chaos ensues. The gates of hell are opened, once-timid demons become tremendous horrors, and Dante transforms into a fighter of glowing theatrics and tense technical wizardry. Immense, over-the-top combos flow from the fingertips, unleashing all manner of visually enticing carnage with a precise, fluid feel. So entertaining is the combat, in fact, that it's easy to overlook what a wonderful achievement DmC is as a whole.

But to do so would do the game a great disservice. The story, for instance, is light-years ahead of previous games in the series. Where they were schlocky, B-movie tales of adolescent fantasy, DmC has a sense of restraint, and maturity. Not that it's entirely evident from the off. A slew of half-naked bodies and raucous rock music make for a less-than-enticing introduction to the new, modern-day Dante's world, where he lives the playboy lifestyle of booze, nonstop parties, and sleazy sex. It's only with the arrival of the hardened psychic Kat and the emergence of a frightening demon horde that Dante, and the story, begins to grow up.

What follows is a tale of evil, world domination, and love that weaves in touches of conspiracy theory and religious dogma to great effect. There's no denying that there's still a drop of Devil May Cry lunacy to it all, particularly in Dante's cheesy quips, but underneath that over-the-top exterior lies heart. There are real moments of drama and excitement that are coupled with some well-realised characters that walk a fine line between good and evil. It helps that they're backed by a terrific voice cast--especially the truly frightening villain Mundis--that delivers even the maddest of dialogue with the utmost sincerity.

DmC's greater focus on storytelling comes at expense of some freedom, but the game is no worse off for it. Gone is the tedious backtracking and repetition of Devil May Cry 4, replaced with an adventure that--for the most part--propels you forward at a breakneck pace. One moment you're escaping a blood-red city that's folding and crumbling around you, and the next you're infiltrating the offices of a famed TV network where the earthly world and that of Limbo have collided in an explosion of vicious demons and ghastly black ooze that drips from every wall.

Such is the variety in your adventure that it does an admirable job of glossing over the linear nature of the story. It helps, of course, that the action is exciting too. Dante is a man with some impressive physical skills that are augmented by an equally impressive range of deadly weaponry. Initially that weaponry takes the form of Rebellion, a sword with a medium speed and attack range that serves as the bedrock for combos.

With just a few taps it's easy to perform simple combos that cut a sharp path through enemies and launch them into the air where you can deal more damage before they explode into a wonderfully satisfying mess of gory blobs. It's not long before you reach the limits of what you can do with a single weapon, though, which makes the time it takes to gather new ones a tad grating. Still, once the game finally lets you loose with a bigger arsenal, the combat takes a rewarding turn. What opens up before you is a vast set of moves that can be smoothly chained together for some technically impressive and oh-so-gorgeous-looking combos.

The combat is done in a way that cleverly plays to the strengths of each weapon, and that of your opponents' weapons. For instance, lighter, angelic weapons like the Osiris scythe are geared towards juggling enemies in the air and dealing spinning swipes that take out large groups all at once. Heavier, demonic weapons like the Arbiter axe focus on all-out strength, pummelling demons into the ground with a hefty brute force, albeit at the expense of attack speed. Combine the two, and you can knock out enemies with the swifter, lighter weapon before neatly finishing them off with a deadly demonic blow.

As you gain more-advanced weapons and abilities, the combos that are open to you become more complex. Chains that let you pull yourself towards enemies, or pull them towards you, result in some explosive combos that see Dante zipping elegantly between enemies, dealing out brutal punishment between each throw of a chain. Then there are Dante's guns, Ebony and Ivory, which are ideal for dishing out short, sharp bursts of bullets and filling in the gaps between other attacks. Combine your moves, and the combat turns into a harmonious ballet of sword slicing, swinging, and all-out carnage that's not only impressive to look at, but delightful to perform too.

It's a fluid system that's easy to get to grips with. There's a trick to the timing that only practice can perfect, but the barrier to entry is low enough that even newcomers to the genre can dish out some tasty moves. And if you really want to get cocky, there are various moves that can be cancelled midway through their animations for chaining together even larger and deadlier combos. The neatly animated and gruesomely designed enemies add a level of complexity too. Some, such as eerie walking skeletons, are armed with shields that can be broken only with heavy weaponry, while others, like vicious blue mutant dogs, can be damaged only by your lighter, angelic scythe.

And there are others, like decrepit cherubs that hover in the air, that are ready to be pulled down to earth with a mighty whip of a chain, and huge, heavily armoured behemoths that can be destroyed only from a certain angle of weakness. Such variety means you can't simply sit back and hammer buttons to win; you have to make use of your brain as well as your thumbs to succeed. That alone makes for combat that's far more engaging than a run-of-the-mill hack-and-slasher. Plus, if you really want to spice things up, you can use Dante's stylish devil trigger ability to freeze enemies and take out a whole group of them in one huge combo.

The reward for all your hard work, aside from the visual payoff, are souls. Souls can be used to upgrade Dante's abilities and weapons, giving you new moves and increased power to play with. Indeed, there are quite a few moves, including Dante's famous Rainmaker, that are essential purchases for combo chasers. Upgrades that increase your power make some of the tougher enemies--particularly those towards the end of the game--a little easier to deal with. There's also the requisite Devil May Cry scoring system, which remains largely unchanged: the longer and less repetitive the combo is, the more points you get and the higher your rating.

Being awarded with, say, an A rating over a D rating is your primary incentive for perfecting your attacks, and striving for such perfection is compelling. That's down in part to the fact that the combat is so fun in the first place, and partly down to the end-of-level totals that let you see just how poorly (or brilliantly) you performed overall. And because everything is so well put together, you know that the shameful D is due to your own lack of skill, rather than any failure on the game's part.

Unfortunately, for all the greatness of the combat system, the boss battles are a big disappointment. It's not that they're inherently bad so much as that they're formulaic and, well, old. The fights follow the usual formula of learning each boss's repetitive movements, and then identifying key moments to launch an attack. All that time spent perfecting your combos and technique is simply of no use against them; you have to follow the plan or you die. They are at least a visually striking bunch, with the gruesomely bulbous and foul-mouthed Succubus being a particular standout.

The game peters out towards the end, both in its narrative and in its combat. The story takes a twist you can see coming a mile off, while later levels eschew combat for laborious platforming sections that don't live up to the excitement and action of what came before. Things fare a little better for completionists, who can check out the many trapped souls scattered in hard-to-reach places around each level, as well as the unlockable rooms that are filled with fun and sometimes very difficult challenges for you to complete. Those include trying to defeat a whole room of enemies without being hit, or platforming down a tricky obstacle course.

The great completionists, and indeed anyone up for a serious challenge, are catered to with a whole raft of different difficulty levels that are unlocked after you complete the game. You can, for instance, play levels with more-powerful enemies that come in different waves to the standard campaign. Or you can play a mode where every enemy dies with one hit, along with Dante. Or if you've really got it in for your own sanity, you can play a mode with the most difficult, hardcore, no-mercy enemies where it's game over after a single hit. Such is the joy of DmC's combat that even if you're not quite skilled enough to make it through those hardcore levels unscathed, it's still a lot of fun to try. And in those moments when the combo system clicks and you enter that Zen-like state of Matrix realisation to perform an epic SS-rated combo, little can raise a bigger smile or give you such a feeling of achievement.

DmC succeeds both in its story and in its brilliant combat, and it looks the business too, despite a few minor glitches and the more colour-soaked levels looking like they've spent a little too much time in an Instagram filter. Sure, you may baulk at Dante's trendy new haircut, or maybe even miss a little of that B-movie Devil May Cry insanity, but the heart of what makes the series so enticing and so much fun to play holds true here. DmC pulls off that unlikely reboot trick of feeling fresh and inviting while still holding onto what made the original series so appealing and so special. There's no point in looking back: Dante has got a brand-new future in front of him, and if DmC: Devil May Cry is anything to go by, it's going to be a great one.

'
The Good
Tight, enthralling, and deep combat
Big variety of weapons and enemies
Imaginative demon designs
Convincing voice acting
Reboots the series without compromising its soul
The Bad
Boss battles aren't nearly as fun as regular combat
Some minor graphical glitches
Ending doesn't live up to the rest of the story
8
Great
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Discussion

1136 comments
Drkr_Zen
Drkr_Zen

Reboots the series without compromising its soul

Tight, enthralling, and deep combat


LOL Oh man... I stopped reading right there. And, just as an added note, I tend to start reading GameSpot reviews with The Good/The Bad. 

monowasp
monowasp

This game is one hell of a game, I never liked hack n' slash until now. Buy this game!

Arcturuss
Arcturuss

Was way better than DMC 4

Quite pleased with it as a reboot.

Warmuro
Warmuro

If you're a real DmC fan, you play the fukin game first, instead of complaining about it. This game is one of the most underrated games even though it's really great.

Alinooridinho
Alinooridinho

This game by the way is DmC.But you can call it DmC the Gamespot killer.Has a nice ring to...

Rcr152
Rcr152

This fresh spin on the series has great visuals and a very cool gritty urban art style, a fantastic story and polished to near perfection game-play that never ceases to be fun and engaging. While it’s a reboot of the series it retains the spirit of what made the original series so great and improves it with a deeper story, fighting mechanics and replay value with loads of extras.. its a shame people are so scared of change and criminal that this didn't at least get a 9.. one of my fav's this gen.

Garlygunto
Garlygunto

dmc, had good gamelpay. but the story and characters was shitt compared to the old devil may cry,

i remember someone said the new dante is better because his more human and can relate better to him, who the fuk cares about playing a character they can relate too, i simply want to play a awesome character which was the old dante,
i dont know how the new dante can be more human, when his half demon and half angel. and the old dante is half demon and half human, which was better, leave the part where you get to play as a Nephilim to darksiders,  and the design to all the new characters and weapons was bad, especially rebellion, very unimaginative and low rate creativity,

Garlygunto
Garlygunto

dmc, had good gamelpay. but the story and characters was shitt compared to the old devil may cry,

i remember someone said the new dante is better because his more human and can relate better to him, who the fuk cares about playing a character they can relate too, i simply want to play a awesome character which was the old dante,
i dont know how the new dante can be more human, when his half demon and half angel. and the old dante is half demon and half human, which was better, leave the part where you get to play as a Nephilim to darksiders, 

The_Godfather_
The_Godfather_

DmC is a fair action game. but it fails to capture the series soul and turns Dante a lousy son of a b*tch..

boss2208
boss2208

can any one help me plz ? i downloaded the game and started playing every thing is fine but the colors are strange ! there is red colors all over the ingame like waves

Ranma_X_basic
Ranma_X_basic

I have to say that this is a damn good game. far better then Devil May cry 4 and just as good as Devil may cry 3.

Personally i didnt see a problem with any of the boss fights. (though they're easy to figure as just like the rest of the games in this series). Also the Ending wasn't that bad. it gives us gamers a glimpse of probably what's to come if Capcom and ninja theory decide to make a follow-up/sequel to this game.

I'm rather impressed by this title and would gladly buy future games. No if only capcom would think about making a new Onimusha game that would be cool.

nairz
nairz

Awesome game

labub_007
labub_007

where r those badass cutscenes???

metalgrinch
metalgrinch

This game freakin OWNZ. Definitely the best DMC game to date, with DMC3 a close 2nd. I'm loving the new Dante as well, a lot more human and in many ways more likable than the old Dante, only because his character is MUCH more relatable now as a person, and the characterization in the story has gotten a huge boost with ALL of the characters. I'm excited to see where the story progresses in future games.

thehunter777
thehunter777

I just don't understand what is wrong with ending? it was fine for me.miss the taunt feature though.

tibbydriver0540
tibbydriver0540

Plain and simple I love this game. Playing it for a 3rd time right now on Dante must Die.

ewjiml
ewjiml

Waahhh.  It seems like no matter what a company does to a series, people love to complain.   I have never liked DMC......in fact I just don't like the genre.  But "Crapcom" actually did something right this time because they turned a person who is not interested in the series (ME) into a fan.  I thought the combat was OK, but the story revolving around Limbo was extremely entertaining, more so than most games these days.  I finished the game within two days on Nephilim and will probably play it one more time around.  Good job Ninja Theory/Capcom. 

isaacyassar
isaacyassar

Ninja Theory does very well with environment design for the stages, which often results in spectacular view in some stages. The game also loads superbly well, you never have to wait for more than a few seconds for anything. The fighting mechanics is okay, different than previous titles (especially without lock-on functionality) but also bring new mechanics for Dante. Upgrades system for weapons and abilities is okay, quite similar to DMC4 in some fashion. Though I think DMC3's experience based level-up system is still the best, because it truly encourages using something to level it up. The story is okay, realistic and good though the ending is seemed a bit forced to cover the final battle. Ninja Theory does good job and deserve appreciation, though as a fan I still hope Capcom won’t abandon original Dante with style-based fighting mechanic and Nero with devil hand + revved sword mechanic. I want them to build on that and if they want new mechanic simply make a new character to add into DMC universe, like they did with Nero. And it's 2012, most game publishers will want to hear what their fans have to say. Why don't you, Capcom? You can start by making a contact page on your website. Tear down that wall of exclusivity, be down to earth sometimes with your costumers. Learn from Valve.

paralitos86
paralitos86

well i dont agree with this review, it states that dante is the same guy,which i think is wrong, i dont know if you like or not the new dante but it's not the same guy and I am not talking about the way he looks.

In the bad points he puts that the boss battles are not as fun as the rest of the game, though i think the boss battles where better than the majority of the games and I am happy that the game is not affected by the growing cult called quick-timeeventisism

Royalbengal
Royalbengal

where is the saegame? i mean savegame path/directory?

Synyster102
Synyster102

Gameplay, nice! Exciting fight scenes. Story, too direct and not so much free world play. Great remake of the DMC series. Creative environment. The best thing I like about this game, the background music that plays during the fight scenes.

ziv741
ziv741

This game is just crap just a copy of GOW go play the real thing

Muggshelps
Muggshelps

I love this game. The ending clears up the whole physical appearance changes for me, so beat it on normal before you cry about the hair/jacket/etc. However, Ninja Theory made three major mistakes in this one:

1) Directly attacking conservative ideals and the Bill O'Reilly demon (face it, that's him). Personally, I thought it was funny and relevant to current social standards, but including these game elements is one of the reasons people were creating duplicate accounts just to downrate this game on review sites. (which is where the claims of 2/10 and 4.1 metacritic scores come from. Those sites removed the fake and duplicate votes, which is why it's now much higher). Too close to an election season, Ninja Theory. The political folks are going to be after you regardless of your intentions.

2) Who thought removing the lock-on features was a good idea in a game with multiple ranged weapons and ranged mechanics? This is a major gameplay flaw, and it's the only reason I can't rate this higher than the originals.

3) The wig scene. You can't change the appearance of a main character, and then turn around and shove it in the face of people who were already upset over it. The new look isn't good enough to mock people for being fans of the original.

hasancakir
hasancakir

Why this page doesn't show the actual metacritic score which is only 4.1 at the moment?

toffy666
toffy666

it is good i'm shocked !!!!!! no really it 's awesome GOOD

Bradjune80
Bradjune80

How to make a bad game look fine. A guide in three steps by Ninja Theory and Bioware:
1.Make a bad game
2.Make a feature even worse, and stir controversie around it
3.Blame any valid criticism in people angry about point 2

MaiHatake
MaiHatake

Although I think it could've been longer, with a little more challenging aspects I respect what Ninja Theory did here to be honest with you all.  I also enjoy the original DMC series and I feel Ninja Theory could've did more with it a lot more, but I also accept the fact that this DMC takes place way before DMC3 and actually tries to tell you how the world became demon infested to begin with and that humans actually did walk the earth not just Lady,Trish,Dante, and the acception of a few villians.
I agree with some hardcore fans with the new DMC feeling a bit like a hack and slash but I disagree with some people attacking the mechinics and brining up videos or how they believe the game should've been for the simple fact this version of Dante is quite frankly fresh and still finding his style.

It's a love or hate kind of thing, but for any true DMC lovers between mechinics and looks I believe it's looking pass those things to actually notice this isn't the original silver hair devil in which everyone is use to playing as.  New DmC gets a 8 in my book though only because I did sit down to play the game and enjoyed it didn't really drop the controller until I did beat it, and was satisfied overall xD.

Drkr_Zen
Drkr_Zen

@Warmuro  Its more overrated, than anything else. Its a great reboot for anyone that found the original DMC series too challenging, or hard to grasp, though. 


Also, if you like bad bosses (the most key feature of any action game), bad predictable storyline, and a main character that makes tin foil look interesting, then hey... this is definitely your game. 

Rcr152
Rcr152

@Garlygunto they are talking about his relate-ability and personality being more  believable and less over the top,  not his genetic  make up... and the story was less B movie and deeper in the reboot in my opinion..


Rcr152
Rcr152

@tibbydriver0540 i don't understand how people say this game is too short and has no replay value... :)

Mortz_88
Mortz_88

@ewjiml Alienating original fans is not a good move though, Bad job Capcom.

alioli
alioli

@paralitos86 Boss battles were - mostly, very static and did not enforce me to move much - hit the boss, avoid, hit the boss until attack, avoid etc


the only good one was bob barbas and the last boss really, the rest was very mediocre :/

Ranma_X_basic
Ranma_X_basic

@ziv741 How is this game crap?! like thereal-15-cent said, Devil may cry was out long before there was even a God of War franchise. if anything God of War took the ideas of Devil may cry and copied it.

personally both franchises are great games in their own right.

Nikhil9034
Nikhil9034

@Muggshelps  I actually thought that was really funny "Not a chance" LOL....(don't take this personally I'm just a new fan although I have read about the series)

isaacyassar
isaacyassar

@Muggshelps I like what you have to say about wig scene. You know who are the people who were already upset? They are previous customers. See, the company shove that thing to its previous customers in the face. Lol what kind of company that runs such concept of customer relation and business ethics? Guess its name. Not Ninja Theory, they only did what they were told.

alioli
alioli

@hasancakir why would it matter though, are you here for this review, or metacritic?

GSJones1994
GSJones1994

@hasancakir The actual score is 85 on metacritic. Checked it myself today.  I'll check this game out.

Darkmoone1
Darkmoone1

@Bradjune80 

Your so funny! Posting the same thing others have posted over the internet.

koospetoors
koospetoors

@MaiHatake Correction: This is a reboot and does in fact have nothing to do with the original canon. How in the nine hells did that fact not hit you when you've got Mundus - a character that canonically only appears long after DMC3 - as the main antagonist here?!?!

Zevvion
Zevvion

@Mortz_88 @Warmuro Not really. In the God of War age, it's nice to see a challenging game in the series again. Instead of all the 'press X to win' nonsense.

You can actually master the combat system in this just like previous DMC games. It's really nuts to see what some people are able to do with it.

capyvaraepg
capyvaraepg

@koospetoors @MaiHatake We can assume Mundus did not die. He could be sent back to Hell. In DMC3 ending, Vergil, which is left at demon world by Dante, knows who Mundus is and tries to defeat him. Of course he loses, because his soul is used by Mundus to attack Dante in the first DMC.

So, I see DMC as a pre-prequel, not a reboot. There are too many elements that work with the "canon" story to be a reboot. Vergil and Dante fight Mundus in DMC, defeat him and send him back to demon world (where he is the ruler). Vergil and Dante fight each other. Dante spares Vergil, who leaves. The world now is full of demons, because limbo and reality merged. Vergil discovers a way to use their necklages to become even more powerful, opening the Hell Gate one more time. He lures Dante to the tower. It is DMC3, of course. By the middle of the game, the twin fight again and this time Vergil is the winner, "killing" Dante the same way Dante almost killed him by the end of DMC - with the Rebellion stabed through his chest. Dante does not die and active his demon form. By the end of DMC3, Dante defeats Vergil, who is sent to demon world. As I said, there he fights Mundus and loses. In DMC1, Mundus is back and uses Vergil soul against Dante. Dante kills Mundus. Years later DMC 4 begins. Nero is probably Vergil's son, because he has Sparta's blood and is chosen by Yamato to be its wielder, with a demon form that resembles Vergil's DMC3 demon form.

My only deception about this game is that I was expecting an explantion about Nero origin's. I assume that Nero was conceived between DMC and DMC3.

DmC: Devil May Cry More Info

  • Released
    • PC
    • PlayStation 3
    • Xbox 360
    DMC is the next installment in the gothic Devil May Cry series, featuring a short-coiffed, fully aggressive Dante.
    7.9
    Average User RatingOut of 2062 User Ratings
    Please Sign In to rate DmC: Devil May Cry
    Developed by:
    Ninja Theory
    Published by:
    Capcom
    Genres:
    Adventure, Action, 3D, Open-World
    Content is generally suitable for ages 17 and up. May contain intense violence, blood and gore, sexual content and/or strong language.
    Mature
    All Platforms
    Blood and Gore, Drug Reference, Intense Violence, Nudity, Sexual Content, Strong Language