Is This the Last Console Generation?

Future shock.

by

Is the home game console market in trouble? Some analysts certainly think so. Despite reports of record-breaking sales for both the PlayStation 4 and Xbox One, some industry doomsayers are forecasting the end of the home console as we know it, citing increased competition from mobile games, a resurgent PC space, and spiraling costs in AAA-game development. So will the PS4, Xbox One, and Wii U be the last "generation" of consoles? Or will dedicated game machines continue to have a place in our living rooms for many more years to come? Check out what some of our editors think about this vexing issue.

Consoles have a future -- Justin Haywald

Consoles as we know them are going to go away at some point, but the Xbox One, PlayStation 4, and Wii U certainly won't be the last. Everyone always talks about the cloud, and that it's going to bring in some great ways to access updated content that does not require buying a new system with upgraded specs every couple of years. But there are a lot of obstacles that stand in the way of that future, with one of the biggest being a lack of cheap, widespread access to the Internet. Right now, decent Internet services are expensive, and even in a tech hot spot like San Francisco, not everyone has access to the faster speeds you need for reliable online gaming and multi-gigabyte downloading.

When and if those pipeline issues get cleared up across the county, we'll see rapid changes and a focus on delivering streaming gaming content, but without some technological innovation that can circumvent the virtual cable monopolies that rule our Internet connections, that future seems like a long way off.

There's going to be another round of consoles that provide the high-quality and immediate gratification that physical media provides.

Justin Haywald

But even then, the most vocal arguing for the death of the console say that the demand for another console itself is nonexistent because of the strength of casual, mobile experiences and the failure of so many AAA studios. Besides the fact that the people enjoying mobile games are a different audience entirely that extends beyond what we consider gaming, the movie industry provides a pretty good analogue to what we're seeing in games. There are a lot fewer middle-tier movies these days; you either have ultra-low-budget indie films or Hollywood mega-blockbusters. There's some middle ground, but generally if a studio wants to spend a lot of money, it wants a guaranteed success, while smaller indie outfits are able to take risks and work outside the system. Access to online streaming services like Netflix and Amazon Prime hasn't killed movie theaters; it has just made consumers more cautious about how they spend the $20 plus it costs one person to go see a film. And games are just the same: of course there's room for a $60 Grand Theft Auto V experience, but consumers aren't going to pay that for every game that comes along. Gaming studios may be changing, but there is still a strong demand for high-quality AAA games, and that isn't going away anytime soon.

Consoles have a future, but I think they're going to be less about providing an all-in-one media service (since more and more, our TVs take care of all of that for us); gamers still want something that fills their needs as gamers. And no matter what, I need a solid gaming experience that isn't dependent on whether I have the bandwidth for streaming HD graphics online. In a few years that will change, but there's going to be another round of consoles that provide the high-quality and immediate gratification that physical media provides.

The end can't come soon enough -- Tom Mc Shea

Exclusive is a dirty word. Games are the only medium where you have to buy a multitude of devices to enjoy everything out there. We briefly had this split with movies, where Blu-ray and HD-DVD vied for content, but the industry reached an agreement that elimated that separation. Imagine how annoying it would be if you could only watch CBS programs on one television while another broadcast NBC, and you needed a third set just for sports. We wouldn't stand for it. And yet, we've accepted that games are supposed to be like that. It's a mentality that will not last forever.

I hope that this will be the final console generation. Games need to adopt a universal standard so that segregation is no longer built into the ecosystem. I can't believe I'm going to praise the 3DO, but it's a model that's welcoming and oddly prescient if I have my way. Multiple partners brought their own version of the hardware to consumers, tearing down the boundaries that separate different consoles. Every game runs on every version of the 3DO, no matter whose name is imprinted on the front. Granted, no one wants to play Way of the Warrior (sorry Naughty Dog!), but the idea the system was built on is still a great compromise.

We're seeing Steam Machines now borrow those themes for the modern age. But we need more companies to cede to the inevitable future. After all, Steam Machines are nothing more than bite-size PCs, and we've already had variability and inclusion in that market for decades. No, what we need is for Sony, Microsoft, and Nintendo to jump into this pool. People will still buy whatever games these companies put out, but instead of forcing people to spend thousands so they can play Mario, Uncharted, and Halo on three different devices, they can coexist in one place.

Yes, I envision a magical future that's so idealized it hurts. But for games to grow even larger, we need to tear down the walls that confine us. There's no gain for people who just want to play games in our current ecosystem. None. So we should be happy if the dark days of exclusivity burn away, and we're left with a utopian industry where the best games can be played no matter which hardware you decide to purchase. Consoles are going to die off. It's just a matter of when.

Give the new consoles some time -- Daniel Hindes

To think that a supposed dip in launch sales of the latest generation of consoles could signify the end of consoles themselves is not looking at the bigger picture. Microsoft and Sony shot themselves in the foot by committing to a 10-year life cycle for the Xbox 360 and PlayStation 3. Those systems have become entrenched, offer a fantastic selection of games and excellent media functionality.

Gamers will be coaxed out of their 10-year comfort zones. Then we'll see numbers that won't spell doom and gloom.

Daniel Hindes

What are the new consoles offering? Few experiences that can yet justify the boxes' price tags (what kinds of numbers do you expect when you launch with Knack, or Ryse?) and media functionality that focuses on new, closed services rather than your existing library. But give it time. Must-play games will show up that won't also have previous-gen versions. Sony may introduce media functionality to the PS4 to bring it on par with the PS3. And all while the consoles themselves get cheaper. Gamers will be coaxed out of their 10-year comfort zones. Then we'll see numbers that won't spell doom and gloom.

But even if everything does go belly-up, we'll still have Steam Machines.

Don't lament the loss of traditional consoles -- Eddie Makuch

The Xbox One, PlayStation 4, and Wii U console generation very well might be the last. But don't cry at their funeral. Their impending death is not something to be afraid of, but rather a proposition we should be excited about. My prediction of their demise is not an indictment of their technical prowess--they are mightily powerful boxes, and I fully expect them to remain relevant for the next five years or longer. But do you really think we're going to be playing physical media eight to 10 years from now?

Some form of local hardware might remain, but it won't be much more than a channel through which your games are delivered. You need only look at video services like Netflix and Amazon Instant for evidence that this is the future gamers are in for. Just this week Amazon announced its own set-top box, and it's a wonderful window into the future you can expect for gaming. It streams TV and movies, and it plays games. Not Grand Theft Auto V or Skyrim, sure, but don't you think we're headed that way?

What's more, platform holders like Sony and Microsoft are already preparing for and investing in this future. Sony snapped up Gaikai in 2012 for $380 million and put it to work on the streaming service PlayStation Now. Meanwhile, Microsoft has been open in saying its network of Azure cloud servers are capable of streaming full games. It's only a matter of time before these services--as well as some we don't even know about--become commonplace. Don't lament the loss of traditional consoles; be excited about the future and what's to come.

Discussion

758 comments
ragna535
ragna535

These guys can't even keep their own servers up and running without significant interruptions and downtimes for gamers....and you want me to be excited about a prospect of an entire system being on the network.....yeah...ok.

AceRoccola
AceRoccola

I'm always amused when people talk about transcending physical media. We still have a LOT of progress to make in order to make that viable. Internet speeds and even network speeds in the US just don't cut it. If we want to live in a cyberpunk future, we're going to have to wrest control over our access to the web from greedy corporations. The US pays more for internet, and gets less for that money, than any comparable nation. It's a joke. 

oldtobie
oldtobie

I like the idea of everyone having a Steambox/PC so the exclusive-AAA midset can die.

Link2Hyrule
Link2Hyrule

 Except for one person these guys are pretty much all saying the same thing:  Once the technology becomes advanced and widespread enough, and certain business practices go out the window, Console systems will become unnecessary because we'll all be able to play our games, especially resource-heavy ones, on PCs or other "universal" gaming machines.  The studios themselves will remain to make the games, but they will not be restricting them to singular systems.  I personally won't mind if this comes to pass, as long as I can play games I'm happy.

sonic_rareware8
sonic_rareware8

God please don't remind me this, it's making me feel old and feeling like I'm living in a vault. -_-

heguain
heguain

PC Master Race, so it doesn't matter.

Tanares
Tanares

Doomed?  Less than a year ago, GTAV made record sales, eclipsing all other forms of entertainment in the written history of human kind. And that is not an exaggeration.


I believe consoles may no longer be shackled to TVs in the future, things like the iPad are what consoles will become. We're talking some time down the road though.

Zodiarck
Zodiarck

I've been a gamer for 25 years, and while it's rather sad that I've dedicated so much of my life to 'playing' something - I can say without a doubt that it makes me qualified to make predictions on the future of the industry on the simple basis that I've experienced so much change and heard so many predictions and hype about these things time after time over the last few decades. So many times in fact, that I feel numb when I read or listen to conversations or arguments such as this one.


So here's my two cents on this, and it's all I can offer since I'm not god, and can no better predict the future than a ant can predict the life span of a human:


I think the current generation of video-game consoles - primarily the existing top-three (PS4, XBOX ONE, Wii U) - are products of what will be the last generation of closed ecosystem game machines we will see. Perhaps, there will be a revision or two of the PS4, or XBOX ONE, and perhaps nintendo may slide out a slightly more powerful (cheaper made) version of the Wii U with a new moniker. However, make no bones about it; the era of exclusivity in the media/entertainment industry as a whole is quickly fading. 


There will always be rivalries, and no doubt we'll see exclusivity ALWAYS exist in some form or fashion (just look to IOS versus OS or the fact that Titanfall is a Origin exclusive and not on Steam) - but instead of the game industry being hemorrhaged by competing powers, we'll simply see a few reason presented why to buy one product or service versus another. I doubt the future of gaming will be anywhere near as splintered as we've seen in the tech and gaming industry in the last decade. I predict that future game & system choices will result in little more than minor complaints by people about perks or services. I already see this in other areas: AMD vs Nvidia? DX11 vs Mantel? They offer virtually the same thing, with only a minor perk here and there. Netflix vs Amazon? THIS is where gaming is heading. 


The Future of gaming is different manufacturers offering the same hardware with different upgrade options - hardware that plays the exact same products across the board at virtually the exact same spectrum of settings, and with little differentiation in software. Infact, that future isn't even that far off, as the game industry of today is looking very much like that vision - with PC gaming having grow leaps in bounds over the last 3 years to the point where console exclusives are becoming commonly ported to PC platforms, and PC indies are quickly finding homes on our new consoles. Developers need money after all, and parity across the board is the best answer.


Will streaming games ever become the mainstream approach to enjoying video games, like it is with movies and television shows? No. Video-gaming requires not only high Download Speeds, but also High Upload speeds - something that isn't quite available across the board to everyone yet - and may never be. I think a realistically the future of game IS Digital, and considering the diaconomy of my own local Gamestop, it looks like that a digital future isn't very far off (perhaps only four or five years away). 


I envision the digital future of gaming resembling the current models presented by STEAM, and Origin - being a future where gamer's access various thridparty manufactures hardware (whether it be steam machines, or Sony boxes, or whatnot) and download full games thru services that offer them, and play them at universally accepted hardware settings. What box you choose, and who you decide to spend your time buying your games from will be totally up to the consumer. But more importantly; the consumer wouldn't have to worry about hardware variances make games unplayable to them, not having enough money to buy a game machine (thanks to universal parity & competing manufacturers), nor worrying if their internet connections are fast enough to support the kind of high-level streaming that Cloud HD gaming would require - simply having a solid connection and moderate DL speed would be enough to fully download a game off a service and onto your Hard-drive).


So are consoles as we know it going to exist forever? No. Will This be the last generation? Most likely. How long will Sony or Microsoft be viable players in the game industry? For as long as they are willing to adapt - if they also adopt a open model after this console cycle, they too can compete in the same realm as steam-machines, and whatever other boxes come our way. 


In the 90's we all though Microsoft was going to take over the computer sector, and in the early 2000's a reinvented  Apple came along and changed that. Then it looked a bit there like Apple and its ipod, iphone, ipad, and IOS would kill of all all competition in the mobile market - but then android and windows slipped in and have been steadily taking that back. The reality is, that in this day and age,choice and the promise of universal compatibility & connectivity are what people what. They don't want constrained to one ecosystem and made dependent on a service or manufacturer who may or may-not respect their pocketbook. 


jukethenuke
jukethenuke

 I personally believe console gaming has just begun. We are starting to see some truly amazing console exclusive games like The Last of Us, Resogun, Dead Rising 3, Grand Theft Auto V (As of right now), Gears of War 3, Little Big planet 1 and 2, and please do not forget all the wonderful exclusives Nintendo has to offer. A vast majority of these games are single player, but with time and patience we will be seeing many more amazing online experiences. I could right a book about the advantages home consoles have in the industry. I am not saying they are better than PC, but they are definitely "easier."

Hopefully one day console players and PC players can come together and stop bickering. But until that day arrives, the vide games industry will keep moving at the pace it is moving at.

JulyAeon
JulyAeon

If the case is of trying to force the customer to buy peripherals that the customer already didn't take to (like the kinect) and selling lackluster games that are full of bugs that won't be addressed after the customer bought the game at full prize than maybe yes.  The moronic marketing swallows too much off the budgets for franchises and that should be addressed as well.  Sell the customer what they want (to a healthy degree) and stop trying to sell them what the marketing people think they should pressure the customer to think that they need something they really don't.  The new x1 and ps4 are just very expensive upgrades with lots of social and media gimmicks that I have no use for and that I don't want.


Personally I prefer to use my computer, but I do have a xbox360 that I used fairly well until the next gen came into the picture and all the updates from then on have totally put me off and I now refuse to switch the damn thing on and go through all the extras that drive me absolutely to distraction.  I just want to sit down and play a certain game without letting the whole world know what I am doing.  

And after all that I am still convinced the next gen will not be leading me to a better gaming experience since eye candy graphics and multi player only games are not on my priority list.  All I want is a quality game and that I haven't experienced at all in the last few years.

 

focuspuller
focuspuller

I agree with every Tom had to say. Is the day of consoles over? God I fucking hope so.

timothyt
timothyt

Personally I think what will end for consoles is EVERY game coming out at the same price point.  Perfect example is Kinnect Sports Rivals.  At $59 it's a no-brainer - I won't buy it.  At $29 I wouldn't buy it.  Things get more interesting around $19 though.  My quality bar drops a LOT and I will buy games I otherwise would pass on (or RENT from GameFly or a local video store/Redbox).  What developers and especially publishers need to let go of is this idea that the $60 non-AAA game is acceptable.  There's a number of games I did NOT buy for PS4 or XBox One (I own both) because I'm not paying $60 for them: Ryse, Thief, Knack, Kinnect Rivals, all worth $29-$39 but not $60 - ESPECIALLY when you consider the replay value of games like Ryse, Thief and Knack (at least Rivals has some party-game replay value).


If the iPhone/Apple Store/Android revolution has taught us anything, it's that developers and publishers can still make a LOT of money by selling games cheaper.  People are also much more likely to become IAP/DLC purchasers if they didn't spend $50-60 buying the original game.


I hope consoles move towards a model more like the forthcoming EverQuest Next and Planetside 2 - let everyone play the game for free (eliminating the need for a demo build) and sell premium character classes and upgrades, but carefully balance them so the "free" players still want to play.  The Pay-To-Play model like a lot of mobile games are moving to won't be successful on consoles, but if people don't feel continually milked, just ENTICED to buy content like levels and new character classes, there's still a lot of money to be made in the console market.

slfite
slfite

Love my PS3 which has more functionality than the new PS4. The PS3 exclusives read like a gaming hall of fame. I can live without Halo. I'm not even sure that MS is committed to the Xbox long term. They (MS) are losing money on the hardware and they're almost completely out of content creation. Where's the profit potential for them? The only drawback in the long run for consoles is the challenge of turning out new creative games. I play one game after another and I'm finishing AC4 and there's only Watch Dogs on the horizon. Last, let's stop suggesting that mobile games are competing with console games ... apples and oranges.

cratecruncher
cratecruncher

The console producers haven't helped themselves this generation.  First they told everyone they're getting loads of DRM and to "deal with it".  Then people discovered there weren't any great games for the units at launch.  Now we're discovering the specs aren't nearly as impressive as the hype made them out to be.  They do come in a shiny colorful box but that's probably not a good enough reason to buy one.


Console hardware is only one piece of the gaming puzzle and I think the whole console business model is a sneaky one.  By subsidizing the initial outlay on the console with the future profits from the games that will only work on that box they deceive busy consumers into thinking it costs less than pc gaming.


If one considers the Total Cost of Ownership pc gaming wins because of overall lower title prices and periodic blowout sales.  PC's offer more spec variety, generally better performance, better game prices and more convenient game shopping too (GOG, Steam).  If you can turn a screwdriver the savings get even better.  The mid-range components are commodity priced because they all fit a standard format.  Older games in your collection aren't unplayable when you change "generation" either.  I love playing my old classic games and that's an important consideration.


As virtual reality becomes a bigger influence on gaming the pc will further outpace the console rigs with faster development, lower prices and better performance.  For serious gaming the console model is toast.

FallenOneX
FallenOneX

From this article, 3 out of 4 want some form of set top box as the next "console". I'm all for it if they can work out any and all bandwidth issues (cost, availability, cost, sped requirements) and memory issues. Looking at the PS4 and XB1 so far, a TB HD would have to be mandatory, unless they plan on still using some form pf physical media. I think the industry could make a move in this direction in about two more generations, tops.

RoOhDiNi
RoOhDiNi

 Gaming is doomed! - I'm going outside and play some Basketball :P

CavScout00
CavScout00

This has to be the stupidest thing I've read on the internet today. How many PS3s and 360s are out there?

Most people won't buy a new console unless they can afford it. The cost to play consoles and games targeted for mass audiences has went skyhigh since they first came around. Last time I checked wages for the working class have been stagnant for decades.

The 10 year life cycle of the last gen turned console gaming into a billion dollar industry. Now noones in a hurry to abandon their current library and pay 400-500$ for a new console with limited titles, so everyones screaming doomsday for the gaming industry.

If people cant afford it their not going to buy it period.

assertive_user
assertive_user

This topic gets thrown around at the beginning of every generation...

FighterforJC
FighterforJC

This talk is laughable.  I could understand if we didn't just have record-breaking console launches for both the PS4 and Xbox One and games were being cancelled left and right.  This is just another liberal agenda to precondition our minds to accept the new meaning of ownership.  MS tried it with their initial announcement of the Xbox One's online requirements and found out the hard way people weren't ready to give up their ownership, at least when it comes to video games.  Gamespot and IGN can talk this up for the next 7 years and perhaps people would've been brainwashed by then.

FighterforJC
FighterforJC

How bout this for games being treated like movies.  Make the game downloadable to be played for a limited time (say, 2-3 weeks), but for about half the price of retail.  This would be the "box office" equivalent.  Then a few weeks later release a physical hardcopy for players to own, at full price, if they really loved the game.  

SpookyJack
SpookyJack

We need a new competitor. Sega Dreamcast 2.

rickphoenixxx
rickphoenixxx

People are even buying OLD consoles off ebay to experience those classic games. People buy consoles for many reasons and there will always be a market for them. The digital camera market died due to smartphone cameras....but the pc is not generally used for gaming by the masses and that will never change.

rad8045
rad8045

why is it the more they sell the more they say it's dying ?

OtherFabbros
OtherFabbros

Of course yes, think about: 


- New PS4 (400 Euros) + Game at Dayone (65/70 Euros) + Online Pass (5Euros) = 470 Euros

- New Xbox One (500 Euros) + Game at Dayone (65/70 Euros) + Online pass (10 Euros) = 570 Euros  


Wiht 500 Euros you can build a high-end gaming PC, even more powerful, game cost less than 40 Euros, and online is Free. 



battlefront1943
battlefront1943

I really believe this is the last generation of consoles.

Why?

Hardware costs too much to develop and manufacture on a mass scale.  That's why the majors are moving toward becoming cross-platform service providers (ie PLAYSTATION NOW).  To play a game across devices only depends on servers, internet, and a controller/input device.  At that point it will be all about the branded content -- games, shows, movies, etc.

If PLAYSTATION NOW is successful with launch this summer, I really do think we're nearing the console end...  and that kinda makes me sad.  I liked the idea of buying a gaming platform and games instead of simply a shell and "leasing" service.      



SolidTy
SolidTy

Is this the last console generation?

---

lol.

This question is literally been asked years ago and the years before that. It's the question to ask when new generations start. Heck, Bill Gates claimed that the console gens were going down during the PSOne/N64/Saturn days in interviews with Next Generation.  If you can't beat them, join them. As we all know now, Gates went on later to support the development of a home console, the Xbox O.G. 

Comedy website with a touch of clickbate, I like it. Get more opinions from the news report team too.


Sikrion
Sikrion

So all that will be left is handhelds and mobile devices seeing as how pc gaming and console gaming are dying/dead.


This is the first generation of new consoles that I haven't been reading about from night til day saving up my cash to buy them sometime in the first month, to be honest I have 0 interest in any of the new gen systems (with the exceptions of handhelds which i keep considering only to decide wait for the 2000 version and a price drop.)

However neither pc gaming or console gaming is dying, just changing.

kachan64
kachan64

I think after PS5 then the console generation might be end. If you think about it, the original xbox and xbox 360 a kind of like families the same with ps2 and 3 where they all run the same sort of architecture. I think there will be another one like that in this generation.

diego_corleone
diego_corleone

Just another article from Gamespot trying to be cool with the pc players, nothing new, move on....

wretch1d
wretch1d

Yes thats why the the last launch was the biggest console launch ever and was extremely successful and has only just begun with many many people still holding for games to come, i know this is click bait but come on

FighterforJC
FighterforJC

As I said on my previous post, this generation as well as the last, has tons of great games you can stock up on.  If this indeed is the last generation of consoles, and it very well could be if the liberals had their way, then whatever the next generation of gaming becomes 10 years from now will not have any game worth playing nor will any of them look as good as anything we'll see on the PS4/ Xbox One.  The only people clamoring for the end of console gaming are jaded PC-only gamers that only have Counter Srike and world of warcraft, and Wii U owners.

Zodiarck
Zodiarck

@jukethenuke  


The way I see it, console exclusivity isn't better today than it was 7 years ago - or even 14 years ago. Many of the games you mentioned are several years old, and most developers who focused on consoles exclusives have shuttered there doors over the last few years, or adapted a multiform approach. Even many of Microsofts own XBOX exclusives (such as Titanfall, Halo Spartan Assault, and Below) are available on PC through steam or origin. 


Many of the prominent developers such as bungie and 2K have turned from pasts of exclusive franchises to multiform titles. When PS2, GC and XBOX can out exclusives where plentiful, and [while to a lesser degree] where a staple of the first 3 years of XBOX 360, Wii, and PS3 - to such an extent that many of today's AAA games are sequels or annual installments of franchises from that period (AC and Uncharted for example). 


The Launch of the Wii U, PS4 and XBOX ONE had their exclusives, but I feel that was a purposeful intention by the hardware manufactures to create the illusion of plentiful exclusives 0 when in reality there where practically no games at launch, and by simply having 2 or 3 exclusives per system, they guaranteed that 40% of the launch games where exclusives. Compare that to past launches where systems had 7 or 8 exclusives a piece on launch day. 


Some people say "a wave of exclusives is on it's way, you just wait" - but if you look at the future map of releases each publisher has laid-out so far to the public, and have read the news lately and seen how many AAA developers and publishers have had to cancel project for these new systems, and the alarming amount of them that have had to go out of business, layoff employees, or restructure themselves into indie development companies - it's hard to believe people like you could believe anything otherwise. 

Zodiarck
Zodiarck

@cratecruncher  


Have you seen Morpheus? By having hardware (CPU, GPU, etc) offloading the work to the headset instead of the system, the PS4 is actually able to do the exact same thing as Oculous rift or any other virtual reality product. So as a fellow PC gamer I have to shoot down the notion that Virtual reality isn't possible on console because of console limitations.


That isn't not to say I don't completely agree with you that virtual reality is most likely going to be the future of gaming - just imagine never having to buy a 2k  monitor or big screen tv again!? you strap on a $400 headset, and BAM! your engulfed in seamless reality.


What'll kill current console model is the lack of exclusives and a unwillingness by the public to pay $400 & $500 dollars for a game console - especially in a age where people what 'choice'. Consoles still follow that age old Cable package mentality of 'if you want scifi channel you gotta buy the bigger package - and too bad if you don't want the GameShow Channel, your stuck with it - you wanna trade them out? No, you gotta buy the pricier package!'

slfite
slfite

@cratecruncher Can't agree that pc wins on total cost of ownership. I can sell or buy used console games easily. DRM kills used games.  To each their own, but don't be chauvinistic about it.

Zodiarck
Zodiarck

@RoOhDiNi  very smart dude. Sorta reminds me of the end of last season of Southpark - when the boys finally all got XBOX ONES, got home, got board with them in about a hour, and then decided outside was better.

quakke
quakke

@RoOhDiNi  

Yes, as long as money is the main goal only, gaming is doomed. If people lighten up, and start thinking something else but this ($$$) for a change, then stuff might be on the way to heal. If they don't lighten up, then the next industry-wide crash will take care of them for sure.

Either you publishers lighten up or you collapse since you were too stupid to know how to make games.

quakke
quakke

@assertive_user  

Except gaming hasn't been this fragile since 1983, and we all know what happened to gaming back in 1983..

Zodiarck
Zodiarck

@rad8045  Because it don't matter how much of something you sell, if your selling it at a loss. Don't forget that outside of manufacturing costs, these companies spent B.I.L.L.I.O.N.S. in R&D and billions more in conferences, expos, and advertising. They aren't just console manufacturers either; both Sony and Microsoft are companies that primarily deal with technology other than gaming, and they have shareholders who wan their money back AND a profit. Sony and Microsoft aren't console companies, and they don't simply have to sale something and BOOM they are rich - what little they make back often leaves their hands and enters the pockets of shareholders. Besides; in Sony and Nintendo's cases - it actually costs MORE for them to actually build their consoles than they sell them for in most countries!? Why'd they do this? They figured they'd take an initial loss on production, and make it back in strong software sales - but that hasn't happened yet - and considering the way the game industry is on the development of things at the moment, its doesn't seem like Sony or Nintendo will be making up for there loses for a very long time.

FighterforJC
FighterforJC

@rad8045  It's called "denial" or "wishful thinking" or "jealousy," take your pick.  It all comes from PC-only gamers and Wii U owners.

FighterforJC
FighterforJC

@OtherFabbros  lol there you go again with the mythical "high end pC." even if such a thing existed it has no exclusive games to show for, and it all you can play on PC's are RTS's.

Dasein808
Dasein808

@FighterforJC  "The only people clamoring for the end of console gaming are jaded PC-only gamers that only have Counter Srike and world of warcraft, and Wii U owners."


I've actually never played CS, but I spent some time in WoW many years ago. I've also owned a console of some form from the ColecoVision up to my 360. I see no game or technological reason to buy either of the latest offerings. I only bought my 360 for Dead Rising and it was later ported.


The people "clamoring for the end of console gaming" are typically the ones that want a universalized scalable gaming platform that's not hamstrung by closed systems and decade long lifecycles.


That platform also exists already, but MS still has a bit too much say with their DirectX restrictions that prevent users of older versions of Windows from utilizing the latest version of DirectX.


This is another problem that the Steamboxes will hopefully address by forcing MS' hand.

sicness277
sicness277

@Zodiarck @sicness277 @quakke @assertive_user  If the nickel and diming wasn't working they wouldn't be doing it. The problem isn't so much the industry taking advantage of consumers, it's consumers purchasing the DLC that they're releasing and being okay with it. 

This is all ignoring the indie scene as well though. Especially on PC (and likely even more so with the new generation of consoles), the indie scene is as much of a driving force as AAA games are and are proof that anyone can make it onto the scene. And more product is nothing but good for the industry. 

The reason the gaming industry crashed in 1983 isn't because of nickel and diming, but because of publishers pushing bad, and in most cases extremely bad, games onto consumers with absolutely nothing to make up for it in (i.e. good games). The industry at that time was polluted with horrible games and that's why it crashed, people refused to buy them. Right now we have the exact opposite of that problem with dozens of good games (AAA and indie alike) coming out every year that justify you purchasing a console or PC. The current market is far from fragile. It has some bad business choices, but that doesn't define the market at all, especially when those bad business choices aren't being ignored by the average consumer. 

So in reality the industry is stronger than ever not just because we have choices in games, but choices in the producers of those games as well. We don't have just big budget games, but a variety of games, "polluting" the market with so many games right now that no one would have the time to even play just the good ones. Don't let a few bad business decisions bias your mind into thinking the market is weak right now, because it's far from it and will be for a very long time. 

Zodiarck
Zodiarck

@sicness277 @quakke @assertive_user  


There is a huge gape between what developers are making versus what publishers are getting. And there is an even larger gap in how much money it takes to actually make a game these days versus how much profit game makers are getting back in returns. Bottom line, it's not enough, and they are constantly looking for ways to nickle and dime consumers to correct this. But it's evident that it's not working, and many of them are closing up shop, or moving down the road to low-budget indie development. The big guys that are sticking around...well they look like they have a bleeding wound on their sides, and every month it appears like alot of these companies are losing more profits and edging more and more to the brink themselves. If that don't constitute a fragile market to you, then what does? Skynet taking over and sending thousands of T-1000's out to annihilate us all? :P