Hollywood & Games: helping hype each other

Seamus Blackley, Will Kassoy, and Gordon Paddison hold court at elite Beverly Hills event to talk crossover marketing strategy.

Seamus Blackley
LOS ANGELES--Seamus Blackley has an impressive resume. He joined the game industry in the early 1990s, when he helped develop Ultima Underworld and System Shock at Looking Glass Studios. By the end of the decade, he was helping organize Microsoft's Xbox launch team, and acted as the nascent console's main spokesperson after it launched in 2001. Blackley then went on to cofound doomed game-development consortium Capital Entertainment Group before joining Hollywood powerhouse Creative Artists' Agency as an agent.

Blackley certainly looked and sounded like a player when he moderated a panel at the Hollywood and Games Summit earlier this week at the Beverly Hills Hotel. Despite the balmy conditions outside, he wore a slick suit, the ensemble topped off with his signature gold earring. He was also the most vocal participant in the panel he was ostensibly moderating, which was titled "Establishing the Buzz for Collaborative Franchises."

Like the rest of the elite event, the panel focused on how the game and film industries can profit from one another, and Blackley warmed up the crowd by asking the collaborating sides to identify themselves. "Raise your hand if you're from Hollywood?" he asked, eliciting a few arms to go aloft. "Now raise your hand if you're from the game business," he queried, sending a forest of limbs launching skyward. To those few who didn't raise their hand, Blackley joked, "And where are the rest of you from, the porn business?" Then, a woman raised her hand. Blackley grinned naughtily, and told her to "meet me later."

As the title "Establishing the Buzz for Collaborative Franchises" suggests, this particular panel discussed how to market games based on movies--and vice versa. Present were two experts at marketing film-game crossovers: Gordon Paddison, New Line Cinema's executive vice president of integrated marketing, and Will Kassoy, Activision's vice president of global brand management. Of course, Blackley was also on hand to do his particular brand of moderating, which consisted of at times overwhelming the panel with his own comments.

Although his stately air evoked imposing actor Frank Langella (Good Night and Good Luck), Paddison kicked off what turned out to be an informal session. He began by emphasizing there were a "lot of different venues for exposure," particularly if "the game window follows the release of the film." As an example, he used the Pringles potato chips promotion that helped hype Electronic Arts' The Lord of the Rings: Return of the King, which was based on the eponymous final chapter in New Line's epic fantasy trilogy.

Paddison also cited the Lord of the Rings games as a "fine example" of coordination between filmmakers and game designers. He mentioned how writer-director-producer Peter Jackson and his production company, Wingnut Films, were "involved on every level" of making EA's various LOTR games. He also pointed out this level of cooperation led to many film clips, most of the film's voice cast, and almost all its art assets being incorporated into the games.

The youthful-looking Kassoy quickly chimed in with an anecdote about one of his own projects. To facilitate the game adaptation of the computer-animated comedy Over the Hedge, Activision set up an office on the Dreamworks Animation lot. Kassoy said the "exact same" character models were used in both the film and the console versions of the game. "The lines are clearly blurring," he said.

However, Paddison warned that a close working relationship between publishers and movie studios are does not guarantee a quality movie-based game. "Transferring the emotional elements from the film to the game is one of the biggest challenges," said Paddison. "There is a bit of a disconnect when it comes to taking the story and character from a film to a game, and that's something we have to watch out for... A lot of [the] time games based on films are a case of fitting a square peg in a round hole."

Paddison also said similar problems exist with movies based on games, and discussed the 1995 New Line film Mortal Kombat, which was directed by summit keynote Paul W.S. Anderson and based on the titular Midway Games arcade fighter. "Fifty thousand years ago we had Mortal Kombat, which we wanted to be a mainstream film," he joked. "Problem is you don't want to get that stink of 'we want this film to be just for gamers.'" "I like to think of that as a fine perfume," Blackley quipped, to moderate laughter.

For his part, Kassoy said that he felt that more than any other, role-playing games are the most promising--and untapped--genre for film-game crossovers. His justification was that while films often elicit an emotional response so deep that people will shed tears, the main emotion action games--the most common fodder for big-screen adaptations--bring is merely shallow thrills. "I think the potential is there to have a game that makes you cry when your character dies," he said, speaking of film-inspired RPGs.

When asked about how machinima, the most direct convergence between narrative motion picture and interactive gaming, could be used as a marketing tool, Kassoy dissembled somewhat. He said that saying each game is its own specific animal, and that there are various techniques to sell each one. He did say that machinima had its place, and used Heavy.com's Heavy Machinima channel as an example of where it could be successful.

Blackley quickly gave his two cents' worth. "I think it's just a matter of time until machinima becomes a major tool [for marketing games and film]," citing the growing number of machinima clips on Myspace.com as an example. He also praised how, by using game engines to tell linear stories, machinima is helping remove the wall between film and games. "My job description is to try and break down that wall," boasted Blackley.

Then it was on to more practical matters--namely, the problems that arise in trying to develop a game based on a major motion picture. Kassoy offered an ongoing project as an example. He said Activision is actively sharing all assets of the upcoming Transformers film with Digital Domain, the production company Transformers director Michael Bay recently bought. Kassoy said Activision is shooting for a "day and date" release alongside the film on July 4, 2007.

However, Kassoy expressed the difficulty of doing such simultaneous releases, given the much longer development cycle of a game versus production cycle of a film. "We're just finalizing our Christmas 2008 slate," said Kassoy. "The primary challenge is to get ahead of the curve, since movies are often only shot 11 months before they hit theaters."

Paddison concurred, citing unnamed New Line production schedules. "We'll have [film] projects that get greenlighted just eight months before they are supposed to be released," he said. "So we don't have any real preproduction time. It's just like 'everyone get on the boat.'"

So when will the production processes of games and films become truly unified? Kassoy thinks it's already happening: "I think there's a lot of core connectivity between games and film," he said. Paddison differed slightly, saying that the production process of the two was still a ways off. "When the heads of [film] studios reach the age [at] which they are gamers, things will be a lot different," he surmised.

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101 comments
eddyissa
eddyissa

games are games movies are movies... if you should want to create a movie based on a game its a pretty stupid idea not unless you have acutally planned it out to be like that.. in the sense if you want a movie out of a game it should be pre planned not something that comes around just cos the game did well... books to movie fine... the script is there a movie is just a way of a director showing his vision and bringin creativity to e screen and just making the experience more (tho some time words tell it better than pictures) and movies to games also aint that bad.. there again the script is alraedy written.. but games to movies???? the script is there true but for each person how that script played out would be a complete individual experience.. which is why i think the only thing in this interview which showed promise is the last comment... "When the heads of [film] studios reach the age [at] which they are gamers, things will be a lot different,"... btw its not a complete loss... final fantasy did really well.. and doom also wasnt all that bad... so who knows,... just like adapting books to the screen was considered a dead loss at e beginnin its now a common place thing ps... on the other hand it might be a pretty mediocre thing for the rest of its life... remember books to movies have made it good but movies to books???? maybe the future of games to movies could stay like that.... and till halo comes out im leavin it as more likely than not..

ErikB0869
ErikB0869

When was the last, good movie-based game, anyway?

tehbighead
tehbighead

ace, silent hill got a whopping FOUR-POINT-FIVE out of ten on rottentomatoes.com. please cease and desist your fanboyism and get off your wretched-film pulpit. you may have enjoyed the movie, as may have several thousand other filmgoers. that does not make it a "good" film. :|:|:|

ace244
ace244

quote (firebreathing I don't really like how the Silent Hill movie turned out. It seemed too short, didn't really have that Silent Hill feel to it. It seemed like I wasjust watching another horror movie. I bet it was worse for the people who hadn't even played the game before, confusion up the ass. ) first off your wrong, the movie was awesome, it made a ton of money and it had a lot of good user reviews, where do you come up with that bs? and everyone i know who didnt play the game enjoyed the movie because it was something different and not the same bs people keep putting on the screen. just because you didnt enjoy it doesnt mean the rest of us didnt i (and a lot of other people if you spent some time to do some research) for one enjoyed the movie and cant wait for the next one P.S. i think R.E. sucked both of them

Sidrat2004
Sidrat2004

Cyphen X Wrote (among other stuff) "....Becuase every medium has it's own strengths and weaknesses, we can't simply take an item from one medium and place it into another one in which it doesn't belong, we have to use the strengths of each medium to create different experiences that build on each other to become greater than the sum of their parts. " Never a truer word has been written. The three mediums are their own seperate journey. They can be based either within the same universe, world, stage setting and be a totally unique story with the same characters, or if they want to follow the same story but they MUST deliver the same backstory and settings in either case. You couldn't really put Batman, into a non gothic city and expect the same result, or could you? Play a quest from Oblivion. Any quest it doesn't matter. Now, turn it into a feature length film or fifteen minute short. The quests tell a story in chapter form, and having the individual elements involved in the story would be an easy task. It wouldn't necessarily be interesting or long, depending on the quest, or quest line, but it's a story nonetheless, which is half the battle. The first game to movie I played was Batman The Movie for the spectrum. Cost was £9.99 UK Pounds. A lot for a spectrum game on cassette, let me tell you. But there were multiple elements, platforming, driving, puzzle game to solve the ingredients that were poisoned. It was a great addition to the movie. Linear yes, but in those days every game was linear. So what will the future bring? All the businesses involved is cyclical in nature, book releases don't happen every day, movies aren't released every week and games that are worth playing get released twice a year at most. If there's a good setting and characters, it can be turned into all three mediums. Discworld for example has it's own 29+ (maybe more) books that flesh out the world of the same name. The cities, countries and technology has evolved from the first book and Ankh Morpork in particular has trolls and dwarves. The stories already exist and there are animated films out there if you can find them. Where's the games?? The good free roaming RPG game where you wake up in Ankh Morpork as a troll, dwarf or human and start living doing quests, earning money?? I wish I knew why Pratchett hasn't allowed it to occur, maybe copyright agreements are really that biased in favour of the production company, maybe not. JK Rowling is still writing the books and cashing in on the multiformat games, so why not?? The industries will merge when technology allows playing a game will be next to acting in a movie. Already there's the DDR arcade things, and the Eye Toy has some fun effects, so the future looks bright for everyone even if you're not a gamer.

IronMoose
IronMoose

i agree with 1SleepyGit. Hollywood sucks. The Lord of the Rings was a book first who didn't know that?

1SleepyGit
1SleepyGit

I'm sorry, Ishould care what this guy says? I have no respect for hollywood and I have no respect for people who claim to be the 'elite' of gaming, who gave him this rank and why should I honour it? I don't know this guy and I have read nothing of why I should care what he says. Hollywood has become shallow, and if gaming joins with it then it will as well (if it hasn't already) so he is a moneymaker after more money, why should I care? Please, I'm begging people to explain why his bullshot should be taken as anything more than anyone elses (mine included). Oh and to Famicomman, Lord of the RIngs was a book first not a movie, and it was written before the whole media industry became the master of dumbass, therefore any game or movie made from it would be good.

Omihalcon
Omihalcon

As an active movie-goer/gamer it really kills me to see how the worlds of gaming and cinema have seemingly (in general): 1. Hit the wall in terms of originality/creativity 2. Taken to producing low quality cash-ins of each other and then acting like they're advancing the industry It's not always the case and in terms of #2 there are some great examples of video game tie in's already mentioned. As for video game movies... not so much but its all relative ( I hell enjoy the R.E. movies and im a massive fan of the series) inevitably you have to disconnect you're opinion of the original game/movie to give the tie-in a fair chance; unfortunately, all pre-conceptions, aside most tie-ins manage to be mediocre by themselves. And yet without this seemingly souless industry we wouldn't have gems like 'House of the Dead' (movie), a 90 minute excuse to watch scantily clad teengers armed with automatic weapons run around a zombie infested island. Devoid of all quality but by god is it entertaining :D

Hydrolix
Hydrolix

The whole reason this is even happening is because Hollywood has run completely out of ideas. They are stretching and reaching as far as they can within the little box they have created for themselves. Think about it. When was the last time you saw a movie in the theater that wasn't a remake or a sequel? The created box is safety. They don't take risks any more and are looking for successful game franchises to exploit hoping it's a safe profitable bet. Somehow they have failed to notice that people aren't going to see the garbage they are creating. Box office sales are WAY down. The first post up top epitomizes to me why Hollywood (and many games) are turning to crap. They seem to think that they can just take an action game and throw a whole bunch of explosions up on the screen and call it a film. The best movies I have seen lately have had zero special effects. (Thank You for Smoking, Anatomy of a Murder, Broken Flowers) I want and I think most viewing audiences want something they can relate to. Interesting plots, engaging characters, quality acting, and envigorating, engrosing stories! (I just played the Prey demo and loved it...primarily because of all the story elements and the constant dialog from the protagonist). Halo for example has the potential to be a great movie. There is lots of story to be told there, plus the obligatory kick ass action sequences. However, in the wrong hands it has the potential to be absolute crap. My .02 basically is to say to Hollywood and game developers TAKE RISKS, FEEL FREE TO CREATE, BE AMBITIOUS, GIVE US SOMETHING NEW! AND GOOD!

WaterSerpent75
WaterSerpent75

I think that the filmmakers for the video game-based movies need to think, rethink, and take their time on making one. Every single vg-based film as of now has taken shorter than any normal movie (probably due to creativity), but if they took more time in their works, they might possible even make a good one once they do.

nodusfinitus
nodusfinitus

Did I just read what I think I read that the Resident Evil movies were "good?" NO, they were not. Just because Hollywood keeps financing W.S. Anderson to **** on that franchise doesn't mean he's actually getting something right outside of sales. He makes poor excuses to make other storylines his own. He doesn't just change the approach, but the stories themselves and plasters his name in large font to let you know it's HIS movie. The problem with game based movies is obvious - Hollywood goes by hype and game sales. People in general (movie goers) don't really care for 'stories', they want stimulation mainly via action & fear. That being the case, why the hell should Hollywood care about story if gamers mostly give a damn about action which is why Hollywood assumes we play games to begin with? Call it stereotyping if you want, but it doesn't take a highly perceptive observer to see that most American gamers are action fanatics that don't really give a damn about storylines. So who's really to blame?

firebreathing
firebreathing

I don't really like how the Silent Hill movie turned out. It seemed too short, didn't really have that Silent Hill feel to it. It seemed like I wasjust watching another horror movie. I bet it was worse for the people who hadn't even played the game before, confusion up the ass. I think the reson this movie wasn't really a big hit was because they stuck too close to the games. The movie had the Silent Hill plot (1st game), throw out harry and insert female protagonist, used a monsters from the game (pyrmaid head, the vomiting maniquin, the insects) The ones they made up didn't really even seem to instill fear in me :( Overall the move just didn't seem like Silent Hill. I walked away from the movie with an empty feeling in me. I was really expecting it to be good, considering who was directing the movie, but I guess not ;_;

Humorguy_basic
Humorguy_basic

Yet more proof that the slump in video game sales (console and PC) will continue. More proof that gaming will continue to get blander and blander.I am so glad I am old enough to have been playing games on the Commodore 64 and early PC's (late 80's/early 90's) that were so innovative, and when the hobby was so exciting and honest.(Could this be the reason for the huge huge growth in abandonware and retro gaming?) PC games sales are one third of what they were 10-12 years ago, and during the same time period production costs have gone through the ceiling and gaming has been replaced by technology and the 'it will work if you bought your PC this morning'.. Given the average gamer is much older now (more likely to be 25 than 5) there is a much higher risk of gamers finding 'other' interests. It is less likely they will be brainwashed into buying bad movie based games or bad games based movies through hype as younger, less mature gamers might have in the past.. Something that has to be borne in mind by all hardcore gamers, like the one's posting here, is that hardcore gamers only account for about 35% of sales. If the other 65% of gamers walk away from the video game hobby it won't matter how hardcore the 35% are, publishers will walk away as the market will not be big enough to support the huge production costs.

jsambeckwith
jsambeckwith

Some game movies could, potentially work, but not if the awful directors at hollywood get their hands on them. We need a good director, with imagination. *Cough* Tim Burton *Cough* Bryan Singer *Cough* Yeah, like those guys. X-men is a case example. It was good.

iamtherealship
iamtherealship

Well Hollywood can't take a crap video game franchise and turn it into a movie, yet on the other other hand hollywood shouldn't take a good franchise and expect a box office hit.

iscariot83
iscariot83

I think game based movies and vice versa can work. The trick seems to be knowing how to seperate the two...basically create a new story, set in the same universe that doesn't contradict the original, perhaps with one or two of the characters. It's when you try to essentially "port" a movie to a game that you get crap.

insinuendo
insinuendo

I just want to see an Ico movie . . . Or Shadow of the Colossus.

Yaridemus
Yaridemus

That "problem" that arises from "making a game into a major motion picture" is that "no one wants to see them unless they've played them." Seriously, the 500,000 people who buy and play a game are not going to equal 200,000,000 in box office profits. Hollywood is a cesspool of a cesspool of mutant idiots...like Ben Affleck.

040591
040591

if they want a great movie of a game, they dont have to mess the game history

animorph_235
animorph_235

they re right it all depends on the actual story of the game in the first place. Most FPS game movies are not going to be that big bcuz no one pays attention to the story in those anyway. we need adventure and puzzle games for movies its the only way they can let hollywood keep their dignity.

00Rambol00
00Rambol00

game movies are poo, its best that films and games shouldn't be too close to each other or disaster arrives lol e.g. RE films we're ruined, the game experiance for RE is much better.

00Rambol00
00Rambol00

game movies are poo, its best that films and games shouldn't be too close to each other or disaster arrives lol e.g. RE films we're ruined, the game experiance for RE is much better.

00Rambol00
00Rambol00

game movies are poo, its best that films and games shouldn't be too close to each other or disaster arrives lol e.g. RE films we're ruined, the game experiance for RE is much better.

00Rambol00
00Rambol00

i personally think that movie games are poo, its usually best that film and game market stay apart lol (unless you have the right principles) For e.g., the RE films were ruined in a way because the game experiance is so much better. Am a fan of most Franchises and i've played computer games for a long time.

Hellisunreal
Hellisunreal

"give greed a chance" ..... LOL thats what all this Sh*t is bout.

CyphenX
CyphenX

About 22 hours ago, I posted a fairly lengthy comment on this news article concerning my views on the workings of movies and games. Now there's a lot of comments and hardly any of them get read, so when the users "saugh" and "Joriath" actually gave me positive comments on my post, I was surprised. FIrst of all I'd like to say thank you to these two fine fellows. Thanks guys! And secondly, by pure, unpremeditated coincidence, this happens to be a great marketing opportunity. If you are interested in the aforementioned post, it was posted on June 30, 2006, at 1:16 a.m. Pacific Time. Each comment has its post time information at the bottom, so you may use this information to sift through everything to fine my comment. It also happens to be the longest comment here, so that should help. Enjoy!

CyphenX
CyphenX

[This message was deleted at the request of the original poster]

Surllio
Surllio

Dispite popular belief, the film industry is in a lot better shape than a lot of people claim. Hollywood actually doesn't think its dismal, a lot of that is theatres and media making up things to try to promote more movie goers to go to theatres, and the theatres are throwing more and more comercials at us, which of course, makes us all go away. Video game moves are hard to do. Paul Anderson said it best. You can't do it exact, and you can't do it completely original. There is just no pleasing nerds. This includes comic book movies. Most of the complaints come from the nerds. "They didn't follow the comic" or "they followed the comic too closely" is the general two comments. The same can be said about video game movies. There is no pleasing some people. I agree with his statement that the RPG venue is the place to go. But again, you run into the same problem. While the games will make wonderful cinematic ventures, you still have the exact same issue, you have to find the right mix. Saddly, nothing has done this yet. The closest would be Silent Hill, and even it didn't get the mix completely right. They one day will get it right, but until then, we can just keep our fingers crossed.

neoteny
neoteny

Arite! Blade the series! they should make a video game out of this fine piece of work...and im sure someone has the idea already set in motion. no wait....they already tried that. nevermind. or are they? BOTTOM OF THE BARREL PEOPLE...BOTTOM OF THE BARREL. did you know they're makin a splinter cell movie?! hollywood's killing me. all of us actually from what im reading here. they're some brave writers out there. AND THEY SUCK AT IT. Halo movie? now thats gonna crash and burn. UNLESS... someone who knows what being a gamer is about and take that thought into mind and keep the story original. I heard Peter Jackson's makin a stab at Halo. it's inevitable. all the good writers are gone! GONE! that being said they should STOP! STOP! before hollywood dies without honor.

PenguinIzzy
PenguinIzzy

[This message was deleted at the request of the original poster]

PenguinIzzy
PenguinIzzy

Common Misconceptions Cleared Up. 1. The movie industry is not tanking. Even if DVD Sales/Rentals numbers decline (which is not the case, the numbers are healthy), a majority of the industry's revenue is derived from Worldwide Box Office Ticket Sales. The movie industry is fine with such a string of blockbuster hits, just look at the gross revenues of all the comic-book films within the last decade. 2. Commercial tie-ins between Films and ancillary products (books, games, movie soundtracks, etc.) have been around since "Jaws" introduced them to the economic market. They are naturally throw-away products with little-to-no value outside of being related to the movie. That is why it is not surprising that Games-to-Movies tie-ins are crappy products: they naturally serve no purpose other than to exploit the hype surrounding a film. Furthermore, since movies are inherently secretive about their plot, game designers are actually only given time to create a video game from Post-Production to Release. That usually means four months, which is a very short time to create a legitimate full-fledged game.

MangyForestCat
MangyForestCat

Wow with an entertainment genre of such prestige and background such as movies have, it is sad to see that they are reaching out to video games as their last hope before the entire movie industry goes under. As I hope all of you know that there are less and less moviegoers each year and less and less DVDs being sold, and less money going into the movie industry. At this point it has basically plateaued and it's only a matter of time till it goes down. At the same time though you see exponential increases in all sales of video game entertainment. Year after year the video game industry grows larger and larger now beating all other forms of entertainment, books, tv, cable tv, movies, dvd sales. EVERYTHING! I can only feel sad that this seems to be a very sloppy very horrible attempt at trying to not go under for Hollywood. I do not wish for movies and videogames to mix, ever. I wish that they would stay far away from each other because the outcome of them mixing only produces the most horrible piece of crap in this world. I would also wish that video games would stop immitating movies so much, with a entertainment platform such as video games are with so much variety and ability to produce and make anything possible they have to immitate movies this much? I'll give an example.... before Saving Private Ryan what was the most exciting WWII game you saw? you can't say Wolfenstein cause that was sloppy and alone in it's genre.... Saving Private Ryan = a billion kajillion WWII games for a billion kajillion years that even up until this point we haven't gotten out of that stupid phase! I mean CoD2 came out only last November! If I could erase any one movie out of history it would be Saving Private Ryan god! that movie must die! and the WWII video games should too!

John_of_Fire
John_of_Fire

Part of the problem is you have to make a product that can stand on its own and alongside its source. Most of the movies don't stand up as movies and really look bad when compared to their counterparts. Most movie to game products are usually kids games made to make money off the hype of the movie and usually are forgettable games. Goldeneye- great. Riddick- great. Why? Because they were good movies and good games that worked well in the same world. You have to make the product to be able to stand on its own two legs without its counterpart, meanwhile confining it self to boundaries of the the world it is in. In other words: don't contradict your film/game counterpart. It detracts from the world you are trying to create and takes people out of the experience.

SolarisDeschain
SolarisDeschain

"dark link that is the funniest thing i have ever heard! Nintendo is doing really bad dude lol they lost a lot of money with the gamecube" You keep on believing that, dude.

rokkuman09
rokkuman09

dark link that is the funniest thing i have ever heard! Nintendo is doing really bad dude lol they lost a lot of money with the gamecube

anyulled
anyulled

good to hear this notice....

shamarke
shamarke

sorry for sending to comments my bad (damn computer).

shamarke
shamarke

games for real sucks.......but on CG like final fantasy advent children is cool!!!!!

Dark_Link87
Dark_Link87

i hear rumors that nintendo is gonne turn into a film industry i dont so how that can happen nintendo is doing well with their games

shamarke
shamarke

game movies in CG grafik is good exempal final fantasy 7 advent children like Doom the movie it was real acters the Rock!!!!!

natethegreat235
natethegreat235

The Doom movie was a joke.... Just thought I'd add that....

blackwing837
blackwing837

Case in point- Sega's House of The Dead... the worst movie ever made.

GameDestroyer88
GameDestroyer88

Hmmm. Well I'm all about making games and movies totally different from one another, but the things I've been reading on this board are even more interesting. It is very true that movies of games suck very much.....and that goes double for games that turn into movies. However...the solution is not to completely seperate the two....but to have them harmoniously working together. Now, the idea to make RPG's into movies = bad idea....I don't know about anyone else here but I don't want Suikoden turning into a movie....hell even Oblivion turning into a movie would be a bad idea. Why? because as games, they have long playing times. I mean how would you stick Oblivion's 100+ hours of gaming into a 2 and half hour movie. The only exception I would make for the RPG genre, are the Knights of the Old Republic games....Star Wars which is an already gigantic franchise and 6 movies, I don't see why KOTOR can't become a great movie. And yes I am a big Star Wars nut lol. However when it comes to a game like KH2 it can't be done. The games are too long to be movies. If handled in an intelligent way a game like Gun....can become a great movie. Genji can become a great movie.....but only if they are handled in a way that would stay faithful to the games. You can't make the movies totally different from the games....like Resident Evil.....what happened to the movies?? who the hell is alice?? You see thats what I'm talking about.....you cannot mess up the storyline when it comes to making a movie out of a game. Oh and don't get me started on movies made into games....EA is solely responsible for making half of the crap ass movie games out there.