Feature Article

Nvidia Shield Tablet and Controller Review

Future proofing.

Despite some advances to the contrary, PC gaming is still the domain of the big boxy tower. But while there's no doubt that having a wall socket nearby has made for some impressively powerful graphics cards, Nvidia's having a bash at bringing over some of that PC power to the tablet domain with the Shield Tablet and the Shield Controller, the sequel to the quirky mash-up of gaming controller and LCD screen that was the Shield Portable (which remains on sale in the US). Powered by Nvidia's Tegra K1 chip--which features desktop-class graphics in the form of a Kepler-based GPU--the Shield Tablet may well be an early glimpse at the future of gaming; the idea of having just one device to idea surf, and email, and work, and game whether at home or on the go is certainly an enticing one. But, as neat as that concept is, and despite some successes, the tech isn't quite there to pull it off just yet.

Specs

On paper at least, the tech is impressive. Shield Tablet is based on Nvidia's 32-bit Tegra K1 chip, which features a Kepler-based GPU with 192 CUDA cores that supports OpenGL 4.4 and the DX12 API. In theory, this means PC developers should find it easier to port their games over to Android, with Epic having already unveiled a version of Unreal Engine 4 running on the chip. On the CPU side, a quad core Arm Cortex A15 processor clocked at 2.2GHz powers the Shield Tablet. That's actually the same quad core processor as used in the original Shield Portable, albeit at a higher clock speed. While the A15 is a powerful chip, it's slightly disappointing not to see something more modern here. Nvidia has already talked about the flagship 64-bit version of Tegra K1, which features the company's Project Denver CPU, a powerful chip first based on 64-bit ARMv8-A architecture.

The K1 is backed up by 2GB of RAM, which makes for zippy performance across the board; the Shield Tablet churns through pretty much any task you throw at it, which makes navigating through the largely stock version of Android 4.4.3 it ships with a pleasure. There's 16GB of internal storage, the much-appreciated inclusion of a Micro SD slot for up to 128GB of storage expansion, a 5MP front-facing camera as well as a 5MP autofocus rear camera, a non-active stylus based on Nvidia's DirectStylus 2 technology, front-facing stereo speakers, a 19.75 Watt hour battery, mini HDMI out, and an 8-inch, 1920x1200 pixel display.

Some might be disappointed not to see a higher DPI display here--such as the one featured on the iPad Mini--but the Shield Tablet's IPS display is lovely and clear, and has great viewing angles. You might run into some visibility issues if you're using the tablet outdoors in blazing sunlight, but otherwise the display is plenty bright. The lower DPI count is also better for running games, the more taxing of which stress the GPU at 1920x1200, never mind anything higher.

The display also makes a lot more sense when you see the price: at just $299/£229 for a 16GB Wifi version, or $399/£299 for a 32GB version with 4G, the Shield Tablet is definitely at the cheaper end of performance tablets, and it compares favourably with the likes of the Nexus 7, particularly because it's running a mostly stock version of Android. I'd happily pay the extra few bucks for the Shield Tablet; it's simply a better, more well-specced device.

I wouldn't say the same about the Shield Controller, though. While you can use any Bluetooth controller you like with the Shield Tablet, a lot of its features are built with the Shield Controller in mind. Unfortunately, it's an $59/£49 on top of the tablet asking price, and when you add in the cost of the kickstand case at $39--which is basically a necessity if you plan on gaming with the controller on the go--you're looking at almost an extra $100 on top of the tablet price to get the full Shield Tablet experience. Sadly, Nvidia isn't offering any bundles, which is a missed opportunity to get people into the tablet-gaming fold.

The Shield Controller features the usual array of analogue sticks and buttons that you'd find on an Xbox or PlayStation controller, as well as some Android-specific buttons, including home, back, and volume, as well as a small touch pad at the bottom of the pad for controlling a mouse cursor. There's a headphone jack up top for streaming game audio, or adding a headset for voice chat, and up to four controllers can be paired with the Shield Tablet. On the whole, the controller works well, with its proprietary WiFi connection remaining stable throughout. Nvidia claims the WiFi connection results in 2X less latency than Bluetooth, and while I can't definitively say that's the case, I certainly didn't notice any lag while playing games.

Design

The problem with the Shield Controller is that it looks cheap, like one of those flimsy third-party Datel controllers you used to get laden with at birthdays from a well-meaning Aunt. There's nothing about it that screams premium gaming controller in the same way that a PlayStation 4 or Xbox One controller does, and considering it's the same price as those controllers, that's disappointing. The plastic feels cheap, the D pad and shoulder buttons are mushy under the fingers and thumbs, and the controller is on the large side, so those with smaller hands might find it a little uncomfortable to hold. I also found the touch-sensitive Android buttons to be a bit too sensitive, and I often found myself accidentally activating the back button while playing a game. As you can image, that got irritating rather quickly.

I'm a much bigger fan of the design of the Shield Tablet itself. It might be a little bit thicker than some tablets at 9.2mm, but it feels solidly built, with a reassuring plastic construction and 390g weight that's not too heavy for one-handed use. It's an understated design, with a plain, matte black finish and a sole bit of branding coming from the embossed Shield logo on the back. The only bit of bling comes from the plastic chamfered edges around the display, which look great alongside the otherwise less ostentatious touches. The headphone jack, micro USB, and mini HDMI ports are neatly positioned at the top of the device, while the power, volume, micro SD slot, and stylus slot are easily accessible along the left side. My only real gripe with the design of the Shield Tablet is the thickness of the bezels around the screen, which are a tad wide by today's standards.

That's a small trade-off for what is a great tablet for the price. Indeed, even if you ignore any of the Shield Tablet's gaming-specific features like Twitch.tv streaming, or Gamestream for streaming PC games to your tablet, I'd throughly recommend the Shield Tablet as a great, everyday device. The gaming features are simply a nice bonus, which is good, because they don't always work exactly as advertised.

Performance

Nvidia Shield (left) next to an iPad Mini (right).

But let's start with the good stuff. With the Tegra K1 chip on board, the Shield Tablet flies through Android. Apps load quickly, scrolling is buttery smooth, and video streaming with the likes of Netflix is stutter-free. 3D games like Modern Combat 5 and Real Racing 3 run smoothly too, whether plugged in to a TV or displayed on the tablet's screen. Plugging in via HDMI gives you the option of launching console mode, which shuts off the tablet screen, closes all running apps, and brings up a simple, to-the-point interface that lets you load up apps and games or purchase them. Nvidia's storefront sorts out apps via controller compatibility, which is extremely handy, but you can purchase stuff straight through the Google Play store if you prefer.

There aren't a whole lot of K1-optimised games available for the Shield Tablet at launch. So far, there are just 11, including The Talos Principle, Half Life 2, and free-to-play shooter War Thunder, which comes complete with cross-platform online play. To get you started, the tablet comes with a free copy of Trine 2, which is a nice touch. I tried both Half Life 2 and Trine 2, and found both games looked great, but didn't run without problems. Half Life 2 in particular had lots of noticeable frame rate issues during busier scenes, and while it didn't ever get to the point where the game was unplayable, it was slightly disheartening to see a Tegra K1 device struggle with a 10-year-old game.

That said, I happily sat on my couch and wiled away the hours playing through Valve's masterpiece, quickly forgetting that I was doing it from a tablet. Despite the issues, the fact that a game of Half Life 2's scope plays natively on a device that you can carry around with you is impressive; it's just not quite at the Xbox 360/PlayStation 3 levels of performance that Nvidia boasted earlier this year.

Like the Shield Portable, the Shield Tablet supports Nvidia Gamestream, which lets you stream a selection of PC games from your PC straight to your tablet via WiFi, or even LTE. The only proviso is that your PC needs to be running an Nvidia GPU, and it has to be at least a GTX 650 in order for it to work. Laptops require something from the GTX 800M, 700M, or Kepler-based GTX 600M-series of GPUs. Nvidia says it hasn't made any large improvements to the existing Gamestream tech, so if you've tried Gamestream before with a Shield Portable, the experience is largely the same with the Shield Tablet: that's to say, if you've got a good wireless connection, it works well.

Over WiFi you get 720p streaming, and with a good, clear wireless signal, games look great. Obviously, the more powerful your PC, the better your games will look, but with the resolution capped at 720p over WiFi, you can afford to crank a few more settings than you would at 1080p. While there's no mistaking streamed games for native games thanks to a few light video compression artefacts, I happily played through the likes of Bioshock Infinite without issue. However, if you've got poor WiFi reception, or you're playing over the internet, then the quality and responsiveness of streamed games takes a hit. It's particularly noticeable in driving games, where the lag can make games like Grid 2 almost unplayable. Shooters like Bioshock Infinite fare much better, though. Basically, if you've got a poor connection, stay away from any twitch-based games.

Over ethernet, the Shield Tablet supports 1080p streaming, although, good luck trying to find a compatible ethernet adaptor. Nvidia doesn't sell one itself, and its knowledgebase for the original Shield simply states that "it may be possible to use a third party micro-USB to Ethernet adaptor," rather than actually suggesting which one to buy. So, you're left hunting through forums, and while some users have reported good compatibility with certain adaptors, it doesn't seem like there's a definitive choice. Clearly, if a feature is going to be advertised, it should be easy for customers to use it, and not have to go through a process of trial and error and Google searches to get there.

No. No it wasn't.

Twitch streaming is also a bit hit or miss. Activating the feature is as simple as holding down the back button on the controller and selecting broadcast. You can stream the Android interface or any game or app you like, bar those with protected content like Netflix. You can also add in audio from the built-in microphone, or from a headset plugged into the controller, as well as activate picture-in-picture with the front facing camera. Twitch streaming worked without a hitch with smaller Android games and Gamestream. However, when running more intensive Android-native games like Half Life 2 and Trine 2, I encountered a few issues.

Twitch streaming worked without a hitch with smaller Android games and Gamestream. However, when running more intensive Android-native games like Half Life 2 and Trine 2, I encountered a few issues.

Most notable was the performance hit, which caused the frame rate to drop dramatically in both games. Things got worse in Half Life 2, where the game actually crashed consistently at a certain point while streaming, and only by reloading the game, playing past that point, and then reactivating Twitch could we get past it. Perhaps an update or two will fix this in the future, but for now, graphics intensive games and Twitch streaming on the Shield Tablet aren't the best of friends.

Neither, it must be said, are graphics intensive games friendly with the battery. Nvidia claims around 10 hours of battery life when playing back videos, and certainly, with everyday use I could get through a few days without needing to give the tablet a charge. That changed significantly when playing games, though. The more intensive the game, the more the battery life dropped. Certainly, with the likes of Half Life 2, I only managed to squeeze less than four hours out of the battery before it gave up the ghost.

That's not uncommon for tablets, though, and generally, the battery life is in the same ballpark as other tablets in this price range. One other thing to note about playing graphically intensive games is the heat generated by the tablet. Again, it's not uncommon for tablets to get hot while running 3D games, but the Shield Tablet got very toasty after an hour or so of gameplay. It's fine if you've got the thing propped up on a table, or next to your TV, but I certainly wouldn't want to be holding it for too long for those types of games.

Verdict

Given that Twitch streaming is one of the key selling points of the Shield Tablet, it's disappointing that it doesn't work consistently across the device. Its small line up of games doesn't help matters either, particularly as there are frame rate issues with the more graphically intensive titles. Certainly, you're not going to be swapping your Vita or 3DS for a Shield Tablet anytime soon.

However, I like to think of the Shield Tablet this way: if you buy one, you're getting a great looking, powerful Android tablet with a near stock version of the OS for an enticing price; its gaming features are simply a nice bonus. PC players with a large library of games will also get a lot out of the tablet's Gamestream functionality, which--despite its issues over slower connections--is a great way to access your games away from your main machine.

Despite Nvidia's claims, I wouldn't get a Shield Tablet for its gaming features alone. Indeed, if you're buying it solely for the gaming features, then you might be a little disappointed. But, if you're interested in what the future of gaming might look like, Shield Tablet is perhaps the best glimpse we've had of it so far. If Nvidia can push the power of its mobile chips every year as much as it does its desktop ones, and if broadband keeps up, within a few years, something like the Shield Tablet may very well be the best way to game.

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Discussion

109 comments
toycrawler81
toycrawler81

I have to say your review is not inline with all the other written reviews, and pretty much all the video reviews available on YouTube. I have watched all the videos online I could find demoing console mode and all of them ran perfect. I don't know why you were having issues, but I am glad that this is the only one like it. I watched two videos today of guys playing Titanfall using shadow play/twich and they looked perfect. 


I guess what I'm getting at is I think you should try getting a different sheild tablet or do some work on your network  because something isn't right. Not trying to be rude or a smart ass,  but with the amount of written reviews and videos I have read/watched your's really is the only one having so many issues at least with what I have read/watched. 


kuhne
kuhne

Can anybody explain to me the point of this device? I own an nvidia shield and I love it, Im pretty big on PC gaming and love to build my rigs, so when I see a device that allows me to stream those games around the house, it’s hard to pass up, whether I’m sitting in the kitchen far from my pc, taking care of the baby, toilet, etc.

This device however, needs me to have a table in front of me, a stand and a controller, so it pretty much kills mobility, so I find it pretty hard to find an excuse to buy it, because I want to, believe me, it’s cool as hell but I just can’t justify it, I can’t think of a single situation where I would actually use it, I already own an iPad so I don’t need it for regular tablet use.

I used to be on planes a lot and for that it seems ideal but ever since the baby was born, traveling has become less important.

I love NVidia, been a fan forever and every single card of my builds in the past except for one have been nvidia cards, I just don’t see the point of this tablet when you guys already released a much superior product a year ago in the shield.

It seems like nvidia got it backwards, first you release the tablet with the gamepad and stand, then a year later you release the all in one product like the shield, because to be honest, when Im on a plane the shield is the only thing I have with me, my phone and ipad go inside my carry on up top and the shield becomes my device for music, games movies, etc. It’s very comfortable because you don’t need to have a stand to watch movies, since it flips open.

Anyway, just my two cents, this device looks awesome but no matter how hard I try, I can’t seem to find an excuse to buy it.

xxsynfullustxx
xxsynfullustxx

Why were you talking about DPI talking about the Display, when PPI is what's on the screen, and DPI is what's printed on paper?

nomailx
nomailx

"Styluses! yeyyyy"! rflol! Dude, I like Stylus and stuff, but damn they can never do it right. xD

saturatedbutter
saturatedbutter

Ha! I called it. GameSpot is using the "GameTech" label to branch out a new division all about gaming hardware.

www.GameSpot.com/GameTech

pgarciatx
pgarciatx

If you want a device that can play Any Emulator game (game mapping), play pc games while laying down via stream, as well as just having a solid portable tablet, the $299 price tag is a steal in my book. Not to mention it can run any graphic intensive apps like autocad.

Unkess you're looking for a 'pretty' 2k display tablet for movies and web browsing and eye candy, that'll be $350++

wowmar
wowmar

I just returned mine. Got it from Amazon. You have to crank up the brightness to like 70%. Playing just Trine 2 (spelling) it would drain the battery 1% or faster a min. Then black like bleed. Just not worth it.

Bowser05
Bowser05

All I would want to do is use it like my Wii U Gamepad/PSVita (PS4 Remote Play). If that's the case, is it worth it? Does it perform as well?

leikeylosh
leikeylosh

So, basically, this piece of crap is worthless to gamers.

blackace
blackace

Pass. There shouldn't be any framerate issues with a 10yr old game on a current generation gaming tablet. The fact that the controller is cheaply made and streaming games can be hit or miss, I don't see any reason to get this over and other gaming device really. Only 11 games to play on it? Seriously? Move along. Not much to see here.

rolla020980
rolla020980

Plays Half Life 2 with frame rate issues. HA! A 10-year old game. Forget this thing and get an Intel Baytrait T Windows tablet and an XBOX or PS controller. I could play Borderlands 2 with some frame rate issues on the BT tablet, but it was playable... not to mention much less expensive and it will run any of your Steam games since it is Windows.

BlendThree
BlendThree

Even after carefully reading this review, I am having trouble deciding how I feel about this thing.  It makes slightly more sense than the Shield Mobile but still had that oddness about about it.  Although I suppose if I were in the market for a powerhouse tablet, it would certainly have some merit.  A shame that the controller feels so cheap, it certainly looks quality in the photos.  Interesting.

real7a
real7a

Looks pretty nice :) #mobile #gametech

zeus_RO
zeus_RO

Are there any rumors out there of a 10inch version of this thing coming out??

themc_7
themc_7

This sounds pretty awesome. Does the same stuff as every other tablets, plus legit gaming? Nice.

ratchet200
ratchet200

I had no idea this even existed until this article popped up.

cremisi1000
cremisi1000

I am looking to get a tablet and this is very nice ,  I wish Nvidia would tune down that marketing GAMERS, GAMERS pitch a bit , i am not a hardcore gamer but its nice to have a tablet that i can play some games on  with my kids and for the hardcore gamers out there take it easy i do not think the tablet is trying to take down your rigs .

Valcrist08
Valcrist08

Tired of everyone considering this tablet as the future of PC gaming, umm all the impressive games are STREAMING OFF a freaking gaming PC strip that away and the games look like every other typical yawn tablet/phone games.  Plus for the cost all the crap you need to get going you could make a mini ITX pc that will easily run 1080p 60 FPS or act as a streaming client from a gaming PC via steam etc etc.  This is a joke but sadly all the tablet lovers will buy this up again forcing down this annoying endless spiral of tablets tablets tablets.

WolfgarTheQuiet
WolfgarTheQuiet

What this should have been is..... A tool for people with low end PC's to be able to play current games trough Shield. So the game streams of your, for example crappy Asus laptop and Shield does all the work.


I dont see a point in having Shield just to stream of your powerful PC, if you have a gaming session just use the damn PC. Seriously if you are taking this thing to every corner of your house including the shiter... well thats not normal to me, glued to the screen at all times.

Vodoo
Vodoo

The slowdown is more the older cpu used in the Shield rather than the gpu. Though, in the mobile universe ARM is king (Cortex & Mali), and Nvidias gpu's usually don't compare. And if Nvidia DOES make a better gpu, it's not long before it's outclassed.

I am assuming Nvidia went with the cheaper cpu to shave some coin off the retail price. However, mobile cpu's play a bigger role in how the Android device runs than a comparable cpu in a pc. Qualcomm is the go-to company for right now for mobile processors. And it's funny because not too long ago Qualcomm used to be the chip you didn't want powering your phone or tablet, back in the earlier Snapdragon (crapdragon) days.

veryDERPY
veryDERPY

a working dell can do half life at 1080 by now. not impressed

uninspiredcup
uninspiredcup

So essentially, an expensive toy for the 1%.

nazgoroth
nazgoroth

These devices are faaaaar too expensive for what they actually do.

johnners2981
johnners2981

Why is only nvidia hardware reviewed on this site?

JFERNANDEZ84
JFERNANDEZ84

SoooOOOooOOoOoOo, how do I play my Steam games on it?

toycrawler81
toycrawler81

update: 1) I have started seeing people having issues with wifi while holding their tablets in portrait mode they loose all wifi signal. Nvidia has not recognized this issue. 

2)  spontaneous cracks forming I  the corners not from dropping. Nvidia has stated they are excepting returns for this. 

famouswolfe
famouswolfe

@pgarciatx I ran some benchmarks on my Shield Tablet last night, it was unreal! I was pulling scores that were in league with actual laptops lol. I agree, the $300 Shield Tablet is the way to go if you want a solid tablet that can handle *most* of your portable gaming needs. 

famouswolfe
famouswolfe

@blackace The 11 games mentioned are the ones in Nvidia's Hub store, those are the games that are specifically optimized for the Shield tablet + controller. You also have access to Google Play which will literally give you thousands of games, plus you can run emulators too which will give you several thousand more games to play. Also, consider the PS Vita or the 3DS, both start at around $200 but once you factor in memory cards, a protective case, a few games, you've already spent near $300 for a device that has access to its own library of games but doesn't do much more outside that. At least with the Shield Tablet you can browse the web, check facebook, watch some Netflix/Facebook/Hulu (yes the handhelds can too but are you really going to be comfy on such a small screen?) and much more. The Shield Tablet is a sweet device, sorry that you don't see it that way. 

famouswolfe
famouswolfe

@rolla020980 Question, do you actually own this Baytrait T Windows tablet that you speak of? And if you do, be honest, what's the battery life like? According to the specs on Amazon, the tablet is rated at 4 hours, which in real life means 4 hours of doing nothing, maybe 1-2 hours of actual gameplay before the battery runs out. The Shield Tablet gets 4-5 hours of actual gameplay before it dies, and can last a couple days with moderate use. Also, you're knocking the Shield Tablet too hard just because HL2 had some frame rate issues. Mobile gaming is iffy at best right now, hell even Xcom: EU gets laggy and crashes on my iPad Mini 2 sometimes. The reviewer didn't even post any benchmarks for the device. I ran some benchmarks last night and it flat out killed other tablets and even some laptops. For $300 you're not going to find a better device that can handle HD games AND last more than a couple hours before needing to recharge.

pgarciatx
pgarciatx

From what I understand the Shield tablet will stream any pc enabled game with little to no issues. The drop in frame rate from the downloaded HL2 may be the pc port itself.

It's a 10 year old pc game running on a android tablet device that it wasn't intended for.

famouswolfe
famouswolfe

@Valcrist08 *Sigh* the Shield Tablet is NOT meant to replace your gaming rig. It's meant to replace your tablet. Also, do consider that most normal people don't have their gaming rigs hooked up to their big screens in their living rooms. Remember that right now, the war being fought is the war to gain dominance in your living room. That's why the PS4 and Xbox One have all these media and television capabilities, because everyone recognizes that he who controls the living room TV controls the house muahahaha. Seriously though, the Nvidia Shield tablet is meant to replace your regular tablet because it does handle games better than other tablets, the game streaming is just another trick it can do to woo you over to the Nvidia side. In essence, the Shield Tablet can act like a mini Steam box. For $300 that's not bad, too bad you can't appreciate that. Stick with your gaming rig, and let the rest of us enjoy the Shield Tablet, we'll all be happier I think. 

callsignalpha
callsignalpha

@Valcrist08 Totally agree with you.This tablet is a complete waste of money.Hard-core pc gamers focus on  allocating more money towards better GPUs , RAM and processors.Why would they want to waste money on this thing....a tablet which has "powerful specs" meant to run some average android games like modern combat and STREAM games off a PC.Nvidia should just focus on providingbetter experience of its gpus.A low cost version of Titan series of graphics card would have been nice.  

_Conker_
_Conker_

You don't see a point because you sound pretty narrow-minded and lack vision. Think outside of just your box and what others might take advantage of and it's far more reaching than just streaming PC games on the sh***er.

I have a Razer Edge Pro and desktop with a Nvidia card, so I doubt I'll end up picking this up, but if I were it certainly would have it's uses. Playing full PC games when traveling over WiFi or LTE (I still have an unlimited Verizon plan), playing Android games and using apps I already do on my other devices, but condensing them down to one device. If I were to use one of these, at home would be less about games and more about media/controls (such as streaming to a Chromecast).

The real benefit is for the same price as many other Android tablets or more expensive Windows options for light PC games, you're getting the software support of a variety of gaming options, along with the apps/media/OS that you may have already invested in with Android. Especially if you have a supported Nvidia GPU in your desktop and a library of compatible games.

aenews
aenews

The Tegra K1's GPU is far, far faster than that of any other mobile processor out today. This time, I don't think the Snapdragon 805 will fare as well comparatively, although I can't say for certain yet. They made an extremely fast chip this time that just about doubles the graphics performance of their last chip. The CPU isn't the bottleneck, so it doesn't matter, and it's definitely still an improvement over the last generation, just not leaps and bounds like the GPU, rather a minor incremental boost in permance.

aenews
aenews

It's a pretty solid, reasonably priced Android tablet. Tegra K1 performance is amazing, practically twice as fast as the Tegra 4 in terms of graphics performance. I doubt the Snapdragon 805 will be as fast. Plus, no other next-gen tablets have even been announced at this point, barring the Xiaomi MiPad. How exactly is it an "expensive toy"?

I myself have my eyes on the 32GB LTE Model for $399. I'd pair that with T-Mobile's $10/Month Plan (1GB LTE, Unlimited 2G) and ditch the phone. Ahead of the game with the whole increasing display size trend and far cheaper to boot with likely better performance.

CallMeDuraSouka
CallMeDuraSouka

If you don't have a few hundred dollars of expendable income, you may need to reevaluate your career.

Hardly a 1% type toy! I.e. Ferrari, Porsche , 12 mill Beach house

jcheng9416
jcheng9416

@JFERNANDEZ84 you actually stream the video using a PC with a comparable video card GTX 670 and above, btw if you have a mobile then GTX 660m does not work with it

rolla020980
rolla020980

@famouswolfe 

Do I own it... no, my company does and I have full use of it to provide feedback on performance and reliability. Actually... it isn't one tablet. Its three.

Which tablet on Amazon? There are many Baytrail T tablets out there. That's like saying "According to Amazon, the laptop with the Core-i5 is only 2 hours of battery". Its a pointless and baseless argument. In my usage, I managed 4 hours of battery on BL2 and 4.5 on Sims 3. 

You are comparing ARM platforms to x86... its no comparison. The iPad Mini 2 has a crappy CPU that isn't even close to the Baytrail. Apple devices are exceedingly reliable, but they are known to launch outdated. 

I can absolutely assure you that for MUCH less than $300 you can get a tablet as capable as the shield. You sound like you never really had the pleasure of gaming on the Baytrail platform. For a 2.2W TDP CPU, the BT is truly amazing.

rolla020980
rolla020980

@themc_7 @console_war_vet 

I have an HP Split... similar specs to the Surface, but almost half the price, not to mention the keyboard attachment is included since it is marketed as a notebook.

_Conker_
_Conker_

Adding on to this, the avg selling price of all tablets in 2013 was $381. So if anything, it's nearly a budget device relative to the competition.

WolfgarTheQuiet
WolfgarTheQuiet

@CallMeDuraSouka Most people make few hundred dollars a week and have bills to pay, so yeah 1%, that includes the rich and those who would buy tech over food.

mad0260
mad0260

@jcheng9416 @JFERNANDEZ84 Steam has its own streaming. With a windows 8 tablet, such as my venue 8 pro, you can run a second instance of steam and stream from your desktop. Tried it once, it was okay.

spartanx169x
spartanx169x

@WolfgarTheQuiet @CallMeDuraSouka If  $400  tech is for only the 1% then there are a lot of them that would be just about everybody on this site. Buying the tablet above is no different than buying the PS4 , the XB1 or a cheap PC.  a tablet will have as many uses or more than a console..  Which I'm sure you have one of the 3( a Tablet, a console or a PC) , so that puts you into that category as well. Congratulations, you are rich!

_Conker_
_Conker_

lol, nope. Not even close to accurate. To even think $300-$400 is a 1% and rich mans toy is hilariously stupid and naive thinking. iPads, Nexus 7s, Galaxy Tabs, other Android tabs, Surface, Kindles, etc. etc. certainly don't fit that description and total upwards of 25% of the U.S. population that owns a name-brand tablet, that's not even counting budget and low-end devices.

http://tabtimes.com/resources/the-state-of-the-tablet-market

A few hundred a week is near poverty level...which is roughly 15% of the U.S. population. Considering there are some hundred million people that make much more than that and have far less total expenditures, the majority of the U.S market can certainly afford a ~$300 tablet, which quite frankly isn't relatively that much in this industry.

_Conker_
_Conker_

@mad0260 @jcheng9416 @JFERNANDEZ84 Yea, but sadly Steam's is In-Home streaming off the same network only.


The on-the-go benefit from a Shield tablet seems like it would be the more useful aspect to most gamers. Sitting on the couch playing on a tablet or moving around your house streaming a game is a nice convenience, but the fact it's entirely possible to play the same game if you simply moved to your desktop (or moved your desktop) makes it a little less significant than having access when otherwise unable to without hauling around a larger laptop or powerful more pricey tablet.

CallMeDuraSouka
CallMeDuraSouka

Thank you for taking time to provide facts to just how stupid those two are.

jcheng9416
jcheng9416

@JFERNANDEZ84 @jcheng9416 i found thise from the website


"Stream games from your GeForce GTX-powered PC and play them on the SHIELD tablet with NVIDIA GameStream™ technology. Plug into your TV, switch to console mode, and play your games on the big screen. You can also seamlessly record your greatest gaming moments or stream your game action to Twitch as you play with NVIDIA ShadowPlay™."

jcheng9416
jcheng9416

@JFERNANDEZ84 @jcheng9416 dont get me wrong but the shield and the android app snes emulator is the perfect companion for old school games, games that you cant never see again and never play the same, imaging the original snes tmnt or final fight !!! you cant have enough of it