NCAA Football 07 Walkthrough

It’s time for another wild season of college football, and that means another edition in EA’s NCAA Football series. GameSpot’s Walkthrough will get your gridiron fantasies off the ground!

by

By: Doug Radcliffe
Design: Randall Montanari

A deflected pass leads to improbable catch and an interception return for a touchdown. Cue the fight song because momentum has shifted to the home team! It's time to don the shoulder pads and lace up the cleats, EA Sports' NCAA Football 07 makes its debut on the Xbox 360 (current generation Xbox and PlayStation 2 versions also available).

The biggest addition to this year's game is the momentum meter. With momentum on your side, your players perform better. Shift momentum with big plays on offense or big hits on defense. The momentum meter increases play calling strategy. You've got momentum: do you play it safe and keep the edge or try and put the game out of reach with riskier play calling?

This Gamespot game guide for NCAA Football 07 covers team stats and profiles, offensive and defensive strategies, online tips, and tips on unlocking Xbox 360 Achievements.

  • Team Stats: Statistics for all I-A college football teams in NCAA Football 07.


  • Top 25 Profiles: Check here for team profiles of the Top 25 ranked teams in NCAA Football 07. The section includes team, dynasty, and impact player statistics and on-field analysis.


  • Offensive Playbook: Improve your pass, run, and option play with these offensive strategies. You'll find tips on formations, impact players, packages, and the all-new momentum feature.


  • Defensive Playbook: This section compiles defensive strategies with formation advantages and disadvantages, momentum and impact player tips, and techniques for stopping the pass, run, and option.


  • Online Tips: This section offers specific strategies for conquering the competition online.


  • Xbox 360 Achievements and Mini-Games: Tips and tricks for unlocking NCAA Football 07 Xbox 360 Achievements and beating the exclusive mini-games.

Chapter 1 - Team Stats

The following chart reveals the overall, offense, defense, special teams, and prestige ratings for all I-A college football teams. These ratings were gathered from a fresh Dynasty. Note that some of the team's defensive playbooks differ between Dynasty Mode and Play Now mode. These differences are indicated in the defensive form column.

TEAMCONFERENCEOVERALLOFFENSEDEFENSESPECIAL TEAMSPRESTIGEOFFENSE FORMDEFENSE FORM
Air Force FalconsMWCC-CD+D+2 starsFlexbone4-3 (3-3-5)
Akron ZipsMACC+C+CC+2 starsWest Coast4-3 (3-3-5)
Alabama Crimson TideSECB+BA-B-5 starsBalanced4-3
Arizona WildcatsPac-10B-B-BB3 starsBalanced4-3
Arizona State Sun DevilsPac-10B+B+B+B+4 starsBalanced4-3
Arkansas RazorbacksSECBB-BB+3 starsBalanced4-3
Arkansas State IndiansSun BeltC+C-B-C+1 starBalanced4-3
Army Black KnightsIndependentsC+CCB-1 starBalanced4-3
Auburn TigersSECB+BB+A-5 starsWest Coast4-3
BYU CougarsMWCC+B-CC+3 starsSpread3-4
Ball State CardinalsMACCCC-B-1 starBalanced4-3
Baylor BearsBig 12CCC-B2 starsSpread4-2-5
Boise State BroncosWACB+BA-B+3 starsBalanced4-3
Boston College EaglesACCB-B-B-B3 starsWest Coast4-3
Bowling Green FalconsMACC+CC+C3 starsSpread4-3
Buffalo BullsMACC+CC+C+1 starBalanced4-3
Cal Golden BearsPac-10B+BAB5 starsWest Coast4-3
Central Michigan ChippewasMACB-C+B-B-1 starSpread4-3
Cincinnati BearcatsBig EastC+CC+B2 starsBalanced4-3
Clemson TigersACCB+BA-B+4 starsSpread4-3
Colorado BuffalosBig 12B+B-B+A-4 starsWest Coast4-3
Colorado State RamsMWCBB-BB3 starsBalanced4-3
Connecticut HuskiesBig EastC+C+C+C+2 starsBalanced4-3
Duke Blue DevilsACCB-C+BB2 starsBalanced4-3
ECU PiratesC-USAB-C+C+B2 starsSpread4-3
Eastern Michigan EaglesMACB-C+B-B1 starSpread4-3
FIU Golden PanthersSun BeltCCC+C1 starBalanced4-3
Florida GatorsSECB+BA-A-6 starsSpread4-3
Florida Atlantic OwlsSun BeltCCCC1 starBalanced4-3
Florida State SeminolesACCBB-BB-6 starsBalanced4-3
Fresno State BulldogsWACB-B-BB3 starsBalanced4-3
Georgia BulldogsSECB+BA-B+6 starsBalanced4-3
Georgia Tech Yellow JacketsACCB+BA-B4 starsBalanced4-3
Hawaii WarriorsWACB-B-B-B-3 starsSpread3-4
Houston CougarsC-USAB+BA-B+2 starsSpread3-4
Idaho VandalsWACCCCC+1 starSpread4-3
Illinois Fighting IlliniBig TenB-C+B-B3 starsSpread4-3
Indiana HoosiersBig TenCCC-C2 starsSpread4-3
Iowa HawkeyesBig TenB+B+B+B+5 starsBalanced4-3
Iowa State CyclonesBig 12BBB-B-3 starsSpread4-3
Kansas JayhawksBig 12C+C+C+B-2 starsSpread4-3
Kansas State WildcatsBig 12BB-B-B+4 starsWest Coast4-3
Kent State Golden FlashesMACC+CB-C+1 starSpread3-4
Kentucky WildcatsSECC+B-CC+2 starsBalanced4-3
LSU TigersSECB+B+B+B6 starsBalanced4-3
Louisiana Tech BulldogsWACC+CC+C+2 starsSpread3-4
Louisville CardinalsBig EastB+BB+B4 starsBalanced4-3
Marshall Thundering HerdC-USAB-C+C+B3 starsSpread4-3
Maryland TerrapinsACCBC+BB4 starsBalanced3-4
Memphis TigersC-USAB-C+B-B-3 starsSpread4-3
Miami HurricanesACCB+BA-B+6 starsBalanced4-3
Miami University RedhawksMACC+C+CC+2 starsSpread4-3
Michigan WolverinesBig TenA-B+A-A6 starsBalanced4-3
Michigan State SpartansBig TenBBBB4 starsSpread4-3
Mid Tenn State Blue RaidersSun BeltB-C+C+C+1 starBalanced4-3
Minnesota Golden GophersBig TenB-BC+C+4 starsBalanced4-3
Mississippi State BulldogsSECBCBB+3 starsWest Coast4-3
Missouri TigersBig 12BBB+C+3 starsSpread4-3
NC State WolfpackACCB+B-B+B+4 starsWest Coast4-3
Navy MidshipmenIndependentsBB-B+B+1 starFlexbone4-3 (3-4)
Nebraska CornhuskersBig 12B+BA-B+5 starsWest Coast4-3
Nevada Wolf PackWACB-B-B-B-2 starsSpread3-4
New Mexico LobosMWCB-B-B-B+2 starsWest Coast4-3 (3-3-5)
New Mexico State AggiesWACB-C+B-C+1 starSpread3-4
North Carolina Tar HeelsACCB-B-B-B3 starsBalanced4-3
North Texas Mean GreenSun BeltC+B-C-C+2 starsBalanced3-4
Northern Illinois HuskiesMACBBBB3 starsBalanced4-3
Northwestern WildcatsBig TenBB-BB3 starsSpread4-3
Notre Dame Fighting IrishIndependentsA-A-A-B-6 starsBalanced4-3
Ohio BobcatsMACB-B-BB-1 starBalanced4-3
Ohio State BuckeyesBig TenA-B+A-B+6 starsBalanced4-3
Oklahoma SoonersBig 12B+BA-B6 starsBalanced4-3
Oklahoma State CowboysBig 12BBBB-3 starsSpread4-3
Ole Miss RebelsSECBC+B+B-3 starsBalanced4-3
Oregon DucksPac-10B+B+B+B4 starsSpread4-3
Oregon State BeaversPac-10B+BBB+4 starsBalanced4-3
Penn State Nittany LionsBig TenB+BA-B+5 starsBalanced4-3
Pittsburgh PanthersBig EastB-B-BB4 starsBalanced4-3
Purdue BoilermakersBig TenB-B-C+B-4 starsSpread4-3
Rice OwlsC-USAC+CB-C+1 starSpread4-3 (3-3-5)
Rutgers Scarlet KnightsBig EastB-C+C+B2 starsBalanced4-3
SMU MustangsC-USACCC+C-1 starSpread4-3
San Diego State AztecsMWCBB-BB2 starsBalanced4-3
San Jose State SpartansWACD+DDC+1 starWest Coast4-3
South Carolina GamecocksSECBBBB-4 starsBalanced4-3 (Multiple D)
Southern Miss Golden EaglesC-USAB-B-B-B+3 starsBalanced4-3 (Multiple D)
Stanford CardinalPac-10B-B-B-B-3 starsWest Coast4-3 (3-4)
Syracuse OrangeBig EastB-CB-B-4 starsWest Coast4-3
TCU Horned FrogsMWCB-B-B-B-3 starsBalanced4-2-5
Temple OwlsIndependentsC+CC+C+1 starBalanced3-4
Tennessee VolunteersSECB+BB+B+6 starsBalanced4-3
Texas LonghornsBig 12B+BA-B+6 starsBalanced4-3
Texas A&M AggiesBig 12B-B-B-C+5 starsBalanced4-2-5
Texas Tech Red RaidersBig 12B+B-B+B+3 starsSpread4-3
Toledo RocketsMACB-C+C+B3 starsSpread3-4
Troy TrojansSun BeltC+CB-B-1 starBalanced4-3
Tulane Green WaveC-USAC+C+CB+2 starsBalanced4-3
Tulsa Golden HurricaneC-USAB-C+BB2 starsBalanced4-3 (3-3-5)
UAB BlazersC-USAC+CC+B-2 starsBalanced4-3
UCF Golden KnightsC-USAB-B-B-B2 starsBalanced4-3
UCLA BruinsPac-10B-C+C+A-4 starsWest Coast4-3
UL Lafayette Ragin' CajunsSun BeltCCC-C+1 starBalanced4-3
UL Monroe WarhawksSun BeltCC-C-C1 starSpread4-2-5 (4-3)
UNLV RebelsMWCBB-BB+2 starsSpread4-3 (3-3-5)
USC TrojansPac-10B+B+A-B6 starsWest Coast4-3
USF BullsBig EastC+CC+C+2 starsSpread4-3
UTEP MinersC-USABB-BB+2 starsSpread4-3
Utah UtesMWCBB-B+B-4 starsSpread4-3
Utah State AggiesWACCC-C-B1 starBalanced4-2-5 (4-3)
Vanderbilt CommodoresSECC+C+C+B-2 starsBalanced4-3
Virginia CavaliersACCB-B-BB-4 starsWest Coast3-4
Virginia Tech HokiesACCA-B-A+A+5 starsBalanced4-3
Wake Forest Demon DeaconsACCBB-BB+3 starsBalanced4-3
Washington HuskiesPac-10BC+BB+4 starsBalanced4-3
Washington State CougarsPac-10B-B-B-C+4 starsSpread4-3
West Virginia MountaineersBig EastB+B+A-B-4 starsSpread4-3 (3-3-5)
Western Michigan BroncosMACBB-BB+1 starBalanced4-3
Wisconsin BadgersBig TenBB-BB+4 starsBalanced4-3
Wyoming CowboysMWCCCCC2 starsSpread4-3

Chapter 2: Top 25 Profiles

It's the best of the best. Start the season in the top 25 and you have the best shot to end the season as the national champion. This section provides team breakdowns of the top 25 college football teams, as rated by NCAA Football 07. Each breakdown includes statistics for impact players, 2006 on the field statistics, and analysis. Also, in the statistics for each team, note that all teams possess Goal Line and Hail Mary offensive formations in their playbooks.

Each position player is rated in several different categories--the Xbox 360 version expands player ratings dramatically. The following list reveals the statistics and descriptions including new player statistics in the 360 version of NCAA Football 07. These aren't described in game so some of the descriptions are assumptions.

  • Overall (OVR) - The overall rating for the player. The higher the better!
  • Speed (SPD) - How fast the player can run.
  • Strength (STR) - The player's strength, which affects his ability to break tackles.
  • Agility (AGI) - The player's agility, enhancing his ability to switch directions.
  • Acceleration (ACC) - How fast a player reaches full speed. Great for sprinting through open holes in your line.
  • Awareness (AWR) - A player's ability to react and adjust. High awareness generally comes with more experience.
  • Break Tackle (BKT) - The player's ability to break tackles.
  • Trucking (TRK) - Player's ability with the truck stick.
  • Elusiveness (ELU) - Likely the ability to escape tackles (or perhaps sacks). This is a key statistic for running backs, receivers, and quarterbacks.
  • BC Vision (BCV) - Ball carrying vision: ability to spot the open field. This is a key statistic for running backs.
  • Stiff Arm (SFA) - Player's ability with the stiff arm maneuver.
  • Spin Move (SPM) - Player's ability with the spin maneuver.
  • Juke Move (JKM) - Player's ability with the juke move.
  • Carrying (CAR) - How well the player holds onto the football. A higher rating means the less chance of a fumble.
  • Catching (CTH) - How well the player can catch. A higher rating means fewer drops.
  • Jumping (JMP) - The player's ability to jump, such as for grabbing high passes.
  • Throw Power (THP) - How far a player can throw the ball.
  • Throw Accuracy (THA) - How accurate a player throws.
  • Tackle (TAK) - A player's ability to tackle.
  • Power Moves (PMV) - Look for high power moves in defensive linemen. Power Moves is the ability to power through the block.
  • Finesse Moves (FMV) - Similar to power moves but it's the ability to spin or swim around blocks.
  • Block Shedding (BSH) - How well the player can shed a block.
  • Pursuit (PRS) - Skill in finding and pursuing the ball carrier--likely laterally. For instance: a linebacker moving down the line to cut off the ball carrier.
  • Play Recognition (PRC) - The ability to recognize plays. This is a defensive player skill that would seem to be tied into play action passing as well as recognizing the same play calls.
  • Man Coverage (MCV) - Skill of the defender in man coverage.
  • Zone Coverage (ZCV) - Skill of the defender in zone coverage.
  • Pass Block (PBK) - How well a player pass blocks.
  • Run Block (RBK) - How well a player run blocks.
  • Impact Blocking (IBL) - Would seem to be the blockers ability to make a leveling "impact" style block.
  • Run Block Strength (RBS) - How well the player run blocks.
  • Run Block Footwork (RBF) - How well the player maintains footing during a run block.
  • Pass Block Strength (PBS) - How well the player pass blocks.
  • Pass Block Footwork (PBF) - How well the player maintains footing during a pass block.
  • Kick Power (KPW) - A kicker's power. Higher power means longer kicks.
  • Kick Accuracy (KAC) - A kicker's accuracy.
  • Return (RET) - Skill of the player as a punt or kick returner.
  • Stamina (STA) - The player's stamina level. The higher the rating, the more the player can be in the game before he becomes fatigued.
  • Injury (INJ) - The likelihood of an injury. The higher the rating, the less likely a player will get injured.
  • Importance (IMP) - A player's importance to his team.

#1 - Ohio State Buckeyes

  • '05 Record: 10-2 (Beat Notre Dame in Fiesta Bowl)
  • Conference: Big Ten (7-1, t-1st)
  • '05 Offensive Passing Stats: 52nd (225.7 yards per game)
  • '05 Offensive Rushing Stats: 24th (196.7 yards per game)
  • Offense Type: Balanced
  • Run/Pass: 53% Run, 47% Pass
  • Offensive Playcall Style: 54% Conservative, 46% Aggressive
  • Offensive Substitutions: 50% More, 50% Less
  • '05 Defensive Passing Stats: 43rd (207.9 yards allowed per game)
  • '05 Defensive Rushing Stats: 1st (73.4) yards allowed per game)
  • Base Defense: 4-3
  • Defend: 58% Run, 42% Pass
  • Defensive Playcall Style: 60% Aggressive, 40% Conservative
  • Defensive Substitutions: 55% Less, 45% More
  • Offensive Playbook: Ace Big, Ace Big Twin WR, Ace Twin TE, Ace Twin TE WR, Ace Normal Slot, Ace Slot Strong, I-Form Normal, I-Form Twin WR, I-Form Big, Strong I H Pro, Shotgun Split Offset, Shotgun Normal Slot, Shotgun Slot Strong, Shotgun 4WR Spread, Shotgun Trips Strong, Shotgun 5-Wide

Impact Players

PLAYEROVRSPDSTRAWRAGIACCSTAINJJMPTHPTHACARBKTBCVTRKSFAELUSPMJKM
QB #1095866585858694928290886868856060887075

PLAYEROVRSPDSTRAWRAGIACCSTAINJJMPCATCARBKTRBKBCVTRKSFAELUSPMJKM
WR #793994887999998919290624844964035999798

PLAYEROVRSPDSTRAWRAGIACCSTAINJJMPTAKPRSPRCPMVFMVBSHMCVZCV
DT #90946592856572868962888096978596510

The Ohio State Buckeyes last won the national championship in 2002 and are favored to make the run this year. The Buckeyes' impressive offensive statistics leave little surprise that EA Sports has ranked them #1 overall in I-A schools. It's about team speed with the Buckeyes' offensive impact players. QB #10 is lightning quick; mix up the offensive play calls with rollouts, scrambles, and option plays, then look for WR #7 deep to capitalize on his 99 speed, agility, elusiveness, and acceleration.

#2 - Texas Longhorns

  • '05 Record: 13-0 (Beat USC in Rose Bowl; National Champions)
  • Conference: Big 12 (8-0, 1st in South)
  • '05 Offensive Passing Stats: 40th (237.2 yards per game)
  • '05 Offensive Rushing Stats: 2nd (274.9 yards per game)
  • Offense Type: Balanced
  • Run/Pass: 56% Run, 44% Pass
  • Offensive Playcall Style: 54% Conservative, 46% Aggressive
  • Offensive Substitutions: 55% Less, 45% More
  • '05 Defensive Passing Stats: 8th (172.0 yards allowed per game)
  • '05 Defensive Rushing Stats: 33rd (130.9 yards allowed per game)
  • Base Defense: 4-3
  • Defend: 56% Run, 44% Pass
  • Defensive Playcall Style: 50% Conservative, 50% Aggressive
  • Defensive Substitutions: 55% Less, 45% More
  • Offensive Playbook: Ace Big, Ace Big Twin WR, Ace Normal Slot, Ace Slot Strong, Ace Flip Trips, I-Form Normal, I-Form Big, Strong I Normal, Weak I, Weak I Twin WR, Shotgun Ace, Shotgun Normal Slot, Shotgun Normal Offset WK, Shotgun Slot Strong, Shotgun Slot Strg HB Wk, Shotgun Spread Flex

Impact Players

PLAYEROVRSPDSTRAWRAGIACCSTAINJJMPCATCARBKTRBKBCVTRKSFAELUSPMJKM
HB #2589956870939590927065878648918565928585

PLAYEROVRSPDSTRAWRAGIACCSTAINJJMPTAKPRSPRCPMVFMVBSHMCVZCV
LE #80948078827684869062829085859093510

PLAYEROVRSPDSTRAWRAGIACCSTAINJJMPTAKCATPRSPRCPMVFMVBSHMCVZCV
SS #27928968878690929484806290905060807585

The National Champion Texas Longhorns lost a premiere quarterback but remain near the top of NCAA Football 07's best teams.

The Texas Longhorns are coming off an impressive national championship win against repeat champion, the USC Trojans. Despite losing a Heisman candidate quarterback in Vince Young (now with the NFL's Tennessee Titans), the Longhorns enter this NCAA Football 07 season ranked #2 overall. Expect to focus more on the ground game with impact player #25; excellent speed and acceleration give the Longhorns' back the ability to break it outside for a momentum changing gain. The Longhorns' strong defense (two impact players) will keep games close--a perfect match for a consistent ground game.

#3 - Notre Dame Fighting Irish

  • '05 Record: 9-3 (Lost to Ohio State in Fiesta Bowl)
  • Conference: Independents
  • '05 Offensive Passing Stats: 4th (330.3 yards per game)
  • '05 Offensive Rushing Stats: 55th (147.1 yards per game)
  • Offense Type: Balanced
  • Run/Pass: 52% Pass, 48% Run
  • Offensive Playcall Style: 54% Aggressive, 46% Conservative
  • Offensive Substitutions: 55% Less, 45% More
  • '05 Defensive Passing Stats: 103rd (264.6 yards allowed per game)
  • '05 Defensive Rushing Stats: 34th (132.3 yards allowed per game)
  • Base Defense: 4-3
  • Defend: 62% Pass, 38% Run
  • Defensive Playcall Style: 70% Aggressive, 30% Conservative
  • Defensive Substitutions: 55% Less, 45% More
  • Offensive Playbook: Ace Big 3 TE, Ace Big, Ace Normal Slot, Ace Slot Strong, Ace Trips Bunch, Ace Empty 5 WR, I-Form Normal, Split Backs 3 WR, Strong I Normal, Weak I Twin WR, Weak I Twin TE, Shotgun Normal Slot, Shotgun Slot Strong, Shotgun Trio, Shotgun 4 WR Spread, Shotgun Trips Strong, Shotgun 5-Wide
Impact Players

PLAYEROVRSPDSTRAWRAGIACCSTAINJJMPTHPTHACARBKTBCVTRKSFAELUSPMJKM
QB #1097626595626894966894956248504040555055

PLAYEROVRSPDSTRAWRAGIACCSTAINJJMPCATCARBKTRBKBCVTRKSFAELUSPMJKM
WR #8396907093909292969596686852927075888085

PLAYEROVRSPDSTRAWRAGIACCSTAINJJMPTAKCATPRSPRCPMVFMVBSHMCVZCV
SS #9959370859291969484747295857070908596

The Fighting Irish have been on explosive rise the last few seasons: Notre Dame went from 6-6 to 9-3 and their 81st ranked offense went to number 10 in the country. QB #10, a Heisman candidate, leads the Fighting Irish into their championship hopeful season. He's one of the best (if not the best) all-around quarterbacks in NCAA Football 07--good speed, great awareness, and excellent throwing skills. Look to feature impact player WR #83 in the passing game. Defensively the Irish are weaker against the run. Impact defender SS #9 anchors a stronger pass defense.

#4 - USC Trojans

  • '05 Record: 12-1 (Lost to Texas in the Rose Bowl)
  • Conference: Pac-10 (8-0, 1st)
  • '05 Offensive Passing Stats: 5th (319.8 yards per game)
  • '05 Offensive Rushing Stats: 6th (260.0 yards per game)
  • Offense Type: West Coast
  • Run/Pass: 50% Pass, 50% Run
  • Offensive Playcall Style: 62% Aggressive, 38% Conservative
  • Substitutions: 55% More, 45% Less
  • '05 Defensive Passing Stats: 73rd (230.4 yards allowed per game)
  • '05 Defensive Rushing Stats: 31st (130.5 yards allowed per game)
  • Base Defense: 4-3
  • Defend: 51% Run, 49% Pass
  • Defensive Playcall Style: 55% Conservative, 45% Aggressive
  • Defensive Substitutions: 55% More, 45% Less
  • Offensive Playbook: Ace Big, Ace Big Twin WR, Ace Twin TE WR, Ace Normal Slot, Ace Normal, Ace Slot Strong, Ace Trips Bunch, Ace Spread, I-Form Normal, I-Form Twin WR, I-Form Big, Split Backs Normal, Strong I Normal, Strong I Twin WR, Weak I Normal, Weak I Close
Impact Players

PLAYEROVRSPDSTRAWRAGIACCSTAINJJMPCATCARBKTRBKBCVTRKSFAELUSPMJKM
WR #896946288929593949896625948906055928085

PLAYEROVRSPDSTRAWRAGIACCSTAINJJMPCATCARBKTRBKBCVTRKSFAELUSPMJKM
WR #293956290949692889092655648896050938592

PLAYEROVRSPDSTRAWRAGIACCSTAINJJMPTAKPRSPRCPMVFMVBSHMCVZCV
LE #96948480767888879280769090859985510

The loss of two Heisman trophy winners would seem to indicate a "rebuilding" year--but here are the USC Trojans, deservedly ranked #4 in NCAA Football 07. The Trojans lost a Heisman QB and RB but still have two impact receivers to dominate opposing corners. Both receivers are equally skilled and a threat to shift momentum on any play. Note that the Trojans lack Shotgun formation in their offensive playbook. Don't let that discourage airing it out--it enables the Trojans to be very creative offensively. Defenses hoping to shutdown WR #8 and #2 could be burned by the Trojans' other skilled offensive personnel.

#5 - LSU Tigers

  • '05 Record: 11-2 (Beat Miami in the Peach Bowl)
  • Conference: 7-1 (t-1st in West)
  • '05 Offensive Passing Stats: 55th (224.0 yards per game)
  • '05 Offensive Rushing Stats: 52nd (150.1 yards per game)
  • Offense Type: Balanced
  • Run/Pass: 50% Pass, 50% Run
  • Offensive Playcall Style: 50% Aggressive, 50% Conservative
  • Offensive Substitutions: 55% More, 45% Less
  • '05 Defensive Passing Stats: 11th (175.3 yards allowed per game)
  • '05 Defensive Rushing Stats: 6th (91.5 yards allowed per game)
  • Base Defense: 4-3
  • Defend: 59% Run, 41% Pass
  • Defensive Playcall Style: 60% Conservative, 40% Aggressive
  • Defensive Substitutions: 55% More, 45% Less
  • Offensive Playbook: Ace Big, Ace Normal Slot, Ace Slot Strong, Ace Trips Bunch, I-Form Normal, I-Form Twin WR, I-Form Big, Strong I Normal, Weak I Normal, Weak I Twin WR, Shotgun 2RB 3WR, Shotgun Normal Flex, Shotgun Slot Strong, Shotgun Double Flex, Shotgun Trips Strong

Impact Players

PLAYEROVRSPDSTRAWRAGIACCSTAINJJMPTAKPRSPRCPMVFMVBSHMCVZCV
LE #94927878857682858868808588858980510

PLAYEROVRSPDSTRAWRAGIACCSTAINJJMPCATCARBKTRBKBCVTRKSFAELUSPMJKM
WR #8090896586889293929689656552706560756570

PLAYEROVRSPDSTRAWRAGIACCSTAINJJMPTAKCATPRSPRCPMVFMVBSHMCVZCV
FS #30999068909291979692786894976575808998

The fifth ranked LSU Tigers failed to win the SEC Championship game but ended the season on a high note by clobbering the Miami Hurricanes in the bowl season. The Tigers have one of the toughest road schedules in the NCAA--they face ranked Auburn, Florida, and Tennessee on the road. Offensively the Tigers are certainly solid but without a momentum-changing superstar (WR #80 is their offensive impact player). Defense is the team's strong suit--two impact players including the best defensive back in the game in free safety #30.

#6 - Florida Gators

  • '05 Record: 9-3 (Beat Iowa in the Outback Bowl)
  • Conference: SEC (5-3, t-2nd in East)
  • '05 Offensive Passing Stats: 51st (226.7 yards per game)
  • '05 Offensive Rushing Stats: 56th (146.8 yards per game)
  • Offense Type: Spread Offense
  • Run/Pass: 50% Pass, 50% Run
  • Offensive Playcall Style: 73% Aggressive, 27% Conservative
  • Offensive Substitutions: 60% Less, 40% More
  • '05 Defensive Passing Stats: 38th (204.9 yards allowed per game)
  • '05 Defensive Rushing Stats: 10th (94.9 yards allowed per game)
  • Base Defense: 4-3
  • Defend: 52% Pass, 48% Run
  • Defensive Playcall Style: 55% Conservative, 45% Aggressive
  • Defensive Substitutions: 60% More, 40% Less
  • Offensive Playbook: Ace Big, Ace Bunch TE, Ace Tight, I-Form Twin WR, Shotgun Split Twins, Shotgun 2RB 3WR, Shotgun Normal Slot, Shotgun Wing Trips, Shotgun Slot Strong, Shotgun Slot Strg HB Wk, Shotgun Trio, Shotgun Trips Bunch, Shotgun Tight, Shotgun 4WR Spread, Shotgun Flip Trips, Shotgun Trips Strong, Shotgun 5WR Trio

Impact Players

PLAYEROVRSPDSTRAWRAGIACCSTAINJJMPTHPTHACARBKTBCVTRKSFAELUSPMJKM
QB #1294705688707496967490936552553025603555

PLAYEROVRSPDSTRAWRAGIACCSTAINJJMPTAKPRSPRCPMVFMVBSHMCVZCV
DT #44946589856276788840906580929385510

PLAYEROVRSPDSTRAWRAGIACCSTAINJJMPTAKCATPRSPRCPMVFMVBSHMCVZCV
MLB #40958776878590929478956297947570965070

The Florida Gators, led by QB #12, must find more consistency on offense to navigate the tough SEC schedule.

A new head coach and new offensive scheme left Florida with similar results: some big victories and some head-scratching losses. But the Gators hope to navigate a tough schedule (six ranked teams to begin the season!) and challenge for the SEC title. Offensively, the Gators spread the ball around in wide open formations: 13 different Shotgun formations. QB #12 is the leader on offense. A highly recruited incoming freshman provides additional depth at the quarterback position. Both of the Gators' impact defenders are highly ranked.

#7 - Auburn Tigers

  • '05 Record: 9-3 (Lost to Wisconsin in the Capital One Bowl)
  • Conference: SEC (7-1, t-1st in West)
  • '05 Offensive Passing Stats: 70th (215.8 yards per game)
  • '05 Offensive Rushing Stats: 25th (194.1 yards per game)
  • Offense Type: West Coast
  • Run/Pass: 60% Run, 40% Pass
  • Offensive Playcall Style: 62% Conservative, 38% Aggressive
  • Offensive Substitutions: 60% More, 40% Less
  • '05 Defensive Passing Stats: 32nd (199.0 yards allowed per game)
  • '05 Defensive Rushing Stats: 22nd (116.3 yards allowed per game)
  • Base Defense: 4-3
  • Defend: 53% Run, 47% Pass
  • Defensive Playcall Style: 50% Aggressive, 50% Conservative
  • Defensive Substitutions: 55% More, 45% Less
  • Offensive Playbook: Ace Big 3TE, Ace Big, Ace Big Twin WR, Ace Normal Slot, Ace Slot Strong, Ace Trips Bunch, I-Form Normal, I-Form Twin WR, I-Form Twin TE Wing, Strong I Normal, Strong I Twin WR, Weak I Normal, Shotgun Normal Slot, Shotgun Slot Strong, Shotgun Double Flex, Shotgun Flip Trips, Shotgun Trips Strong

Impact Players

PLAYEROVRSPDSTRAWRAGIACCSTAINJJMPTHPTHACARBKTBCVTRKSFAELUSPMJKM
QB #1289685282686894926287934844754541747366

PLAYEROVRSPDSTRAWRAGIACCSTAINJJMPCATCARBKTRBKBCVTRKSFAELUSPMJKM
HB #2394936892929592927668878748719092929091

PLAYEROVRSPDSTRAWRAGIACCSTAINJJMPTAKCATPRSPRCPMVFMVBSHMCVZCV
ROLB #35908670888687929684747283806757697884

The Auburn Tigers are two years removed from an undefeated season and are looking to build on last year's disappointing 9-3 finish (and loss to Wisconsin in the Capital One Bowl). HB #23 is the star on offense: another in a recent line of high caliber Auburn running backs. Feed him the ball in Auburn's strong set of running formations (Ace, I-Form, Strong I, and Weak I). The receiving group is young but capable. ROLB #35 is the impact player on defense; he has actually switched positions since last year where he was at safety.

#8 - Oklahoma Sooners

  • '05 Record: 8-4 (Beat Oregon in the Holiday Bowl)
  • Conference: Big 12 (6-2, t-2nd in South)
  • '05 Offensive Passing Stats: 94th (177.6 yards per game)
  • '05 Offensive Rushing Stats: 33rd (177.5 yards per game)
  • Offense Type: Balanced
  • Run/Pass: 55% Run, 45% Pass
  • Offensive Playcall Style: 50% Aggressive, 50% Conservative
  • Offensive Substitutions: 50% More, 50% Less
  • '05 Defensive Passing Stats: 56th (216.1 yards allowed per game)
  • '05 Defensive Rushing Stats: 4th (90.6 yards allowed per game)
  • Base Defense: 4-3
  • Defend: 59% Pass, 41% Run
  • Defensive Playcall Style: 65% Aggressive, 35% Conservative
  • Defensive Substitutions: 50% More, 50% Less
  • Offensive Playbook: Ace Big, Ace Normal Slot, Ace Slot Strong, I-Form Normal, I-Form Twin TE Wing, Strong I Normal, Strong I Twin WR, Weak I Normal, Shotgun Normal Slot, Shotgun Normal Flex, Shotgun Slot Strong, Shotgun Trio, Shotgun Trips Bunch, Shotgun Spread Flex, Shotgun Trips Strong, Shotgun 5-Wide

Impact Players

PLAYEROVRSPDSTRAWRAGIACCSTAINJJMPCATCARBKTRBKBCVTRKSFAELUSPMJKM
HB #2898938087929696878462979844979897908585

PLAYEROVRSPDSTRAWRAGIACCSTAINJJMPTAKCATPRSPRCPMVFMVBSHMCVZCV
ROLB #42968476888286939374916296987575976070

PLAYEROVRSPDSTRAWRAGIACCSTAINJJMPTAKPRSPRCPMVFMVBSHMCVZCV
RE #58927476887680859072849090858090510

The dominance of the Oklahoma Sooners was tarnished last season, but expect the perennial championship contender to contend once again. A young offense is led by an impact player at halfback, HB #28--he's one of the best in NCAA Football 07. He boosts excellent speed, acceleration, break tackle, trucking, elusiveness, and a near perfect stiff arm rating (don't forget to utilize those special moves!). Most link a strong defense with the Sooners and this year will be no exception (65% aggressive defensive play calling in dynasty mode!). Two impact defenders, ROLB #42 and RE #58, led an extremely stiff squad.

#9 - West Virginia Mountaineers

  • '05 Record: 11-1 (Beat Georgia in the Sugar Bowl)
  • Conference: Big East (7-0, 1st)
  • '05 Offensive Passing Stats: 115th (116.5 yards per game)
  • '05 Offensive Rushing Stats: 4th (272.4 yards per game)
  • Offense Type: Spread Offense
  • Run/Pass: 63% Run, 37% Pass
  • Offensive Playcall Style: 51% Aggressive, 49% Conservative
  • Offensive Substitutions: 55% More, 45% Less
  • '05 Defensive Passing Stats: 34th (201.1 yards allowed per game)
  • '05 Defensive Rushing Stats: 19th (109.7 yards allowed per game)
  • Base Defense: 4-3
  • Defend: 54% Pass, 46% Run
  • Defensive Playcall Style: 60% Aggressive, 40% Conservative
  • Defensive Substitutions: 55% Less, 45% More
  • Offensive Playbook: Ace Big, Ace Normal Slot, Ace Spread, Ace Flip Trips, I-Form Normal, Strong I Normal, Weak I Twin WR, Weak I Big, Shotgun 2RB 3WR, Shotgun Normal Flex, Shotgun Slot Strong, Shotgun Slot Strg HB Wk, Shotgun Tight, Shotgun Trio, Shotgun 4WR Spread, Shotgun Trips Strong, Shotgun 5-Wide

Impact Players

PLAYEROVRSPDSTRAWRAGIACCSTAINJJMPTHPTHACARBKTBCVTRKSFAELUSPMJKM
QB #591856276878794928589877674876772858886

PLAYEROVRSPDSTRAWRAGIACCSTAINJJMPCATCARBKTRBKBCVTRKSFAELUSPMJKM
HB #1092947278939692948068898744978988959497

PLAYEROVRSPDSTRAWRAGIACCSTAINJJMPTAKCATPRSPRCPMVFMVBSHMCVZCV
ROLB #43958282908086909276905295957972818167

The West Virginia Mountaineers impressed many with a 7-0 Big East mark, an 11-1 overall mark, and an exciting bowl win over the SEC champion Georgia Bulldogs. The Mountaineers' impact quarterback and running back combine to create a varied offense--both of these position players are extremely fast opening up the rollouts, screens, options, and assortment of outside run plays.

#10 - Louisville Cardinals

  • '05 Record: 9-3 (Lost to Virginia Tech in the Gator Bowl)
  • Conference: Big East (5-2, 2nd)
  • '05 Offensive Passing Stats: 13th (293.6 yards per game)
  • '05 Offensive Rushing Stats: 30th (188.5 yards per game)
  • Offense Type: Balanced
  • Run/Pass: 50% Pass, 50% Run
  • Offensive Playcall Style: 69% Aggressive, 31% Conservative
  • Offensive Substitutions: 55% Less, 45% More
  • '05 Defensive Passing Stats: 46th (210.0 yards allowed per game)
  • '05 Defensive Rushing Stats: 21st (114.0 yards allowed per game)
  • Base Defense: 4-3
  • Defend: 54% Pass, 46% Run
  • Defensive Playcall Style: 70% Aggressive, 30% Conservative
  • Defensive Substitutions: 50% More, 50% Less
  • Offensive Playbook: Ace Jumbo Heavy, Ace Big, Ace Normal Slot, Ace Slot Strong, I-Form Normal, I-Form Twin WR, Strong I Normal, Strong I Twin TE, Weak I Twin WR, Shotgun 2RB 3WR, Shotgun Normal Flex, Shotgun Slot Strong, Shotgun Trio, Shotgun Spread Flex, Shotgun Trips Strong, Shotgun 5WR Trio

Impact Players

PLAYEROVRSPDSTRAWRAGIACCSTAINJJMPTHPTHACARBKTBCVTRKSFAELUSPMJKM
QB #1292626285626595846895935648453530503045

PLAYEROVRSPDSTRAWRAGIACCSTAINJJMPCATCARBKTRBKBCVTRKSFAELUSPMJKM
HB #1994897887909388888774909344889592858085

PLAYEROVRSPDSTRAWRAGIACCSTAINJJMPTAKCATPRSPRCPMVFMVBSHMCVZCV
MLB #10898678848486908874875980656060854050

The Big East title should be decided by the showdown between Louisville and West Virginia.

Louisville's veteran offensive personnel will likely become one of the most potent scoring machines in the NCAA. Although Big East rival West Virginia outranks them at the start of the season in NCAA Football 07, the Cardinals do face their Big East rival at home. Two impact players on offense lead the way. QB #12 is a solid pocket passer with high throw power and accuracy; and HB #19 is a steady running back with excellent power moves, including high trucking and stiff arm statistics.

#11 - Miami Hurricanes

  • '05 Record: 9-3 (Lost to LSU in the Peach Bowl)
  • Conference: ACC (6-2, 2nd in Coastal)
  • '05 Offensive Passing Stats: 71st (215.5 yards per game)
  • '05 Offensive Rushing Stats: 70th (137.6 yards per game)
  • Offense Type: Balanced
  • Run/Pass: 52% Run, 48% Pass
  • Offensive Playcall Style: 60% Conservative, 40% Aggressive
  • Offensive Substitutions: 60% Less, 40% More
  • '05 Defensive Passing Stats: 1st (152.2 yards allowed per game)
  • '05 Defensive Rushing Stats: 23rd (117.9 yards allowed per game)
  • Base Defense: 4-3
  • Defend: 56% Run, 44% Pass
  • Defensive Playcall Style: 50% Aggressive, 50% Conservative
  • Defensive Substitutions: 50% More, 50% Less
  • Offensive Playbook: Ace Big, Ace Normal Slot, Ace Slot Strong, Ace Bunch TE, Ace Tight, Ace Empty 5 WR, I-Form Normal, I-Form 3WR, Strong I Normal, Weak I Twin WR, Shotgun 2RB 3WR, Shotgun Normal Flex, Shotgun Slot Strg HB Wk, Shotgun Trio, Shotgun Spread Flex, Shotgun Trips Strong

Impact Players

PLAYEROVRSPDSTRAWRAGIACCSTAINJJMPCATCARBKTPBKBCVTRKSFAELUSPMJKM
TE #8293847276828592878285686856757065705565

PLAYEROVRSPDSTRAWRAGIACCSTAINJJMPTAKPRSPRCPMVFMVBSHMCVZCV
LE #98957884807086848768848085759680510

PLAYEROVRSPDSTRAWRAGIACCSTAINJJMPTAKCATPRSPRCPMVFMVBSHMCVZCV
FS #19969162878892929487806596904070859094

Offensive inconsistency has hindered the Miami Hurricanes in the past few seasons. The Canes ranked no better than 70th in rushing or passing statistics. Defensively the Hurricanes are much stronger: 1st overall in pass defense last year and 23rd in rush defense. The defense should retain that high level of play with six returning starters and two impact players, LE #98 and FS #19--both highly ranked at their positions. TE #82 is the sole impact player on offense. It seems as if the Hurricanes have an impact tight end each and every season. Work him into your play calling to open up routes for Miami's receivers and backs.

#12 - Florida State Seminoles

  • '05 Record: 8-5 (Lost to Penn State in the Orange Bowl)
  • Conference: ACC (5-3, t-1st Atlantic)
  • '05 Offensive Passing Stats: 18th (282.6 yards per game)
  • '05 Offensive Rushing Stats: 109th (94.0 yards per game)
  • Offense Type: Balanced
  • Run/Pass: 57% Run, 43% Pass
  • Offensive Playcall Style: 52% Conservative, 48% Aggressive
  • Offensive Substitutions: 55% More, 45% Less
  • '05 Defensive Passing Stats: 33rd (200.8 yards allowed per game)
  • '05 Defensive Rushing Stats: 18th (108.4 yards allowed per game)
  • Base Defense: 4-3
  • Defend: 58% Pass, 42% Run
  • Defensive Playcall Style: 50% Aggressive, 50% Conservative
  • Defensive Substitutions: 60% Less, 40% More
  • Offensive Playbook: Ace Twin TE, Ace Slot Strong, Ace Normal Slot, Ace Trips Bunch, Ace Flip Trips, I-Form Normal, I-Form 3WR, Strong I Twin WR, Strong I Twin TE, Weak I Normal, Weak I 3 WR, Shotgun Split Offset, Shotgun Normal Flex, Shotgun Slot Strong, Shotgun Spread Flex, Shotgun Trips

Impact Players

PLAYEROVRSPDSTRAWRAGIACCSTAINJJMPCATCARBKTRBKBCVTRKSFAELUSPMJKM
HB #2888966284979792898576767440926040989797

PLAYEROVRSPDSTRAWRAGIACCSTAINJJMPTAKCATPRSPRCPMVFMVBSHMCVZCV
LOLB #83888574788288888878826580707095753040

PLAYEROVRSPDSTRAWRAGIACCSTAINJJMPTAKCATPRSPRCPMVFMVBSHMCVZCV
ROLB #7958278908084939072925696957060855060

Despite a mistake-filled 8-5 season, the Florida State Seminoles won the ACC championship game and played in a BCS bowl (eventually losing to Penn State in the Orange Bowl). Florida State remains strongest on defense with two impact linebackers. Speedy HB #28 is the offensive standout (96 speed, 97 agility, and 97 acceleration but not much in the way of power moves). The ground game ranked 109th last season, which will need to improve to take pressure off a young quarterback.

#13 - Penn State Nittany Lions

  • '05 Record: 11-1 (Beat Florida State in the Orange Bowl)
  • Conference: Big Ten (7-1, t-1st)
  • '05 Offensive Passing Stats: 74th (208.8 yards per game)
  • '05 Offensive Rushing Stats: 14th (212.8 yards per game)
  • Offense Type: Balanced
  • Run/Pass: 52% Run, 48% Pass
  • Offensive Playcall Style: 52% Aggressive, 48% Conservative
  • Offensive Substitutions: 65% More, 35% Less
  • '05 Defensive Passing Stats: 50th (211.7 yards allowed per game)
  • '05 Defensive Rushing Stats: 7th (93.0 yards allowed per game)
  • Base Defense: 4-3
  • Defend: 59% Run, 41% Pass
  • Defensive Playcall Style: 50% Aggressive, 50% Conservative
  • Defensive Substitutions: 55% Less, 45% More
  • Offensive Playbook: Ace Big, Ace Normal Slot, Ace Normal, Ace Slot Strong, Ace Flip Trips, I-Form Normal, I-Form Twin WR, I-Form Big, Strong I Normal, Weak I H Pro, Shotgun Split Twins, Shotgun 2RB 3WR, Shotgun Normal, Shotgun Slot Strong, Shotgun Double Flex, Shotgun Trips Strong

Impact Players

PLAYEROVRSPDSTRAWRAGIACCSTAINJJMPCATCARBKTRBKBCVTRKSFAELUSPMJKM
HB #2691917686889290887476828944939288847580

PLAYEROVRSPDSTRAWRAGIACCSTAINJJMPCATCARBKTRBKBCVTRKSFAELUSPMJKM
WR #287975674959892848588625248945040989899

PLAYEROVRSPDSTRAWRAGIACCSTAINJJMPTAKCATPRSPRCPMVFMVBSHMCVZCV
LOLB #31988276948285958472946298997088986070

The Penn State Nittany Lions will need big plays from their impact running back.

Now in his 41st season as head coach, Joe Paterno has led the Penn State Nittany Lions back into national prominence. A stellar 11-1 season ended with a victory over the Florida State Seminoles in the Orange Bowl. Penn State will have a tough early road schedule with trips to South Bend to face the Notre Dame Fighting Irish and to Ohio State to challenge the #1 ranked Buckeyes. Take pressure off a young quarterback with impact players HB #26 and WR #2. Use high percentage pocket passing to involve these stars into your offensive gameplan. On defense, LOLB #31 is the standout--he's one of the best linebackers in the game (won the Butkus Award) with a 98 overall rating but leads a fairly young defensive squad.

#14 - Michigan Wolverines

  • '05 Record: 7-5 (Lost to Nebraska in the Alamo Bowl)
  • Conference: Big Ten (5-3, t-3rd)
  • '05 Offensive Passing Stats: 61st (222.7 yards per game)
  • '05 Offensive Rushing Stats: 44th (161.6 yards per game)
  • Offense Type: Balanced
  • Run/Pass: 52% Run, 48% Pass
  • Offensive Playcall Style: 50% Aggressive, 50% Conservative
  • Offensive Substitutions: 55% Less, 45% More
  • '05 Defensive Passing Stats: 42nd (207.8 yards allowed per game)
  • '05 Defensive Rushing Stats: 41st (137.3 yards allowed per game)
  • Base Defense: 4-3
  • Defend: 56% Pass, 44% Run
  • Defensive Playcall Style: 65% Aggressive, 35% Conservative
  • Defensive Substitutions: 60% Less, 40% More
  • Offensive Playbook: Ace Big, Ace Big Twin WR, Ace Twin TE WR, Ace Normal Slot, Ace Normal, Ace Slot Strong, Ace Trips Bunch, Ace Double Flex, Ace Flip Trips, I-Form Normal, I-Form Twin WR, I-Form Big, Strong I Normal, Strong I Twin WR, Strong I Twin TE, Weak I Twin WR

Impact Players

PLAYEROVRSPDSTRAWRAGIACCSTAINJJMPCATCARBKTRBKBCVTRKSFAELUSPMJKM
HB #2092906884919394906576918748978560907580

PLAYEROVRSPDSTRAWRAGIACCSTAINJJMPCATCARBKTRBKBCVTRKSFAELUSPMJKM
WR #1591954888969795928888625944974535989095

PLAYEROVRSPDSTRAWRAGIACCSTAINJJMPTAKCATPRSPRCPMVFMVBSHMCVZCV
LOLB #56928578878289928878845280758097753555

The Michigan Wolverines hope to right a ship that has seen weak conference records, losses to rivals, and bowl game defeats. Six returning starters on offense should build on last season's mediocre statistics. HB #20 and WR #15 are the impact players on offense. Establish a ground and short passing game with HB #20 then look to hit WR #15 with deep passes out of typical run formations (I-Form, Strong I, Weak I). Six starters also return on defense where LOLB #56 leads the way.

#15 - Cal Golden Bears

  • '05 Record: 8-4 (Beat BYU in the Las Vegas Bowl)
  • Conference: Pac-10 (4-4, t-4th)
  • '05 Offensive Passing Stats: 90th (192.7 yards per game)
  • '05 Offensive Rushing Stats: 9th (235.3 yards per game)
  • Offense Type: West Coast
  • Run/Pass: 52% Pass, 48% Run
  • Offensive Playcall Style: 65% Aggressive, 35% Conservative
  • Offensive Substitutions: 55% Less, 45% More
  • '05 Defensive Passing Stats: 80th (240.4 yards allowed per game)
  • '05 Defensive Rushing Stats: 24th (119.2 yards allowed per game)
  • Base Defense: 4-3
  • Defend: 55% Pass, 45% Run
  • Defensive Playcall Style: 70% Aggressive, 30% Conservative
  • Defensive Substitutions: 50% More, 50% Less
  • Offensive Playbook: Ace Big, Ace Big Twin WR, Ace Normal Slot, Ace Normal, Ace Slot Strong, Ace Trips TE, Ace Trey Open, Empty 5 WR, I-Form Twin WR, Split Backs 3WR, Strong I Normal, Strong I Twin WR, Weak I Normal, Weak I Twin WR, Weak I Twin TE, Shotgun 4WR Spread

Impact Players

PLAYEROVRSPDSTRAWRAGIACCSTAINJJMPCATCARBKTRBKBCVTRKSFAELUSPMJKM
HB #1095927684899290928265929648939695877080

PLAYEROVRSPDSTRAWRAGIACCSTAINJJMPTAKPRSPRCPMVFMVBSHMCVZCV
DT #52946588866580808868888085857580510

PLAYEROVRSPDSTRAWRAGIACCSTAINJJMPTAKCATPRSPRCPMVFMVBSHMCVZCV
CB #13959356949494918892627470752030459797

Expect the Cal Golden Bears to challenge #4 ranked USC for the Pac-10 title. The Golden Bears return fifteen starters and feature one of the best running backs in the game, impact player HB #10. Cal is also strong defensively with two impact players, a strong defensive tackle in DT #52 and a premiere shutdown corner CB #13 (don't hesitate to keep him in man coverage). Mark the date on your calendars: November 18th, where the Pac-10 title will likely be decided at USC.

#16 - Georgia Bulldogs

  • '05 Record: 10-3 (Lost to West Virginia in the Sugar Bowl)
  • Conference: SEC (6-2, 1st in East)
  • '05 Offensive Passing Stats: 49th (229.0 yards per game)
  • '05 Offensive Rushing Stats: 43rd (162.2 yards per game)
  • Offense Type: Balanced
  • Run/Pass: 54% Run, 46% Pass
  • Offensive Playcall Style: 58% Conservative, 42% Aggressive
  • Offensive Substitutions: 55% Less, 45% More
  • '05 Defensive Passing Stats: 7th (169.6 yards allowed per game)
  • '05 Defensive Rushing Stats: 52nd (143.9 yards allowed per game)
  • Base Defense: 4-3
  • Defend: 57% Pass, 43% Run
  • Defensive Playcall Style: 70% Aggressive, 30% Conservative
  • Defensive Substitutions: 50% More, 50% Less
  • Offensive Playbook: Ace Big, Ace Normal Slot, Ace Spread, Ace Flip Trips, Ace Empty 4 WR, I-Form Normal, I-Form Twin TE Wing, Split Backs Normal, Strong I Normal, Strong I Twin WR, Weak I Normal, Weak I Twin TE, Shotgun Split Offset, Shotgun Slot Strong, Shotgun Trio, Shotgun Spread Flex

Impact Players

PLAYEROVRSPDSTRAWRAGIACCSTAINJJMPCATCARBKTRBKBCVTRKSFAELUSPMJKM
HB #2088935982949592896874867640806050968596

PLAYEROVRSPDSTRAWRAGIACCSTAINJJMPTAKPRSPRCPMVFMVBSHMCVZCV
RE #94948472858490869382748080859780510

PLAYEROVRSPDSTRAWRAGIACCSTAINJJMPTAKCATPRSPRCPMVFMVBSHMCVZCV
SS #25919259889192908885706590903055608490

The World's Largest Cocktail Party takes place between Florida and Georgia in Jacksonville, Florida.

The Georgia Bulldogs may have won the SEC championship last year but this season begins with question marks--a rather inexperienced quarterback assumes the leadership role. HB #20 is the impact player on offense; his ratings are decent but not explosive. The Bulldogs are stronger defensively with two stars, RE #94 and SS #25. The Bulldogs have arguably the best ends in the SEC--they'll need them to contend in the toughest conference in the nation.

#17 - Iowa Hawkeyes

  • '05 Record: 7-5 (Lost to Florida in the Outback Bowl)
  • Conference: Big Ten (5-3, t-3rd)
  • '05 Offensive Passing Stats: 27th (257.8 yards per game)
  • '05 Offensive Rushing Stats: 35th (174.7 yards per game)
  • Offense Type: Balanced
  • Run/Pass: 50% Pass, 50% Run
  • Offensive Playcall Style: 55% Aggressive, 45% Conservative
  • Offensive Substitutions: 55% Less, 45% More
  • '05 Defensive Passing Stats: 96th (256.7 yards allowed per game)
  • '05 Defensive Rushing Stats: 29th (126.0 yards allowed per game)
  • Base Defense: 4-3
  • Defend: 67% Pass, 33% Run
  • Defensive Playcall Style: 65% Conservative, 35% Aggressive
  • Defensive Substitutions: 55% More, 45% Less
  • Offensive Playbook: Ace Big, Ace Big Twin WR, Ace Twin TE, Ace Twin TE WR, Ace Normal Slot, Ace Slot Strong, I-Form Normal, I-Form Twin WR, I-Form 3WR, I-Form Big, I-Form Twin TE Wing, Strong I Normal, Strong I 3WR, Weak I Normal, Shotgun Normal Slot, Shotgun Slot Strong

Impact Players

PLAYEROVRSPDSTRAWRAGIACCSTAINJJMPTHPTHACARBKTBCVTRKSFAELUSPMJKM
QB #593655290687095926593904844503025504050

PLAYEROVRSPDSTRAWRAGIACCSTAINJJMPCATCARBKTRBKBCVTRKSFAELUSPMJKM
HB #2190937680909290727070878844909091757080

PLAYEROVRSPDSTRAWRAGIACCSTAINJJMPTAKPRSPRCPMVFMVBSHMCVZCV
RE #92908076727486809078787565808585510

The Iowa Hawkeyes disappointed in 2005 with a 7-5 record and a bowl loss to Florida in the Outback Bowl. QB #5 and HB #21 lead an offense that hopes to perform better in the tightly contested Big Ten conference. QB #5 is one of the best pocket passers in the game, but don't expect much mobility. Leave that to speedy HB #21; he lacks the special move abilities of some of the game's more skilled backs but he's a big threat out of the backfield. On defense, RE #92 is the impact player.

#18 - Tennessee Volunteers

  • '05 Record: 5-6
  • Conference: SEC (3-5, t-4th in East)
  • '05 Offensive Passing Stats: 85th (198.0 yards per game)
  • '05 Offensive Rushing Stats: 80th (128.3 yards per game)
  • Offense Type: Balanced
  • Run/Pass: 53% Run, 47% Pass
  • Offensive Playcall Style: 53% Conservative, 47% Aggressive
  • Offensive Substitutions: 65% More, 35% Less
  • '05 Defensive Passing Stats: 54th (215.7 yards allowed per game)
  • '05 Defensive Rushing Stats: 2nd (82.5 yards allowed per game)
  • Base Defense: 4-3
  • Defend: 56% Pass, 44% Run
  • Defensive Playcall Style: 50% Aggressive, 50% Conservative
  • Defensive Substitutions: 60% More, 40% Less
  • Offensive Playbook: Ace Big, Ace Normal, Ace Bunch TE, Ace Tight, Ace Spread, I-Form Normal, I-Form Twin WR, I-Form 3WR, Full House Normal Wide, Strong I Twin WR, Strong I Twin TE, Weak I Normal, Weak I 3WR, Shotgun Split Offset, Shotgun Slot Strong, Shotgun 4WR Spread, Shotgun Trips Strong

Impact Players

PLAYEROVRSPDSTRAWRAGIACCSTAINJJMPCATCARBKTRBKBCVTRKSFAELUSPMJKM
HB #2789917474889292908068888948909189757575

PLAYEROVRSPDSTRAWRAGIACCSTAINJJMPTAKPRSPRCPMVFMVBSHMCVZCV
DT #92946295805965809052957590906596510

PLAYEROVRSPDSTRAWRAGIACCSTAINJJMPTAKCATPRSPRCPMVFMVBSHMCVZCV
FS #33899252749495929490627280853540609093

The Tennessee Volunteers hope to forget one of the worst seasons in recent memory--5-6 overall record, 3-5 in the SEC, and no bowl game. But it never gets easier in the tough SEC where Tennessee will have to compete against Florida, Alabama, Georgia, and LSU (and Tennessee opens an out of conference schedule with the tough Cal Golden Bears).

#19 - Arizona State Sun Devils

  • '05 Record: 7-5 (Beat Rutgers in the Insight Bowl)
  • Conference: Pac-10 (4-4, t-4th)
  • '05 Offensive Passing Stats: 3rd (373.4 yards per game)
  • '05 Offensive Rushing Stats: 58th (145.7 yards per game)
  • Offense Type: Balanced
  • Run/Pass: 56% Pass, 44% Run
  • Offensive Playcall Style: 62% Aggressive, 38% Conservative
  • Offensive Substitutions: 60% More, 40% Less
  • '05 Defensive Passing Stats: 112th (289.0 yards allowed per game)
  • '05 Defensive Rushing Stats: 89th (179.8 yards allowed per game)
  • Base Defense: 4-3
  • Defend: 53% Run, 47% Pass
  • Defensive Playcall Style: 65% Conservative, 35% Aggressive
  • Defensive Substitutions: 60% Less, 40% More
  • Offensive Playbook: Ace Big, Ace Big Twin WR, Ace Twin TE, Ace Twin TE WR, Ace Big Wing, Ace Normal Slot, Ace Normal, Ace Slot Strong, Ace Trips Bunch, Ace Spread, Ace Trey Open, I-Form Normal, I-Form Twin TE Wing, I-Form Big, Strong I Normal, Strong I Twin TE

Impact Players

PLAYEROVRSPDSTRAWRAGIACCSTAINJJMPTHPTHACARBKTBCVTRKSFAELUSPMJKM
QB #992626586626592846595905262404535453045

PLAYEROVRSPDSTRAWRAGIACCSTAINJJMPCATCARBKTPBKBCVTRKSFAELUSPMJKM
TE #8695847482848687888488686848706055655060

PLAYEROVRSPDSTRAWRAGIACCSTAINJJMPTAKCATPRSPRCPMVFMVBSHMCVZCV
SS #5918872878590929084766270802535806070

Arizona State's impact quarterback and tight end can be a powerful tandum.

The Arizona State Sun Devils hope to contend in the Pac-10 but it may have to be done on the road: the Sun Devils face the conference elite, USC and California on the road (not to mention in state rival Arizona to close out the season). Impact player QB #9 leads offense; he's a pocket passer with a 95 throw power rating. Make sure you work TE #86 into your passing scheme. He's one of the best rated in the game and an impact player on your offense.

#20 - Nebraska Cornhuskers

  • '05 Record: 8-4 (Beat Michigan in the Alamo Bowl)
  • Conference: Big 12 (4-4, t-2nd in North)
  • '05 Offensive Passing Stats: 54th (224.3 yards per game)
  • '05 Offensive Rushing Stats: 107th (96.0 yards per game)
  • Offense Type: West Coast
  • Run/Pass: 50% Pass, 50% Run
  • Offensive Playcall Style: 57% Aggressive, 43% Conservative
  • Offensive Substitutions: 55% Less, 45% More
  • '05 Defensive Passing Stats: 43rd (207.9 yards allowed per game)
  • '05 Defensive Rushing Stats: 26th (124.3 yards allowed per game)
  • Base Defense: 4-3
  • Defend: 54% Run, 46% Pass
  • Defensive Playcall Style: 60% Conservative, 40% Aggressive
  • Defensive Substitutions: 55% More, 45% Less
  • Offensive Playbook: Ace Big, Ace Big Twin WR, Ace Twin TE, Ace Twin TE WR, Ace Slot Strong, Ace Trips Bunch, Ace 4WR, I-Form Normal, I-Form Big, Strong I Normal, Weak I Normal, Weak I Twin WR, Weak I Twin TE, Shotgun Split Offset, Shotgun Normal Slot, Shotgun Trey Open

Impact Players

PLAYEROVRSPDSTRAWRAGIACCSTAINJJMPCATCARBKTRBKBCVTRKSFAELUSPMJKM
WR #8387885985909190928888625648805545927585

PLAYEROVRSPDSTRAWRAGIACCSTAINJJMPTAKCATPRSPRCPMVFMVBSHMCVZCV
LOLB #34918076887892939274847090885565808080

PLAYEROVRSPDSTRAWRAGIACCSTAINJJMPTAKPRSPRCPMVFMVBSHMCVZCV
RE #90957487877078869059869295937580510

In order to compete against Texas and Oklahoma for the Big 12 title, Nebraska must improve on offense (107th in rushing is not the Nebraska college football fans once knew). WR #83 is the impact player on offense--good numbers but an 88 speed rating may not stretch defenses downfield. The Cornhuskers' defense remains strong with two impact players, LOLB #34, and RE #90, one of the best defensive ends in the game.

#21 - Virginia Tech Hokies

  • '05 Record: 11-2 (Beat Louisville in the Gator Bowl)
  • Conference: ACC (7-1, 1st in Coastal)
  • '05 Offensive Passing Stats: 91st (190.2 yards per game)
  • '05 Offensive Rushing Stats: 29th (190.7 yards per game)
  • Offense Type: Balanced
  • Run/Pass: 58% Run, 42% Pass
  • Offensive Playcall Style: 62% Aggressive, 38% Conservative
  • Offensive Substitutions: 50% More, 50% Less
  • '05 Defensive Passing Stats: 3rd (154.2 yards allowed per game)
  • '05 Defensive Rushing Stats: 8th (93.4 yards allowed per game)
  • Base Defense: 4-3
  • Defend: 56% Run, 44% Pass
  • Defensive Playcall Style: 55% Aggressive, 45% Conservative
  • Defensive Substitutions: 60% Less, 40% More
  • Offensive Playbook: Ace Twin TE, Ace Big Twin WR, Ace Slot Strong, Ace Trips TE, Ace Spread, Ace Flip Trips, I-Form Normal, I-Form Big, Strong I Normal, Strong I Twin TE, Weak I Normal, Weak I Twin WR, Shotgun Split Offset, Shotgun Normal Flex, Shotgun Slot Strg HB Wk, Shotgun Double Flex, Shotgun Trips Strong

Impact Players

PLAYEROVRSPDSTRAWRAGIACCSTAINJJMPCATCARBKTRBKBCVTRKSFAELUSPMJKM
WR #487954484949688888587594440904535958585

PLAYEROVRSPDSTRAWRAGIACCSTAINJJMPTAKCATPRSPRCPMVFMVBSHMCVZCV
LOLB #11968976848792908882885695856591856070

PLAYEROVRSPDSTRAWRAGIACCSTAINJJMPTAKCATPRSPRCPMVFMVBSHMCVZCV
MLB #9938684848688909280916290867590855565

The Virginia Tech Hokies had a strong showing in 2005 but came up short against Florida State in the inaugural ACC championship game. The Hokies begin 2006 on the lower end of the top 25 because of offensive uncertainty (one that ranked 91st in passing, primarily a result of the mobile quarterback style offense employed). Defensively, though, the Hokies remain strong (top 10 in both passing and rushing statistics last year). Two impact linebackers highlight the Hokies' defensive strength.

#22 - Texas Tech Red Raiders

  • '05 Record: 9-3 (Lost to Alabama in the Cotton Bowl)
  • Conference: Big 12 (6-2, t-2nd in South)
  • '05 Offensive Passing Stats: 1st (388.8 yards per game)
  • '05 Offensive Rushing Stats: 104th (107.0 yards per game)
  • Offense Type: Spread Offense
  • Run/Pass: 70% Pass, 30% Run
  • Offensive Playcall Style: 64% Aggressive, 36% Conservative
  • Offensive Substitutions: 55% More, 45% Less
  • '05 Defensive Passing Stats: 15th (180.4 yards allowed per game)
  • '05 Defensive Rushing Stats: 67th (155.4 yards allowed per game)
  • Base Defense: 4-3
  • Defend: 50% Pass, 50% Run
  • Defensive Playcall Style: 70% Aggressive, 30% Conservative
  • Defensive Substitutions: 50% More, 50% Less
  • Offensive Playbook: Ace Big, Ace Big TE Flip, Ace Normal Slot, Ace 4WR, Ace Trips WR, Strong I H Pro, Weak I H Pro, Shotgun Split Twins, Shotgun Split Offset, Shotgun Normal Slot, Shotgun Wing Trips, Shotgun 4WR Spread, Shotgun Spread Flex, Shotgun Double Flex, Shotgun Trips Strong, Shotgun Trey Open

Impact Players

PLAYEROVRSPDSTRAWRAGIACCSTAINJJMPCATCARBKTRBKBCVTRKSFAELUSPMJKM
WR #890876889878990929092626548756560707070

PLAYEROVRSPDSTRAWRAGIACCSTAINJJMPCATCARBKTRBKBCVTRKSFAELUSPMJKM
WR #8892906590889493949492686552806060757075

PLAYEROVRSPDSTRAWRAGIACCSTAINJJMPTAKCATPRSPRCPMVFMVBSHMCVZCV
LOLB #96878276848084848872824885807580803040

The Texas Tech Red Raiders utilize a wide open spread offense (nine Shotgun formations in their offensive playbook). The Red Raiders feature two impact wide receivers, WR #8 and WR #88. Both feature nearly identical ratings. Look to get these receivers in the zone and remain aggressive. Mix in runs from pass-oriented formations to keep defenders honest and out of nickel or dime coverage.

23 - Clemson Tigers

  • '05 Record: 8-4 (Beat Colorado in the Champs Sports Bowl)
  • Conference: ACC (4-4, 3rd in Atlantic)
  • '05 Offensive Passing Stats: 45th (231.6 yards per game)
  • '05 Offensive Rushing Stats: 50th (153.0 yards per game)
  • Offense Type: Spread Offense
  • Run/Pass: 51% Run, 49% Pass
  • Offensive Playcall Style: 67% Aggressive, 33% Conservative
  • Offensive Substitutions: 55% More, 45% Less
  • '05 Defensive Passing Stats: 29th (196.0 yards allowed per game)
  • '05 Defensive Rushing Stats: 25th (120.6 yards allowed per game)
  • Base Defense: 4-3
  • Defend: 51% Run, 49% Pass
  • Defensive Playcall Style: 60% Conservative, 40% Aggressive
  • Defensive Substitutions: 50% More, 50% Less
  • Offensive Playbook: Ace Jumbo Heavy, Ace Big, Ace Big Twin WR, Ace Twin TE, Ace Twin TE WR, Ace Normal Slot, Ace Slot Strong, Ace 4WR, I-Form Twin TE Wing, Strong I H Pro, Shotgun Split Twins, Shotgun 2RB 3WR, Shotgun Ace, Shotgun Normal Slot, Shotgun 4WR Spread, Shotgun Spread Flex

Impact Players

PLAYEROVRSPDSTRAWRAGIACCSTAINJJMPCATCARBKTRBKBCVTRKSFAELUSPMJKM
WR #288904887959496898788655644804035968597

PLAYEROVRSPDSTRAWRAGIACCSTAINJJMPTAKCATPRSPRCPMVFMVBSHMCVZCV
MLB #40928276878286909472925692896555925575

PLAYEROVRSPDSTRAWRAGIACCSTAINJJMPTAKPRSPRCPMVFMVBSHMCVZCV
RE #939984828884889290788585928598852545

The Clemson Tigers feature one impact player on offense, WR #2.

The Clemson Tigers enter 2006 hoping to compete in an ACC that was once dominated by the Florida State Seminoles and now have new (and higher ranked) blood in the Miami Hurricanes and Virginia Tech Hokies. The Tigers are strongest on defense ranking in the top 30 in both passing and rushing statistics in 2005. Defensive lineman RE #93 is ranked 99 overall. Shift your line and mix up packages to get him into the backfield to sack the quarterback or disrupt running plays.

#24 - Alabama Crimson Tide

  • '05 Record: 10-2 (Beat Texas Tech in the Cotton Bowl)
  • Conference: SEC (6-2, 3rd in West)
  • '05 Offensive Passing Stats: 69th (216.4 yards per game)
  • '05 Offensive Rushing Stats: 65th (142.5 yards per game)
  • Offense Type: Balanced
  • Run/Pass: 56% Run, 44% Pass
  • Offensive Playcall Style: 64% Aggressive, 36% Conservative
  • Offensive Substitutions: 55% More, 45% Less
  • '05 Defensive Passing Stats: 5th (160.8 yards allowed per game)
  • '05 Defensive Rushing Stats: 9th (94.3 yards allowed per game)
  • Base Defense: 4-3
  • Defend: 62% Pass, 38% Run
  • Defensive Playcall Style: 50% Aggressive, 50% Conservative
  • Defensive Substitutions: 50% More, 50% Less
  • Offensive Playbook: Ace Big, Ace Normal Slot, Ace Slot Strong, Ace Trips Bunch, I-Form Normal, I-Form Twins, I-Form Big, Split Backs Normal, Split Backs 3WR, Strong I Normal, Strong I Twin TE, Weak I Normal, Weak I Twin WR, Shotgun 2RB 3WR, Shotgun Trips Bunch, Shotgun Spread Flex

Impact Players

PLAYEROVRSPDSTRAWRAGIACCSTAINJJMPCATCARBKTRBKBCVTRKSFAELUSPMJKM
HB #3492907289879294887468909048989091887575

PLAYEROVRSPDSTRAWRAGIACCSTAINJJMPTAKCATPRSPRCPMVFMVBSHMCVZCV
ROLB #42958674888488898978876296857070854565

PLAYEROVRSPDSTRAWRAGIACCSTAINJJMPTAKCATPRSPRCPMVFMVBSHMCVZCV
CB #1919362909393958090656865752030359497

The Alabama Crimson Tide completed a successful season (no SEC title, but a 10-2 record and marked improvement over 6-6 in 2004) with a bowl victory over the high-flying Texas Tech Raiders in the Cotton Bowl. The Crimson Tide begin 2006 with a new signal caller on offense. Establish a strong ground game with impact player HB #34 and count on the Tide's strong defense (two impact players led by ROLB #42) to keep the opposing offense out of the end zone.

#25 - Georgia Tech Yellow Jackets

  • '05 Record: 7-5 (Lost to Utah in the Emerald Bowl)
  • Conference: ACC (5-3, 3rd in Coastal)
  • '05 Offensive Passing Stats: 89th (195.3 yards per game)
  • '05 Offensive Rushing Stats: 49th (153.8 yards per game)
  • Offense Type: Balanced
  • Run/Pass: 53% Run, 47% Pass
  • Offensive Playcall Style: 70% Aggressive, 30% Conservative
  • Offensive Substitutions: 55% More, 45% Less
  • '05 Defensive Passing Stats: 52nd (213.6 yards allowed per game)
  • '05 Defensive Rushing Stats: 13th (103.9 yards allowed per game)
  • Base Defense: 4-3
  • Defend: 62% Pass, 38% Run
  • Defensive Playcall Style: 60% Aggressive, 40% Conservative
  • Defensive Substitutions: 55% Less, 45% More
  • Offensive Playbook: Ace Big, Ace Twin WR, Ace Normal Slot, Ace Slot Strong, Ace Bunch TE, I-Form Normal, I-Form Twin WR, Strong I Normal, Strong I 3WR, Weak I Twin WR, Weak I Big, Shotgun 2RB 3WR, Shotgun Normal Flex, Shotgun Trio, Shotgun Spread Flex, Shotgun Trips

Impact Players

PLAYEROVRSPDSTRAWRAGIACCSTAINJJMPTHPTHACARBKTBCVTRKSFAELUSPMJKM
QB #188825984848494908586826262885765878280

PLAYEROVRSPDSTRAWRAGIACCSTAINJJMPCATCARBKTRBKBCVTRKSFAELUSPMJKM
WR #2198937490939597959797767256976866929493

PLAYEROVRSPDSTRAWRAGIACCSTAINJJMPTAKCATPRSPRCPMVFMVBSHMCVZCV
LOLB #35958774878690929080866282936166878075

A speedy senior at quarterback and quick junior at wide receiver highlight the Georgia Tech Yellowjackets' offense. Both QB #1 and WR #21 are impact players; WR #21 is especially strong with a 98 over all rating and excellent elusiveness and spin and juke move abilities. Mix up your offensive gameplan by utilizing QB #1's speed and ball-carrying abilities.

Chapter 3 - Offensive Playbook

Who doesn't love a 45 to 44 shootout? Well, defensive coaches most likely. But fans love offense. Whether it's a 50 yard bomb to an elite wide receiver or an amazing six-tackles-broken run from a beefy running back, the offensive side of the ball offers plenty of potential excitement.

This section offers tips on executing a dominant offensive gameplan. You'll find tips on the passing game, running game, and option plays as well as details on new NCAA Football 07 features, such as the momentum meter. We'll cover offensive formations, match-ups, and profile some of the best position players in the game.

Offense Fundamentals

New features do change strategies but there are fundamentals that every NCAA Football 07 needs to know before hitting the gridiron. This section provides some general strategies for succeeding in NCAA Football 07 Play Now, Dynasty, and online game modes.

  • Play to your selected team's strengths. Don't choose the Air Force Falcons and expect to pass it around like the Texas Tech Red Raiders. A team's playbook gives the first indication of strengths and weaknesses. An option offense will be geared more toward the run while a spread offense will generally be geared more toward the pass. Check your selected team's personnel statistics. What's the quarterback's statistics? Does he have speed and carrying ability but weak throwing power and accuracy? Then he's likely better suited for a scrambling, mobile style. Then again if the quarterback is slow but excels in throw power and accuracy, he's a better pocket passer.


  • Watch your player fatigue levels. If you just broke a long run with your running back, use packages to sub him out for a play to catch his breath. Get your backup running back in there with some fresh legs. Likewise if you continue to pass to the same receiver over and over again, expect him to suffer some fatigue. Mix it up and toss the football to other receivers to spread it around and keep your players as fresh as possible for the long game. Note that you can always call a timeout and replenish fatigue levels. It might be worth it if you have an impact player in the zone but he's tired.

At the formation selection screen, alter packages to try and exploit mismatches.

  • Utilize motion and packages to gain match-up advantages. For instance, you have scouted the opposing team and know which defenders are the weakest on the squad. Instead of lining up your best receiver against his best cover guy, use motion to spread your best receiver around the field. Or utilize formation packages to shift your best receiver into the slot or outside to move him away from the opposing team's best corner guy. This could be especially important if your opponent has an impact player in the secondary.


  • Consider play selection carefully and become as unpredictable as possible. Don't run out of the Ace formation every single time you call it; don't pass out of the Shotgun formation every single time you call it. Pass out of an expected run formation, such as Ace Big or run out of an expected pass formation, such as Shotgun 4 WR. You can gain match up advantages by doing so. If your opponent calls a stout run defense then calling a pass play will match your stronger receivers against weaker cover guys, such as linebackers.


  • Avoid the defense's impact players. If your opponent has an impact defensive linemen or linebacker then call your run plays toward the opposite side of the field to take that impact player out of the equation. Likewise, in the passing game avoid testing an impact cornerback every single play. You may pay the price with a costly interception. Obviously this tip is even more important if your opponent's impact defender is in the zone.

Gaining Momentum

The primary new gameplay addition to NCAA Football 07 is the momentum meter. The meter looks a bit different between the Xbox 360 and current gen systems but the concept remains the same. To put it simply: you want the momentum! You've seen it before watching any college football game. One team is in control the game. Perhaps they're just running down some clock and protecting their lead. But then all off the sudden, a big time linebacker puts a bone-crushing hit on the running back, jars the ball loose, and scoops it up and returns for a game changing touchdown. That's a momentum shift!

That's essentially how it works in NCAA Football 07. Good plays provide momentum and bad plays remove momentum. With momentum on your side, your players are a bit better, a bit stronger, a bit faster, etc. You can gain momentum by scoring the first touchdown or intercepting a pass on your opponent's first possession. It doesn't matter how it's done but you want to try and keep the momentum for as long as possible--ideally the entire game!

During a game, check your player ratings to see how momentum is affecting your squad. Momentum provides positive boost to player stats (if you don't have the momentum, you're stats won't be penalized). The current generation versions of NCAA Football 07 retain the Home Field Advantage feature, which can negatively affect rattled players (bad play reduces, good play increases).

Scoring the first touchdown of the game is a huge momentum shift.

It's a cool concept that really mirrors real life college football. If you have momentum and the lead but are careless with the ball and toss a costly interception, the other team gains the momentum, which translates into player confidence (in game terms: boost to stats). You may now find the opposing offense a bit harder to stop than last time when you were in control of the momentum meter!

There's no real rhyme or reason on how to manage the momentum meter other than take advantage of it. When you have the momentum, grind it out and don't take chances with the ball. Don't toss the ball into triple coverage just because you think you have a confidence advantage. An interception could shift momentum. If you lack momentum, you may have to take more chances because safe plays may not work against a momentum-juiced defense. Or you could choose to try and build that momentum through successful, high-percentage plays like screen passes.

Scoring a touchdown first has a big impact on momentum--usually the opening scorer receives a full momentum bar. That's a big advantage in the early game and could create an uphill battle for the opposing offense. To get it back, the trailing team may need to grind it out and get some first downs to reduce the opposing team's momentum bar.

Play to your team's strengths and focus on your impact players!

Impact Players

The impact players feature that debuted in '06 makes a return in NCAA Football 07. In short: each team features three "impact players," basically the team's most important players. It could be the quarterback, a running back, a defensive linemen, or even the kicker (teams have one on defense, one on offense, one on either). On the Xbox 360 version, spot the impact player by looking for the white star beneath his feet. With that star is spinning, the impact player is in the zone and can be even more of an impact!

Check the Top 25 Profiles section of this game guide to find the impact players' on the nation's best teams. Note that these are the default impact players. If you play in a dynasty mode, impact players can actually change during the course of the season. Perhaps your favorite team's running back isn't an impact player. However, he's having a Heisman caliber season. You may discover that he's been anointed an impact player. The team will only still have three total, however; one of your other impact players had to "give up his spot" in order to change the running back's status.

It should go without saying that it's important to take advantage of your team's best players. It's especially true with impact players. Certainly you could use them as a decoy against an overly aggressive opponent looking to shut down your star receiver. However, the best players in the game wouldn't be the best players in the game if they didn't make game changing plays.

Call plays to get your impact players in the game early and often. If the defense is trying to shut down an impact receiver, then move him around with motion and packages to try and break him open to haul in a few catches. If the defense is crowding the line to shut down your impact running back, call some play action passes or screen plays where you can still get the running back the ball in a short passing game. Conversely, beware of the defense's impact players! Exploit weaker corners or linebackers by throwing or running away from the defense's strength.

Offensive Formations

The Xbox 360 version streamlines offensive play calling. You can bypass formations altogether and instead focus on particular players or play types. For instance you may want to get your impact receiver the ball, so instead of calling the play by formation, call the play through the player. Even with these tweaks to play calling, it's important to know the strengths, weaknesses, and importance of each offensive formation. The following reveals offensive formations and how to utilize them.

  • Ace: The term "ace" refers to the single running back behind the quarterback. Ace is a very flexible formation and available in a bunch of varieties. Ace can be run-focused with double tight end sets or pass-focused with three wide receivers. The lack of a fullback does decrease blocking but impact running backs can still thrive.


  • I-Form: Running back and fullback lined up in an "I" formation behind the quarterback. Strong running formation, though there are more pass-oriented variations. Pass catching fullbacks can thrive in passes to the flat.


  • Strong and Weak: These formations are similar to the I-Form but the fullback is offset to either the strong or weak side. The strong side is the same side as the tight end. Also provides a strong short passing game with backs out of the backfield. Force your opponent to think short while you mix it up and go long to a receiver or tight end.


  • Split Backs: Also called the "Pro Form" formation. The backs are split behind the quarterback, essentially perpendicular to the quarterback or parallel to the line. It's an intriguing formation for teams with two good running backs (use packages to use dual HB) or good pass catching backs.


  • Shotgun: The quarterback lines up several yards behind the center taking the snap away from the line of scrimmage. This typically affords the passer more time to find the receivers. A typical passing formation but can be a disguised run formation. Shotgun offers many variations and alignments. Mix it up and move an impact receiver around the formations to open up new routes and mismatch possibilities.


  • Pistol: Check Nevada's playbook for the Pistol formation. It's Shotgun but a running back lines up behind the quarterback adding to run potential.


  • Flexbone, Full House, Wishbone, Jumbo T: These are typical option formations with three backs lined up in a variety of formations behind or adjacent to the quarterback. Flexbone is closer to the line and Wishbone (so named because the formation looks like an upside-down wishbone) is away from the line. Obviously ideal for option plays, runs, and short passes.


  • Goal Line: Tight formation intended to gain short yardage. Typically subs wide receivers for tight ends for better run blocking at the line. This formation can be a tricky pass formation if you can withstand the pass rush.


  • Hail Mary: Desperate passing situation! You have no other choice but to get the ball downfield! There actually may be better options in Shotgun formation but the Hail Marry formation is here if you need it.

Offensive Packages

You can customize formations by using offensive packages. This makes adjustments to the formation's default personnel. For instance you may wish to switch out the running back for a fullback or move the primary receiver into the slot. On the Xbox 360, when selecting a formation, press the left trigger to cycle through packages. The following reveals some of the most frequent offensive packages and when to use them.

  • Strong Slot: Shifts the primary receiver into the slot. Excellent for exposing a mismatch against a weaker nickel defense cornerback. Ideal for impact receivers to move them around the field to open up new routes.


  • WR (or Flanker or TE) Flip: Flips the primary and secondary receiver, which could put the primary receiver against a weaker corner.


  • Twin HB: In two RB sets, swaps in the backup running back instead of the fullback. Excellent for teams with at least two strong running backs. Also great for check down passes in the flat to either back.


  • Jumbo (or Fullback): Swaps in fullbacks to the halfback position.


  • TE Slot: Shifts the tight end into the slot receiver position. Excellent for team's with impact tight ends as it opens up new pass patterns.


  • HB Sub (Spell HB) or WR Sub: Give your running back a breather and sub in the backup for a few plays. Or your wide receiver in one receiver sets.


  • HB Slot (or Flanker or Split End or Wideout): Shifts the running back into the receiver position. Awesome for team's with impact running backs with high catch ability.


  • 3 WR or 4 WR: Removes a tight end in a two or three receiver set and replaces with a third or fourth wide receiver.


  • CB Slot (or Flanker): Insert a fast cornerback into the WR position! He may not be the best at catching the ball but it's sure to keep your opponent off guard.


  • WR Wing: Inserts the primary receiver into a goal line formation instead of one of the tight ends. TE Wing is the opposite.


  • HB/FB Flip: Flip these positions, perhaps in an option offensive set. Effective for teams with a strong fullback.


  • Backup QB: Get the backup in there in case your QB is fatigued or you just want to mix it up.


  • TE/HB Flanker Left/Right: Shifts TE left or right or HB to the flanker position left or right.


  • FB/TE Swap: Swap the fullback and tight end positions.


  • TE Backfield: Move a tight end into the backfield. Good for strong blocking tight ends or to mix up pass routes for excellent pass catching tight ends.

Pre-snap Reads and Adjustments

Before snapping the ball, compare defensive alignment to your current play call and adjust as necessary.

You've selected your formation and offensive package and are approaching the line of scrimmage. It's time to execute to the play. However, there are still reads and adjustments to make that could determine the play's success or failure. By making the correct read or adjustment you could turn a minimal gain into a momentum-shifting touchdown.

The first thing to look for is how the defense is lining up against your play call. Let's say you called a run play up middle, such as HB Dive. However the defense has pinched the line and linebackers--this stacks the interior of the line. Your play's chance of success has diminished greatly. That doesn't mean it can't be successful but you have to play the odds. In general it will fail more than it will succeed.

Likewise, perhaps you called an outside run like a pitch play but the defense is in a 4-4 with spread line and linebackers to cover the outside run and give little concern to the inside play. In these situations you may need to adjust your play call through audibles, hot routes, motion, and flipped plays.

Hot routes can also be used to adjust blocking. In a run play, use a hot route on a WR to force him to crash in toward the line to assist in blocking. In an outside run, the WR may be able to slow up a defensive end or linebacker long enough for you to get your running back outside for a big gain.

Utilize motion to move a receiver to the other side of the field or to send a running back out of the backfield and toward the line of scrimmage. You can use motion to create match-up problems against zone defenses (in man-to-man coverage, expect to see the defender follow your receiver). To use motion, hit "B" to select the player then press a direction to send that player in motion. Here's a tip: you could hit "B" to cycle through all options but it takes time, especially if you overshoot a guy. Instead, hold "B" down and move the stick toward the player you want to select.

You'll use "B" to select a player for a hot route. Use hot routes to adjust a wide receiver (or running back) pass route. Perhaps your fastest receiver is running an out route toward the sideline. But when you reach the line of scrimmage, you see that your fastest receiver will be in single coverage. You may want to test that cornerback deep. Use the hot route to alter the receiver's route from an out to a go (a straight route toward the end zone). You can use hot routes to provide outlet or dump off receivers. For instance, use a hot route to send your running back out into the flat in case the deeper receivers are covered.

Change the play entirely with an audible. You may have called a running play in the huddle but you can always switch to a passing play if the defense has stacked the line. Expect defenses to call an audible as well. The game could change very quickly if the defense stays in run prevent and you have just called an audible to a long pass!

Flipping a run play could also pay off big. Perhaps the defense has shifted players left or right to protect the outside run to that side. You could flip your outside run to the weaker side of the defense.

Attacking through the Air

Becoming a good passer is much more than just hitting the correct button. Elements such as team selection, play calling, pre-snap adjustments, reading coverage, and quarterback movement can affect the success or failure of the pass play. And don't forget momentum or impact players! It's about combining all of these into a consistent routine that mixes small and large gains to control the game.

Check your favorite team's player statistics so you know who the fast receivers are. Now you'll know who can test your opponent's defense with the deep ball! Slower receivers, in general, would be more suited for hook or comeback routes. You should get to know your quarterback as well. Does he have the speed to be a scrambling QB or should he stick in the pocket?

Mix up your passing game by passing out of expected run formations, like a multiple tight end set.

As mentioned previously in the offensive section of this guide, an effective offense begins at play calling. Not necessarily which play, since any can work effectively, but it's about being unpredictable. Certainly when it's 3rd and long, there isn't much choice if you want to get a first down. Percentages say you are unlikely to run for a first down in that situation. However, on first down, there's not a rulebook that says you must run the ball! Open up the offense with a pass on first down. Or perhaps it's second and short--the perfect time for a pass!

Consider the same concepts when choosing your formations. You want to take advantage of match-ups so it's important to keep your opponent off guard with your formation calls. If you are consistently calling pass plays out of 3 and 4 WR sets but always calling runs out of 1 and 2 WR sets then your opponent can call defensive formations with confidence and you will never really have a match-up advantage.

But if you start passing out of 1 and 2 WR sets, you may find your opponent so concentrated on stopping your run that you have single coverage against your best receivers. Depending on your team selection, you may choose to pass out of double or triple tight end sets. Force your opponent to guess wildly with each and every defensive decision.

Passing plays with a "PA" at the beginning of the name are play-action passes. The quarterback executes an action like it's a run play but it's in fact a passing play. The action can fool defenders and leave receivers wide open for a big gain. Be wary of calling play-action passes against a heavy blitzing team. The animation can be slow and provides a lot of time for defenders to reach your quarterback. Be prepared to throw quickly or call "PA" plays with quick options.

Read the defense before snapping the ball and call a hot route or audible as necessary to maximize success of the play.

After making any pre-snap adjustments (described earlier in this section), your next job is to read the defensive coverage. It's challenging work in a short amount of time. You need to quickly determine who is blitzing and who is not. Is it zone coverage or man-to-man coverage? Where are the holes in the zone? Or do you have a guy beat in man-to-man coverage for a long gain? If everyone is covered, do you have an outlet receiver to get rid of the ball? What about pass rush: are you in immediate danger or do you have time for your receivers to break open their routes? Do you need to scramble and possibly toss the ball away?

That's a lot to think about and it's those elements that make football games so fun! At the snap of the ball, take note of how certain defensive players move. For instance, watch the linebackers. If they rush toward the line of scrimmage, they're in a blitz. If they go directly toward a specific receiver, they're in man-to-man coverage. If the linebacker backpedals or moves toward the sidelines, they're in zone coverage.

If the linebackers protect the sidelines in a zone, avoid out patterns. If the linebackers backpedal in a zone, out and crossing routes should be effective. If the linebackers blitz, look for the slant route. You should also watch the safeties. If the safeties backpedal, they're protecting the deep zone, which could leave a hole for a receiver down either sideline or in a gap near the field's center (depending on the placement of the middle linebacker). Watch how defenders react at the snap and you will be able to detect where your receivers can break open.

Watch the passing lanes; this is the space between your quarterback and the intended receiver. Defenders are rather adept at leaping up and batting balls above their head--and that's a positive result because it usually results in an interception! Toss the ball into clear passing lanes to avoid an untimely momentum shift. Or be sure to avoid bullet passes and put some air under the ball to send it over the defenders.

Passes to receivers in single coverage (or, of course, wide open) have the best chance for success. Avoid tossing to receivers in double or triple coverage. Chances are a lot slimmer that you'll come down with the catch and, more importantly, chances are a lot higher that the result of the play could be an interception and a disastrous momentum shift.

Knowing when to fire a bullet pass or a touch lob can be the difference between a catch and an interception.

Choose pass plays that offer multiple options. You may have a receiver on a crossing route, another on an out route, another on a go pattern, and finally an outlet receiver or running back in case all downfield options are covered. Use the sprint button to scramble out of the pocket if you're under pressure. Take note that your quarterback is much more accurate standing still than on the run.

NCAA Football 07 includes precision passing for greater pass control. Touch the left thumb stick in the direction you want to lead the receiver. Touch the right thumb stick to discover the QB vision cone, which was included in last year's Madden. It's optional, though, but if you want to use it you can move the cone around with the right thumb stick as well as hold right trigger and press a receiver button to focus on that particular teammate. In Madden, the cone increased accuracy.

How hard you press the corresponding receiver button will also have an effect on a pass play's success or failure. Holding the button down fires a bullet pass, best used in hitch, comeback, or slant routes. Essentially if the ball needs to get there quickly (perhaps your receiver is entering a defender's zone), then fire a bullet pass. Tap the button (from soft to medium) for a lob pass of varying degrees. Using this type of pass allows time for your receiver to run under the ball and move away from pursuing defenders--ideal for out and go routes.

If you're under pressure constantly from the opposing team's pass rush, consider more pass blockers, such as formations with additional tight ends. However, you can also retain your wide receiver sets and just utilize the running back as an additional blocker. Select the RB, call a hot route, and use the triggers for the RB to block left or right.

Top Ten Rated Quarterbacks

Here are NCAA Football 07's top ten quarterbacks sorted by overall rating. The chart also lists important quarterback stats: speed, awareness, throw power, and throw accuracy.

TEAMPLAYERIMPACTOVRSPDAWRTHPTHA
Notre Dame#10Yes9762959495
Ohio State#10Yes9586859088
Michigan State#5Yes9576869490
Florida#12Yes9470889093
Iowa#5Yes9365909390
Louisville#12Yes9262859593
Arizona State#9Yes9262869590
West Virginia#5Yes9185768987
Nevada#3Yes9165888992
Houston#4Yes9172859287

Top Ten Rated Wide Receivers

The following chart reveals the best wide receivers in NCAA Football 07. The players' are sorted by overall rating but include speed, awareness, catching, and jumping statistics.

TEAMPLAYERIMPACTOVRSPDAGIACCAWRCTHJMPBKTELUBCVSFASPMJKM
Georgia Tech#21Yes98939395909797729297669493
USC#8Yes96949295889698599290558085
Notre Dame#83Yes96909092939695688892758085
Washington State#83Yes94929293939393599195618889
USC#2Yes93959496909290569389508592
South Carolina#4Yes93929294849497629190608090
Ohio State#7Yes93999999879092489996359798
Texas Tech#88Yes92908894909294657580607075
Oregon#18Yes91908992889288658080607080
Michigan#15Yes91959697888888599897359095

Top Ten Rated Tight Ends

Don't forget about the tight end! He can play a vital role in an effective passing game. The following chart lists the best tight ends in NCAA Football 07 sorted by overall rating.

TEAMPLAYERIMPACTOVRSPDAWRCTHJMPBKTTRKPBKRBK
Minnesota#89Yes957882827665705965
Arizona State#86Yes958482888468604856
Rutgers#81Yes948087887665755256
Oregon State#89Yes937687827465775965
Michigan#89No937485787062756268
Miami#82Yes938476858268705659
Missouri#82Yes928478858568705256
BYU#89No928485878756695256
Boise State#91Yes928286848062655659
Oregon#44No917280725965706872

Take a moment to check your favorite running back's statistics. Will he excel inside or does he have the speed for outside runs?

Grinding on the Ground

There's something satisfying about trucking over defenders in route to a huge ground gain. A well-established rushing attack is an effective gameplan in NCAA Football 07. Like the passing game, there are certain fundamentals to follow to gain consistent yardage. However, a lot of yardage can be gained through effective maneuvers, such as the array of special moves like spins, jukes, and stiff arms.

Know your selected running back's strengths. Is he a fast, speedy back with elusiveness or is he a strong back with trucking power. Faster backs can excel in outside runs because they can outrun defensive ends and outside linebackers to reach the outside. Turning the corner at the sidelines can lead to huge gains. More powerful running backs are better suited for the inside run where they can pancake defenders and break tackles with power moves. They lack the speed to get outside but have the strength to bust through linebackers and reach weaker secondary defenders.

Fatigue levels are important for any position but expect to find your running back fatigued the most--that is if you're featuring the ground game. Use packages to sub in another halfback to take over for a few plays, especially after a big run or a lot of special moves. A fatigued player is more susceptible to fumbling or, even worse, injury.

Follow your blockers! See how the play is designed in the playbook and execute.

A big part of a running back's success is his blocking. Check your team's offensive line and know which side is the strongest in terms of run blocking. Does your team have a good fullback? If so, consider using I-Form, Strong, or Weak formations that feature a fullback who can provide additional blocking. Use motion pre-snap to provide additional blocking in the run direction. For instance, move a WR to the run side of the ball. Call a hot route on the WR and adjust his blocking scheme.

Look at each running play in the playbook. It has a specific design. The running back is shown running in a particular direction and the line blocks in a particular fashion. Perhaps some linemen pull outside or open a hole in the middle. Follow the play's design and allow your blockers to open holes and push defenders out of the way. Avoid using the sprint button until you've broken through the line. Using the sprint button seems to aid defenders (they have their own burst). Also the sprint button seems to minimize the effectiveness of special moves. Pulling a juke, spin, or stiff arm through the line can be more effective before the sprint; once you're past the initial defenders, start your sprint.

Don't hesitate to audible at the line of scrimmage if your called run play doesn't look like it will succeed. Perhaps the defense is overloading the right side of the line--exactly where you plan to run. You could use an audible to switch to a pass play or simply flip the run play so it attacks the opposite side of the line.

You'll find additional player ratings on the Xbox 360, including specific ratings for special moves like the juke and spin. You'll want to utilize these moves when in the open field. Time a stiff arm when you collide with a defender. Note that the stiff arm button also moves the football to the opposite arm--a wise idea when you're near the sidelines so if you do fumble, it has a higher chance of going out of bounds. Perform a juke or spin move when you're approaching a defender to avoid the tackle. Note that the juke move can be performed with the right thumb stick to the left or right. Don't forget to use the cover ball button to protect the football!

Also, pressing the right thumb stick up is the "truck stick". Basically the opposite of the hit stick! Use the truck stick to level a defender and run him over (it's in the statistics as trucking). Be wary or abusing special moves when you're surrounded by defenders. You have a higher chance of fumbling when you're performing special moves. Use the shoulder button to protect the ball to avoid a costly, momentum-shifting fumble.

Top Ten Rated Running Backs

The following table reveals the best 10 running backs in NCAA Football 07. It's sorted by overall rating but also includes other important statistics, such as speed, agility, acceleration, carrying ability, break tackle, and new 360 ratings such a trucking, spin move, juke move, and stiff arm.

TEAMPLAYERIMPACTOVRSPDAGIACCAWRCTHCARBKTTRKELUBCVSFASPMJKM
Oklahoma#28Yes9893929687629798989097978585
Cal#10Yes9592899284659296968793957080
Northern Illinois#1Yes9494969690688885869797879698
Louisville#19Yes9489909387749093958588928085
Auburn#23Yes9493929592688787909271929091
West Virginia#10Yes9294939678688987899597889497
Notre Dame#3No9293929484788685879395848580
Michigan#20Yes9290919384769187859097607580
Arkansas#5Yes9294959678658888919492879896
Alabama#34Yes9290879290689090908898917575

Top Ten Rated Fullbacks

A great running back is usually only as good as his blocking and fullbacks open a lot of those holes. And many are pretty good runners themselves! This table lists the top rated fullbacks in NCAA Football 07 sorted by overall rating. Other vital statistics are also listed, such as break tackle, trucking, and run blocking.

TEAMPLAYERIMPACTOVRSPDAGIACCAWRCTHCARBKTTRKRBK
Georgia Tech#40No95727274806568656772
Arkansas#22No95868288727685849052
Rutgers#23Yes94878588877490889244
Nebraska#41No94767278786862688568
West Virginia#35No93847884706574859162
Navy#22Yes93857885726285889259
Florida Atlantic#35Yes92807680767476787756
Virginia Tech#37No92726870885665657072
Northwestern#44No92686570806572788568
Hawaii#45No92625962706262727478

The Option

The option play is so named because you have options! In its basic form, the option play consists of the quarterback scrambling out of the pocket and choosing to run up field or pitch it to a nearby running back. In more complex forms, the quarterback could also hand off to the fullback before scrambling outside or even remain behind the line of scrimmage and toss a pass (hit "A" to open the pass windows on an option play on the 360).

The quarterback's option choice depends on the defenders' reactions. If defenders crash toward the quarterback, pitch it to the running back. If the defenders guard the running back, turn up field with the quarterback. On an option pass play, if the defenders leave receivers open, go for the pass instead of the run.

When the defender commits to the quarterback, it's time to pitch on the option play.

Several teams focus their offense primarily on the option. For instance, check out Air Force. Their playbook is dominated by the Full House, Flexbone, and Wishbone formations: all of these are primarily option formations. But the option isn't left for the smaller schools. Teams like Ohio State and West Virginia with their extremely fast quarterbacks (86 and 85 respectively) can run lethal option plays. The biggest danger is your quarterback's health. A lot of the time you'll be turning up field with the quarterback and taking some bone-crushing hits. Hit the dive button to slide and avoid getting crushed.

When executing the option, watch outside defenders. Does the defensive end and outside linebackers move inside or outside? These defenders will likely be the first "line of defense" for your running back or quarterback. If they move outside, you can turn inside with the quarterback. If they're inside, then pitch to the running back. Utilize WR motions and hot route blocking for additional help to clear the outside running lanes. The option can certainly bust open long gains but it's equally important to advance with consistent yardage with good decision making.

Chapter 5 - Defensive Playbook

Prevent your opponent from scoring and it becomes much easier to win games. A strong defense can win games all on its own. Keeping your opponent in an endless cycle of "three and out" is as satisfying as breaking a long run on offense. And putting a huge lick on a quarterback or nabbing a key interception can quickly shift momentum.

This section provides tips on executing a strong defense. We'll cover defensive playbooks, formations, packages, how to adjust your defense before the snap, and how to execute your defense after the snap.

Defensive Formations

Each team features a specific defensive playbook; each playbook in turn features a different collection of formations. The list below reveals each playbook and included formations.

  • 4-3: 4-3 Normal, 4-3 Over, 4-3 Under, 46 Bear, 4-4 Split, 5-2 Normal, Nickel Normal, Nickel Strong, Nickel 3-3-5, Dime Normal, Dime 3-2-6, Quarter 3 Deep, Goal Line


  • 3-3-5: 3-3-5 Stack, 3-3-5 Cougar, 3-3-5 Split, 3-3-5 Bear, 3-4 Under, 5-2 Normal, Nickel Normal, Nickel 3-3-5, Nickel 2-4-5, Dime Normal, Dime 3-2-6, Quarter 3 Deep, Goal Line


  • 4-2-5: 4-2-5 Normal, 4-2-5 Over, 4-2-5 Under, 4-2-5 Bear, 4-4 Split, 5-2 Normal, Nickel Normal, Nickel 3-3-5, Nickel Strong, Dime Normal, Dime 3-2-6, Quarter 3 Deep, Goal Line


  • 3-4: 3-4 Normal, 3-4 Over, 3-4 Under, 3-4 Solid, 4-4 Split, 5-2 Normal, Nickel Normal, Nickel 3-3-5, Nickel 2-4-5, Dime Normal, Dime 3-2-6, Quarter 3 Deep, Goal Line


  • Multiple D: 4-3 Normal, 4-3 Over, 46 Bear, 3-4 Under, 3-4 Solid, 5-2 Normal, Nickel Normal, Nickel 3-3-5, Nickel 1-5-5, Dime Normal, Dime 3-2-6, Quarter 3 Deep, Goal Line

Each defensive formation has its advantages and disadvantages. Some are better geared to stop the run, while others are better suited to shut down the passing game. Using each formation effectively will dramatically improve your defensive game. The following chart reveals all defensive alignments in NCAA Football 07 and provides advantages and disadvantages for each. The types column refers to the different subsets of each formation. This generally refers to the placement of certain defenders. For instance, "under" and "over" refer to the placement (either left or right) of linebackers.

FORMATIONTYPESDESCRIPTIONADVANTAGESDISADVANTAGES
Goal LineN/AShort yardage formation. A package can keep an impact safety on the field.Tightly packed to counter short yardage and goal line situations. Shift the line and linebackers to plug expected run direction.Watch the play action! Easily burned by a long pass. Even a quick pass if the defense isn't in alignment. Be prepared to audible out of goal line.
5-2NormalFive defensive linemen, two linebackers, four defensive backs. Use packages to swap in an impact linebacker if he's off the field.Strong for teams with defensive line depth. Run stopping defense at the line, especially inside runs.Weaker against outside runs unless the defensive ends are especially strong. Runs that penetrate the line can be big gains cause of lack of linebackers. Not a strong pass defense.
4-3Normal, Over, UnderFour defensive linemen, three linebackers, four defensive backs.Standard base defense. Best if you have a strong line over linebackers and fast ends. Covers inside run well and short to medium passes.Beware of the 3+ receiver sets. Outside and option run can be difficult without proper linebacker alignment.
3-4Normal, Over, Under, SolidThree defensive linemen, four linebackers, four defensive backs.Four linebackers offer a variety of blitz packages. Best if you have strong linebackers over line. Good mobility along the line for outside runs and options. Decent against medium pass as linebackers can cover lanes in zone.Beware of pass-heavy offensive sets. You don't want linebackers covering wide receivers! Somewhat susceptible to inside run depending on what your linebackers are doing and their abilities.
4-4SplitFour defensive linemen, four linebackers, three defensive backs. Use packages to swap in an impact safety if he's off the field.Additional linebackers can protect outside run. Many blitzing options. Strong against runs and short passes.Only three defensive backs will put a lot of pressure on your corners and safeties. Beware of trip WR sets or greater or play a safer zone defense.
46BearSix at the line, two at the linebacker position, three in coverage.Puts pressure on the quarterback and can defense runs at the line. Lots of blitz opportunities and coverage disguises.Vulnerable to quick passes with so many at the line. Avoid using against pass-heavy formations unless you have the pass rushing skills to get at the quarterback.
4-2-5Normal, Over, Under, BearFour defensive linemen, two linebackers, five defensive backs. Use packages to swap in an impact linebacker if he's off the field.Nickel secondary to cover pass plays (three WR sets) and a good defensive line could still get pressure on the QB. Linebackers can blitz or be in their zone.Can be weak against a run that gets through the line--only a couple linebackers between the ball carrier and secondary. Stay in zone if you think opponent may run.
3-3-5Stack, Cougar, Split, BearThree defensive linemen, three linebackers, five defensive backs.Five defensive backs to cover the pass with three linebackers available to cover run or provide additional pressure on quarterback.Unless you use some LBs or DBs blitzing, the three man line may not get much pressure on quarterback. Can be vulnerable to inside runs with the lack of line defense.
NickelNormal, Strong, 3-3-5, 2-4-5, 1-5-5Five defensive backs. Use packages to swap in an impact linebacker if he's off the field.Added defensive back to protect against the pass. Use against 3 WR sets. Other nickel formations add additional linebackers if your group is particularly skilled or deep.More vulnerable to run plays. Defensive backs are generally worse tacklers.
DimeNormal, 3-2-6Six defensive backs. Use packages to swap in an impact linebacker if he's off the field. The 3-2-6 removes a defensive linemen and adds a second linebacker.Strongest against the certain passing situations. Six defensive backs can cover a lot of area, particularly in zone. Use against four and more WR sets.Watch for the run audibles at the line and beware of quarterback scrambles, especially if your defensive backs are in man coverage and moving away from line of scrimmage.
Quarter3 DeepSeven defensive backs.When you're certain your opponent is going to pass! Combine with pass commit at the snap.With so many defensive backs, you are vulnerable to an unexpected run play. But often you will be in long yardage situations anyhow.

Momentum and Impact Defenders

Momentum factors in defensive situations as well. You can turn the tide of momentum with a key interception, fumble recovery, or help it along with a crushing quarterback sack. Return an interception or fumble for a touchdown and the momentum will likely shift completely. Similar to the offensive side of the ball, if you have momentum in your favor, strive to keep it while on defense. Avoid giving up the big play or any points. You don't need to take huge chances; then again, since momentum is on your side, your players are performing with the utmost confidence.

If you are on the wrong side of the momentum meter, you may need to take more chances on defense. Call an extra blitz or two to try and sack the quarterback or force a turnover. Utilize the hit stick on defense to try and jar the ball loose from a careless ball carrier.

Keep impact defenders on the field on all formations using packages.

Impact players play a big role on defense again this year. As stated before in this guide, each team features three impact players; at least one of those will be on the defensive side of the ball. Depending on where your impact player lines up, use packages to keep him on the field no matter which defensive formation you choose. An outside linebacker might sit in certain formations; use packages to keep him on the field, especially if he's in the zone.

Defensive Packages

Use packages when selecting a defensive formation to switch or flip player positions. It's especially useful to ensure an impact defender (especially a defender in the zone!) is on the field during a particular formation (for instance, perhaps your LOLB is an impact player and isn't on the field during a Dime formation). The list below reveals some packages and their uses.

  • LB, CB, or Safety Flip: Flips the outside linebackers, corners, or safeties. If an opponent is running or passing heavily to one side to avoid your impact player, flip them!


  • DT and DE Flip: Same as above, just the defensive linemen.


  • MLB or OLB Flip: In four linebacker sets, this flips the outside or middle linebackers.


  • LOLB Left or Right: In Nickel defense, subs in your LOLB. Important if that's an impact player you'd rather have in the current formation.


  • ROLB/LOLB: Inserts this player into the Dime formation. Useful if that's your impact player.


  • LB Pass Rush: Positions a LB on the line to rush the quarterback.


  • SS (in 4-4): Inserts strong safety instead of the free safety.


  • FS (in Goal Line): Inserts free safety instead of strong safety.


  • LB Ends: Positions linebackers at the end of the line.


  • 46 Swap: Swaps position of the linebackers in the 46 defense.


  • 4th CB: Switches in a fourth corner into Dime. Good for teams with depth at the position.

Defensive Pre-Snap Adjustments

There are some new features to the pre-snap (and at the snap) adjustments on the defensive side of the ball for NCAA Football 07. It's very similar to when you're on offense. The quarterback surveys the defense to see if the current playcall will work or if it needs adjusting. The defenders also must gauge the offensive formation and make adjustments before the snap to better ensure an effective defense of the called play.

Adjust the position of the linebackers to protect against directional runs or to try and free up a blitzing defender.

Both the defensive line and linebackers can shift laterally, tighten up, and spread out. Before the snap, press the shoulder buttons to activate the Line Shift or LB Shift. Use the left thumb stick or the directional pad to shift the line or LB left, right, down (tighten up), or up (spread out). Shift the line or linebackers left or right to guard against an expected outside run in the same direction (obviously susceptible to a run in the other direction). Pinch the line or linebackers in to guard against the inside run or spread them out to protect against the outside run. But pinching inside can open up the outside run and spreading out can open up the inside run.

When adjusting the line or linebackers, using the left thumb stick or the directional pad retains the defensive line or linebackers defensive assignments but simply alters their location. If you use the right thumb stick, it alters the defensive line or linebackers' assignment.

Change the defensive line or linebackers' assignments using the right thumb stick after activating Line Shift or LB Shift with the shoulder buttons. You can assign the defensive line to crash left or crash right. The line will push left or right which can disrupt those running lanes. Assign the defensive line to crash in to pinch the inside run and rush out to help protect against the outside run or the option play.

Press the LB Shift shoulder button to change linebacker assignments. You can make the LOLB or ROLB blitz by moving the right thumb stick in the left or right direction respectively. Pressing the right thumb stick down changes all linebacker assignments to a blitz; pressing the right thumb stick up changes all linebacker assignments to zone coverage.

You may want to alter linebacker assignments when you notice the offense has weak protection on a particular side and the blitzing linebacker may be able to get into the backfield for the sack. Or you may expect a run in that direction and the linebacker would essentially be in a "run blitz" trying to plug the gap of the expected run play. You may need to call off the blitz and retreat to zone coverage if you suspect a crossing route or quick slant pass play--blitzing linebackers would leave the area open.

You can adjust secondary coverage pre-snap. Shift corners and safeties into press coverage to jam receivers at the line; effective against slower receivers and could shut down quick routes. However, press coverage could get burned by speedy receivers on deeper routes. Alternatively you could shift the secondary coverage back to protect against the deep ball (useful in any long yardage situations). Of course this leaves the shorter passes open.

Audible into press coverage to jam receivers at the line.

Set up your defensive audibles to counter any expected pass or run situations. Use run stopping and pass stopping defenses in case you need to counter an offensive audible. Be prepared for any situation. The offense (a human player for certain) may get tricky if you're in Dime coverage. You can also flip defensive formation with an audible; in case you want to change flip blitzing defenders or coverage assignments.

Additional coverage audibles include showing a blitz and aligning to the offensive formation. Showing blitz can force the offense out of their current play or cause the quarterback to hurry a throw. It also keeps the coverage close to the line in case there's a run play but could also open the deeper play if the offense doesn't by the fake. Use the align audible to position your coverage against the offensive formations receivers (including tight ends) to better cover against quicker routes. Also, when you're in zone defense, your defenders don't automatically align with the offensive personnel. Quickly use the align audible to move into position so you don't tip off that you're in zone coverage.

Executing your Defense

NCAA Football 07 offers a few new options at the snap of the ball. You can try to "jump the snap" (Y button on the 360) to get defensive linemen and blitzing defenders an edge against their offensive counterparts. Hit the button too soon (before the snap), though, and your defender will jump offside.

Time it correctly and you'll see a "Great Jump" appear at the bottom of the screen. The CPU, especially on Heisman difficulty, is pretty adept at jumping the snap. Jumping the snap successfully can punish an offensive line. Your defenders will be in the backfield sooner and be in better position for a quarterback sack or a tackle for a loss.

Another feature is run and pass commit. At the snap of the ball, move the right thumb stick down to commit to the run or right stick up to commit to the pass. This move is often a high risk reward option. If you call it correctly, you could get the running back behind the backfield or pick off a pass. But if you get it wrong, you could give up a huge run or pass play (more often the pass). Committing to the pass can be very effective on 3rd down and long situations (5 to 6 yards or more). Be very careful committing to the run. Your defenders really pull up and deep receivers gain several steps--making it very easy to connect on a big pass play.

Note the offensive personnel before selecting your defensive formation. You don't want to be caught in Goal Line when the offense sends out five receivers!

Choosing which defender to control can play a big role in a successful defensive series. Make sure you know the defender's assignment. If he's in man coverage and you decide to blitz, you're going to leave a receiver wide open. You need to follow the player's assignment to maintain your defensive call. There's no rhyme or reason to which player you select. You could be a lineman, a backer, or a secondary defender. You could play as the impact defender or allow the CPU to control him. Pay attention to the assignment!

Consider the following tips when selecting and executing your defensive plays:

  • Always check the offensive formation package before selecting defense. You don't want to select 46 when the offense is sending out 5 WRs. Although the offense could be unpredictable you have to play the odds and line up your best chance to stop the current play call. Become unpredictable through blitzes.


  • Pressure, pressure, pressure! If a computer or human opponent has all day to hit receivers, then they're going to hit receivers! Mix up your blitz packages to keep your opponent's quarterback off guard. Forcing the quarterback to hurry throws is good strategy because it could lead to overthrown receivers or an interception. If you're faced against an opponent who likes to roll out a lot (expect this tactic online), then use corner or nickel back blitzes as well as containment defenses (LB Contain, DE Contain).


  • Apply pressure in man coverage defenses because the longer the quarterback has to throw, the more likely the receivers can finally get open. In zone coverage, you can afford to sit back a bit, especially with a team with a stronger defensive line that can put pressure without extra blitzing defenders.


  • Defenders on the 360 version feature more unique statistics. Make sure you check your favorite team's defenders and examine their abilities in zone and man coverage. Block shedding is also important, especially for linemen and linebackers.


  • If you're trying to swat the ball as a defender, hold down the swat ball button. You don't press it at the time of the swat; instead, you hold it down and the player will automatically swat when the time is right. For instance, when the pass is in the air, switch to the closest defender and hold down the swat button. Move the defender in the position to make a play. It works similarly for catching the ball.


  • Corner routes (essentially a flipped post pattern where the receiver runs a diagonal route toward the corner) have always been a money route in NCAA or Madden. They're stoppable but it's often dangerous to leave them open. Protect these routes by playing a safety and covering the outside receiver when he breaks to the corner. Players using the corner routes typically roll outside so use containment or blitzes to pressure the quarterback.


  • When selecting your player on defense before the snap, you can hold the button and move the left thumbstick toward that player to select him. You don't have to hit the button until you finally reach that player.


  • When tackling, concentrate on containment. Instead of always charging the ball carrier, make sure you charge correctly and force the ball carrier to dodge toward other defenders. It's better to keep a ball carrier toward the middle of the field where help is than push the ball carrier outside where there's usually nothing but open field and sideline.


  • Don't forget the impact stick! Use the right analog stick to lay on the big hit. This is your best chance to cause a fumble--especially damaging if the ball carrier is trying some special moves.


  • If you recover a fumble or pick off a pass, try and get outside toward the sidelines and away from offensive players. It'll likely be your best chance to score. Don't forget you're now a ball carrier and can try special moves, though don't expect the player to be particularly skilled with them!


  • Help shut down an impact receiver by calling some double-teams. Look for defenses that double X or double Z, for instance. These formations will double a receiver with a corner and safety. Note that this could of course leave other receivers open!


  • If an opponent is abusing you with flat routes, call plays with linebacker man coverage for the backs or zone coverage that protects the flats (like a cover 2 defense).

Top Ten Defensive Linemen

The chart below reveals the top ten defensive linemen in NCAA Football 07. These top defenders are sorted by overall rating. Other stats include power and finesse moves and block shedding.

TEAMPLAYERTYPEIMPACTOVRSPDSTRAWRTAKPMVFMVBSHPRS
Clemson#93REYes998482888585988585
Nebraska#90REYes957487878693758092
Miami#98LEYes957884808475968080
Central Michigan#93LEYes958078848466647976
Tennessee#92DTYes946295809590659675
Ohio State#90DTYes946592858897859680
Florida#44DTYes946589859092938565
Cal#52DTYes946588868885758080
Georgia#94REYes948472857485978080
USC#96LEYes948480767685998590

Top Ten Linebackers

Here are the top ten linebackers as rated by NCAA Football 07. The linebackers are sorted by overall rating. Other stats include block shedding, pursuit, play recognition, and coverage skills.

TEAMPLAYERTYPEIMPACTOVRSPDAWRTAKBSHPRSPRCMCVZCV
Penn State#31LOLBYes988294949898996070
Ole Miss#49LOLBYes988790908399988572
Oklahoma#42ROLBYes968488919796986070
Virginia Tech#11LOLBYes968984888595856070
Florida#40MLBYes958787959697945070
West Virginia#43ROLBYes958290908195958167
Florida State#7ROLBYes958290928596955060
Georgia Tech#35LOLBYes958787868782938075
Alabama#42ROLBYes958688878596854560
Pittsburgh#51MLBYes948492899685978170

Top Ten Defensive Backs

A skilled secondary is key to shutting down an opponent's aerial attack. The following table lists the top ten defensive backs as rated by NCAA Football 07. These defenders are sorted by overall rating and include statistics such as play recognition, and skills in man and zone coverage.

TEAMPLAYERTYPEIMPACTOVRSPDAWRJMPTAKPRCMCVZCV
LSU#30FSYes9990909278978998
Miami#19FSYes9691878780909094
Cal#13CBYes9593949262759797
Arizona#5CBYes9595889365889895
Notre Dame#9SSYes9593858474858596
Virginia Tech#36SSNo9486868480867085
Utah#32CBYes9391948578979592
Michigan#29CBNo9393889365909693
Memphis#45FSYes9387878874928288
West Virginia#41SSNo9388878580808588

Chapter 6 - Online Tips

Playing NCAA Football 07 online is unpredictable. You may have picked up on tendencies of the CPU but anything goes against another human opponent (and that's not always a good thing). You may battle against a quality opponent that attempts to emulate realistic play or face off against the guy who calls the same play every single down. In this section, we've compiled some tips for competing against your online friends and foes.

  • If your alma mater is the Rice Owls, you may find online play an uphill battle. You should play prearranged games or unranked for comparable competition. Otherwise you'll likely run into the gangs of players using Ohio State, Texas, or USC. The highest ranked teams are certainly fun (and there's no denying they're good) but these NCAA powerhouses overpower the smaller schools. Watch your team selection and avoid getting rolled over by the guy who only wants to play as the #1 ranked Buckeyes.


  • Quarterback rollout passing seems pretty effective again this year (in last year's version, it was Vince Young rolling out play after play and connecting on deep receivers). "I only call one play every time!" players are out there and while you will suffer some of their big gains, these types of players are beatable. Make sure you get pressure on the quarterback. You can't allow these players to run around in the backfield and wait for the open man. Mix up your blitzes. If he's rolling out, call a corner blitz. Play some containment defenses. Force the quarterback to throw earlier to hopefully snag an interception and build the momentum. Manage the clock effectively to keep his defense on the field.


  • Utilizing your impact players is the same whether offline or online. These are your good to guys, both on offense and defense. While on offense, use your impact receivers or running back, especially when they're in the zone. But avoid running toward at an impact defender's area. Or perhaps avoid testing an impact defensive back. You could also use offensive impact players as decoys. If you notice an opponent concentrating heavily on your in the zone impact receiver, mix up your play call and get other receivers into the mix.


  • Momentum is the biggest new feature in NCAA Football 07. The team that has the momentum receives a boost to overall statistics. Build momentum on offense by consistent play, long gains, and, of course, scoring (get the first TD for a nice momentum bar chunk). With momentum established, you could call higher percentage plays to keep it in your favor or take chances with the added player boost provided by the new feature. If you're on the momentum short stick, you could call safer plays to help build it or take risks to get it back in one big shift.


  • Defensively you can build momentum through sacks, big hits, turnovers, and defensive scores. Just like offense, you could play the momentum meter two ways. With momentum in your favor, you could take fewer chances to avoid losing the edge. Then again you could take advantage of the edge and call more blitzes. If you lack momentum, you may need a big play to shift it back into your favor; that means more blitzes and bigger chances on defense to try and pick off a pass.


  • While on offense, mix up your play calling to keep your opponent's defense off guard. Most players will wait until you choose an offensive play to select their defense. This is because offensive personnel are revealed to the player on defense. The player on defense will see how many receivers, tight ends, and running backs are in the formation. Your opponent can use that information to call the defense. So it pays off to run out of pass-oriented formations (3+ WR sets) and pass out of run-oriented formations (multiple TE or 1 WR sets).


  • While on defense, wait for the player on offense to pick their play before you choose your defensive formation. Use the information provided by the offensive personnel to make your decision. Try to gauge your opponent's tendencies. Does he always run out of 2 WR, 1 RB sets? Does your opponent like to mix it up on 4 WR sets? Against an unpredictable opponent, you may have to avoid calling strictly pass or run defenses and instead call defenses that offer a little bit of both. Against a 4 WR set, you may call a Dime defense but with blitzing to try and disrupt a run play.


  • The clock can be your best friend or your worst enemy. With the lead, it's in your best interest to keep the clock moving. In a close game that's nearing its end, don't accidentally run out of bounds. Force your opponent to burn time outs. Take your time getting to the line and don't snap the ball until the play clock gets very low. Don't wait until "1 second" every time, though; if you do, your opponent could just use jump snap at 1 second and may get a big stop. Mix it up. Hike at 3 seconds, 4 seconds, etc.


  • If you're trying to make a comeback, realize the clock stops briefly with each first down. If you get a first down you can probably save your timeout and instead hurry to the line with a hurry up offense. Work the sidelines and try to get out of bounds but if your opponent is protecting the edge, take the open middle 10 or more yards downfield and utilize the brief stoppage of clock to get up to the line for the next play. Consider burning a timeout if your entire offense is exhausted after several hurry up plays.

Chapter 6 - Xbox 360 Achievements and Mini-Games

This section provides tips on unlocking the Xbox 360's NCAA Football 07 achievements and winning the 360's exclusive assortment of mini-games. We've included the entire achievement and offer tricks to unlocking some of the tougher feats. Strategies for winning Tug-of-War, Bowling, and Option Dash achievements are also featured.

Achievements

Naturally, NCAA Football 07 on the Xbox 360 includes an assortment of Achievements to unlock. Many of these achievements can be unlocked within a single game (or at most, a couple games). Certainly you could unlock these achievements during normal gameplay but if you're looking to elevate your gamer score quickly, there are a few tricks to easily achieve.

The table below reveals all NCAA Football 07 Xbox 360 achievements, their descriptions, and associated gamer points.

NAMEDESCRIPTIONGAMER POINTS
Throw 4 TD Passes in a GameThrow four touchdown passes in a single game.15
350 Total Passing YardsPass for 350 or more total yards in a game.15
200 Total Rushing YardsRush for 200 or more total yards in a game.15
No Fumbles in a GameDo not fumble in a single game.15
No Interceptions in a GameDo not throw an interception in a single game.15
Win by 21Win a game by 21 points or more.10
Pass to 5 Different ReceiversComplete a pass to 5 or more receivers in a single game.10
100 Yard ReceiverGain 100 or more receiving yards with a single player.10
100 Yard RusherGain 100 or more rushing yards with a single player.10
Complete a 30 Yard PassComplete a pass for 30 or more yards.10
Complete a 60 Yard PassComplete a pass for 60 or more yards.20
Break a 30 Yard RunBreak a run for 30 or more yards.10
Break a 60 Yard RunBreak a run for 60 or more yards.20
Allow No SacksDo not give up any sacks in a game.15
Intercept 2 PassesIntercept 2 passes in a single game.15
Recover 2 FumblesRecover 2 fumbles in a single game.15
Return Interception for a TDReturn an interception for a touchdown.20
Return Fumble for a TDScore a touchdown after recovering a fumble on defense.20
Make 4 SacksSack the opposing quarterback 4 or more times in a single game.20
Held Under 200 YardsHold the opposition to under 200 total yards.10
Held Under 100 YardsHold the opposition to under 100 total yards.25
2 Sack PlayerMake 2 sacks in a game with the same player.10
Score a SafetyScore a safety on defense.30
ShutoutPrevent your opponent from scoring any points in a single game.30
Punt Return for a TDReturn a punt for a touchdown.15
Kickoff Return for a TDReturn a kickoff for a touchdown.20
50 Yard Field GoalKick a 50 or more yard field goal.25
50 Yard PuntPunt the ball 50 or more net yards.15
Block a PuntBlock a punt25
Block a Field GoalBlock a field goal (or extra point)25
Score 35 PointsScore 35 points or more in a single game.15
500 Total YardsGain 500 total yards or more in a single game.25
#1 OffenseHave the #1 ranked offense in a dynasty season.25
#1 DefenseHave the #1 ranked defense in a dynasty season25
UndefeatedGo undefeated during a season in dynasty mode.10
Conference Champs!Win a conference championship game.10
Heisman Memorial TrophyWin the Heisman Memorial Trophy with a player on your dynasty team.25
5 Star RecruitingSign 8 or more 5 star prospects in your recruit class.25
Bowl WinWin a bowl game in dynasty mode.10
National Champions!Lead your team to a BCS championship in dynasty mode.25
Dynasty Trifecta!Win the National Championship in three back-to-back seasons in dynasty mode.50
Mr. FebruaryHave the #1 ranked recruiting class in a dynasty season.25
60 Year DynastyComplete 60 years of dynasty.100
Perfect GameBowl a 300 game.40
High Score Option DashScore 15,000 or more points in Option Dash.40
Win Tug-of-WarWin the Tug-of-War mini-game.40
Junior Varsity Level250 Gamerscore in NCAA Football 070
Varsity Level500 Gamerscore in NCAA Football 070
All-American Level750 Gamerscore in NCAA Football 070
Heisman Level1000 Gamerscore in NCAA Football 070

Many achievements have certain requirements, such as five minute quarters. Thankfully moving a defender blatantly offside isn't one of them.

One of the most important things to remember when going for NCAA Football 07 achievements is that several must be accomplished on the default setting of five minute quarters. For example, an achievement like "350 Total Passing Yards" is rather easy on 15 minute quarters but more of a challenge when time is of the essence. You should also be on Varsity difficulty level (apart from the mini-games, which can be completed on Freshman difficulty)).

Simply looking at the achievement provides no indication of the requirement; however, just realize that any achievement that would be easier to unlock in a longer game will require the default setting. If you think you've met the goal (like you just recovered two fumbles during the game) but you don't receive the acknowledgement of the unlocked achievement, check your quarter setting and make sure it's on five minute quarters.

As stated before, you will likely earn most of these through just normal play. However, there are a few things you can do to speed the process along! You guys who hoard gamer score points know who you are!

  • If you need to unlock the fumble achievements (recover two fumbles and score a TD on a fumble return), then play the game in heavy rain. There are many more fumbles during heavy precipitation. This provides many more chances to recover two fumbles and certainly many more chances to score a touchdown on a fumble return. If you need even more help, play against San Jose State!


  • Holding the opposition under 100 total yards (and 200 for that matter) is a bit tricky. Notice that the achievement is "total yards". This isn't simply offensive yards; this achievement also includes kick return yards! So you could blow out your opponent 63-0 in a defensive powerhouse but still not unlock this achievement cause you simply kicked off so many times! It's better to keep the game close and avoid giving your opponent easy return yards. If you must score then kick the ball out of bounds if you can't reach the end zone to prevent return yardage.


  • Need to give your kicking game a boost to unlock the field goal and punt achievements? You could select an appropriate equipped team (for instance, Colorado's superstar impact kicker). But if you want additional boost then adjust the Game AI sliders that affect human kicking and punting distance. Slide them to the max! Play a game and don't worry about first downs and such--just go for the long field goals and punts! You'll want to kick your field goal no closer than the 33 yard line for a 50 yarder. For a punt, just nail one from just beyond midfield and aim for the center of the endzone.


  • Holding an opponent scoreless can be challenging: unless you play against San Jose State and eat up as much clock as possible. Keep the Spartans' offense off the field by milking the play clock to the last possible second on each and every play (5 minute quarters). You'll be surprised how much time you can burn. You should be able to score a shutout in your first attempt.


  • Scoring a safety during normal play could take awhile: it's not a frequent occurrence. But you can help that along with some unusual play calling. Scoring a safety generally requires pinning your opponent deep--ideally at their one yard line. You could try a skillful punt...or you could try something easier. When driving into your opponent's territory, stop at the one yard line. You may have an easy touchdown, but don't score. Instead, run out of bounds at the one or just dive to the ground. Now instead of scoring, just call Spike Ball until you turn the ball over to the opposing team--at their one yard line. Now it's time to get that safety! Blitz your opponent wildly!


  • If you're still having trouble scoring a safety, there's an even easier method. Select the Game Rules setting and adjust the Offsides slider to 0. Now you will never be called for Offsides (unless you touch an offensive player before the snap). Get your opponent on their one yard line (described in the previous bullet point) then before the snap, line one of your defensive players next to your opponent's quarterback. As soon as the ball is hiked, tackle him!


  • You can use the Offsides method to block a field goal or punt. Note that you must block the kick, not simply tackle the kicker before he reaches the ball. You also can not hit the ball while it flies between the center and the holder. Just line up just to the left or right of the ball flight then charge the kicker and hit "Y" to jump and go for the block.


  • Decrease difficulty without actually decreasing difficulty by adjusting the Game AI sliders. Boost your abilities by shifting the "human" sliders to 100% and decrease the computer's ability by reducing the "CPU" sliders to 0%. Hey, all is fair in love and war right? That Offsides slider could be a key in unlocking many other achievements as well. Do you want them that much? Of course you do!


  • The 60-Year Dynasty achievement is easily simulated but it will take quite awhile to accomplish the task. If you don't mind your Xbox 360 playing without you, just let it ride and within several hours (go watch a couple movies) you'll have the coveted achievement.

Mini-Games

The Xbox 360 version features three mini-games linked to three achievements. The mini-games are Tug-of-War, Bowling, and Option Dash. Tug-of-War is the easiest achievement to unlock: you simply have to win the game. Bowling and Option Dash take more skill. But as with other achievements, you can tilt things in your favor with a few crafty team selections and difficulty maneuvering (the mini-game achievements will unlock on Freshman difficulty).

In Bowling, your team starts at the opponents' 10 yard line. If you score in one play, it's considered a strike. Score in two plays and it's a spare. Anything else is just points. It scores like Bowling. Strikes carry over points from the next two plays; spares carry over points from the next play. To unlock the achievement, you must score a perfect 300 in Bowling: that's scoring in 12 straight plays from the 10 yard line!

If you need a leg up in the Xbox 360 mini-games, tilt the action in your favor with team selection.

It's a challenge for sure and there are many, many ways you could achieve the task. One easy way we've found is to use a good option team (such as West Virginia) and call Power Option plays to the left and right (mixing it up). The option play provides, well, options on the way to the end zone. You could run in with the QB or pitch to the RB if necessary. West Virginia's agile QB and RB can easily smoke defenders, particularly if you select a weak team like...the good ole San Jose State Spartans!

In Option Dash, it's all about the option. You score points by gaining yardage. You boost your multiplier by performing special moves, such as juke, spin, pitch, fake pitch, break tackle, etc. The key is gaining big chunks of yardage with a big multiplier. Obviously scoring TDs is extremely important too.

Like Bowling, team selection is important. You'll want a good option team, such as West Virginia or Ohio State, and challenging a weak defense is also vital to success. Next you will need to perform different special moves every time you break into the open field. Complete a juke, spin, fake pitch, etc, every time you're in the clear. You should be able to nail 5x multiplier with each good run. Break one the distance with high multiplier and you will be very close to the 15,000 points required to unlock the achievement.

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