GDC 2009: Kojima on forging Metal Gear, teases 'Next MGS'

[UPDATE] Konami's star developer recaps two decades of development on signature stealth franchise in keynote address; ends by saying series will continue; full blog transcript and video inside.

Coming Soon: Ancient Snake

SAN FRANCISCO--Last night, Metal Gear creator Hideo Kojima was the toast of the industry, recognized with a Lifetime Achievement Award at the Game Developers Choice Awards. He was the focus of attention once more today when he delivered the keynote address in the "Vision" track at the 2009 Game Developers Conference.

Having pioneered the stealth action genre with the original Metal Gear--then reinvented it with Metal Gear Solid, and most recently Metal Gear Solid 4--Kojima will talk about clearing game-design hurdles with creativity. Fittingly enough, the famed designer promises to put exclamation points on his lessons with specific examples from his two full decades of developing Metal Gear games.

[10:20] Attendees are now swarming into the Moscone Center's south hall. In a topsy-turvy twist to the norm, the only people being made to wait in line at the door are members of the press. Their patience is rewarded, though, as a Konami rep is systematically escorting them to a group of seats front and center for the show.

[10:24] A voice comes over the PA telling the crowd to turn off their mobile devices and refrain from flash photography. The program is set to begin shortly.

[10:25] The usual preshow gaggle of shutterbugs and wandering rubberneckers looking for friends in the crowd is starting to thin out as people take their seats.

[10:27] Either a good chunk of the press is still recovering from last night's Game Developers Choice Awards, or Konami set aside a few too many seats for the media. There's an embarrassing amount of elbow room up front considering how tightly packed the rest of the audience is.

[10:30] Did they just turn the house music up louder? It seems like the din of the audience is keeping pace, though.

[10:30] There goes the house music, and the voice introduces GDC event director Meggan Scavio.

[10:31] Scavio takes the stage to applause and brings up the GDC Awards. She mentions Kojima winning a lifetime-achievement award at the show, and dives into his introduction.

[10:32] She says this is one of the first keynote addresses Kojima has ever given outside Japan, and introduces him to thunderous applause. KNEEL BEFORE YOUR GOD.

[10:32] Speaking through a translator, Kojima thanks everyone for attending the morning keynote and for the lifetime-achievement award.

[10:33] He's been in the industry for 20 years now, but this is his first time at GDC. In previous years, he was always busy preparing for E3 in May.

[10:34] There's also the fact that E3 has "lost its punch" over the years, and it helped that organizers called him and said they'd give him an award if he came, too.

[10:35] Kojima prefaces his speech, saying it will be a more philosophical than technical discussion of design. He also cautions that it will be a long presentation, and hopes he won't bore people. Small chance of that, with the audience hanging on every word.

[10:36] And lest anyone who attended yesterday's Nintendo keynote have any misconceptions, Kojima will not be giving out any free games. Laughter all around.

[10:36] He notes that there are no other sessions going on right now, so everybody is stuck in this keynote no matter how boring it is. More chuckles.

[10:37] Kojima talks about "revolutionary creation," something that nobody has ever done before. In other words, it's making the impossible possible.

[10:38] He shows a slide of a line, calling it a path, like a person's life or a game. Snake runs across the path, just going through his everyday life.

[10:38] But usually there are obstacles on a path. A box pops up on the path, and Snake hurdles it easily. Then Mario comes out and jumps over it. Many obstacles are simple to clear. But if the wall becomes taller (cue animation), the obstacles are more serious.

[10:40] Snake can't jump the taller obstacle, which makes the old soldier sad. Mario can jump, so he can clear the obstacle. That sets Snake to thinking as Kojima explains the difference between possible (things done before) and impossible (things not done before).

[10:42] Kojima said impossible is just an assumption made because something hasn't been done before. Snake can't jump over the wall, but maybe he could pole-vault over it. Or demolish it with weapons. Or fly over it with a balloon. Or use another box to climb over it. Or use a Looney Tunes portal to get to the other side.

[10:43] If you change the view, he says, you can see that the wall is easy to walk around also. Or maybe Snake could dig underneath it.

[10:44] Kojima then moves to talk about the barriers of impossibility that he runs into when designing games. He uses the same wall metaphor, with the height of the floor representing the level of technology in game hardware. The higher that is, the easier it is to go over the wall.

[10:45] Software technology acts like a box for Snake to stand on, but he's still not quite high enough to get over the wall. For that, he needs a ladder that Kojima calls creative game design (such as the balloon and pole-vault solutions).

[10:45] With that metaphor thoroughly strip-mined, Kojima looks back to the first Metal Gear on the MSX2 in 1985."It was quite popular back then," Kojima said of the Japanese system.

[10:47] "There was a phenomenon of Rambo," Kojima said. "First Blood Part 2 was a big hit, and combat games were big back then."

[10:48] Explaining what a combat game was in 1986, Kojima said it was 2D, and it needed a background, a player, and bunch of enemies. It also needed bullets to shoot the enemies.

[10:49] Designers also had to take account of the hardware available at the time. He shows a sample screen of Nemesis (a Gradius game) released on the MSX1 in 1986.

Nemesis' title screen.

[10:52] The game had a background of variety of sprites on top of it. The problem was that there was a limit of 32 sprites that could be displayed at any time. Also, if you displayed eight sprites horizontally, the ninth sprite would not display properly.

[10:53] He showed a clip of Nemesis, which suffered from horrible flickering of enemy sprites. He then showed the clip again in slow motion.

[10:53] "This was the actual product," Kojima said. "It's not a bug."

[10:53] The creative workaround at the time was to have the game cycle through which sprite it would drop out at any given moment, so there wasn't any one enemy that was permanently invisible to the player.

[10:53] Now he shows an example of an action game such as Metal Gear with three characters. With each character made of two sprites, that meant that Kojima could put Snake and two enemies onscreen, and have sprites remaining for no more than two bullets at a time.

[10:54] Kojima thought it was Mission: Impossible to do a traditional combat game on the system with that limitation, so he came up with a few other ideas. He thought up a combat game without fighting, which didn't work at all.

[10:55] Then he thought about a combat game about escaping, but ditched the idea because that was "totally uncool."

[10:55] Now a game about hiding, in which the player runs around and then sneaks away from enemies--Kojima thought that could work. But it wasn't really "heroic," so he needed another idea.

[10:56] Then he determined to make it an infiltration game, wherein the hiding and running around was used for an aggressive (and cooler) end. Thus, the stealth game was born.

Michael Biehn was originally cast as Solid Snake.

[10:57] As a result, Kojima wound up changing the mission from creating a combat game to creating a stealth game.

[10:59] Kojima shows a mock-up of a scene from Metal Gear, in which enemies would patrol a corridor and players would have to sneak by when the foes weren't looking. Considering that the system couldn't handle scrolling, Kojima said it wound up more like a puzzle game in which players had to go through one screen at a time, with each providing its own puzzle to solve.

[11:00] He laments that the original MSX Metal Gear was never released in America.

[11:00] "You might know the original NES Metal Gear, but that's a crap game because I didn't participate in it."

[11:02] Kojima showed a bit of original Metal Gear gameplay, and mentions the game design "ladder" that helped him achieve his mission. The infiltration concept was a big part of it, but enemies with a range of sight who acted differently once they spotted Snake helped as well. He even pointed out the now-iconic exclamation point that conveyed a guard's alert state.

[11:03] The next mission was to create a deeper stealth game. Given that hardware technology hadn't risen at all, he had to use the MSX again; it was only the obstacle in front of him that had grown taller.

Pushing the MSX2's limits.

[11:07] For Metal Gear 2: Solid Snake, Kojima made guards' vision a wider cone instead of a straight line to make things a bit tougher. He also thought the one-screen-at-a-time puzzle mechanic was a bit boring, so he added a radar readout to the screen. That let players keep track of other enemies on different screens, and allowed for more difficult levels.

[11:07] After a brief technical delay, Kojima talks about adding the "evasion" phase into the game. After an enemy loses sight of Snake, the enemies will wander around looking for him, forcing players to hide and also be still. Kojima added "hearing" to the enemies in Solid Snake, so players had to be careful that their noisy actions wouldn't give them away.

[11:07] He mentions the Solid Snake game released in America, and says it was "a little crap game" because he wasn't involved in that one, either.

[11:09] The game-design ladder for the real Solid Snake was the concept of infiltration into an area, not just one screen. Adding vision and hearing to the enemies, a radar for the player, and three different states of alertness to the enemy AI also added to the game enough for Kojima to look at it as another mission accomplished.

[11:10] The next mission was to create a 3D stealth game for the MSX2, which draws some chuckles from the audience.

[11:11] This time the wall Snake comes to is a lot higher. "Probably it's quite impossible, isn't it," Kojima jokes.

[11:13] That one really was impossible, Kojima said, but four years later (1994), the PlayStation came out in Japan.

[11:13] The new hardware elevated the floor, making the wall of creating a 3D stealth game much smaller. All he had to do was change the mission to creating a 3D stealth game for the original PlayStation.

[11:15] Kojima mentions Metal Gear Solid by name and the audience applauds enthusiastically. He shows another mockup, pointing out that Snake can be cornered by enemies but would now be able to hide in a duct and look out from a first-person view to see if the coast was clear.

[11:16] Metal Gear Solid came out in September 1998 in Japan, the next month in the US, and the following February in Europe. That delay was because Kojima wanted to record the game's voice-overs in six different languages for the European market.

[11:17] Kojima takes the crowd through the in-game voices in all six languages. After the German one draws a few laughs, Kojima says, "It sounds like, 'I want to eat some sausages.'"

[11:17] The Italian version sounds to Kojima like "I want to eat some pasta."

[11:17] After an "impassioned" Spanish version, Kojima plays the "romantic" French version.

How do you say "!" in French?

[11:19] Kojima shows a clip of Metal Gear Solid and its numerous innovations. There were in-game cutscenes, camera-angle changes when Snake pressed up against the wall, the first-person binocular view, the restricted view that players deal with when sneaking through ducts, and other little touches.

[11:21] The concept "ladder" for MGS was infiltration in a 3D world. The dynamic changes in perspective and cutscenes with voice-overs were other key aspects of the game that Kojima said helped result in a completed mission.

[11:21] Time for a break. Kojima shows a Japanese Metal Gear Solid commercial with two women in different-colored dresses talking about hide and seek.

[11:21] Metal Gear Solid was a hit, so a sequel was a natural. This time the mission was to make a realistic-looking stealth game. The wall of impossibility is higher than ever before, Kojima said.

[11:22] And then, in 2000, Sony released the PlayStation 2...

Snake hides out in Metal Gear Solid 2: Sons of Liberty.

[11:24] The PS2 raised the floor in terms of hardware power, but not as high as Kojima had expected. He decided that going after "realistic looking" wasn't doable because there were still technical hurdles, so he changed the mission to making "an immersive stealth game."

[11:26] Kojima mentions Metal Gear Solid 2: Sons of Liberty by name, which curiously doesn't get any applause. He shows a mockup of the game, in which atmospheric elements such as lighting and weather actually played into the gameplay.

[11:26] He shows a clip of the MGS2 opening cinematic. It was 60fps and the development team did motion capture for the first time, "so that was why we had some pretty long cutscenes, which some of you didn't like."

[11:26] "You were supposed to laugh there."

[11:27] Kojima mentioned touches such as the lockers that could be used by Snake to hide himself or to hide unconscious enemies. Location-specific damage on enemies, shooting from a first-person view, and other "gimmicks" helped establish the design ladder that made the mission possible.

[11:29] Another mission complete for Kojima, so it's time to watch a Japanese commercial for MGS2.

[11:29] The commercial shows a pudgy, balding businessman hiding from his employees, Mega64-style, by using Snake's assortment of techniques, which drew large laughs from the audience.

[11:31] Time for another sequel. The mission this time was to create a stealth game that surpassed the previous one on the same platform, the PS2.

[11:31] With no new hardware, the team had to advance using nothing but software technology and game design. Kojima shows a grid with two axes: one runs from open to closed, the other from natural to artificial.

[11:32] Previous Metal Gear Solid games had been always in artificial environments, and usually closed ones at that.

[11:32] But no Metal Gear game had been made in a natural, open environment. That made new design challenges and dictated a number of changes.

[11:34] Kojima's team rebuilt its 3D engine to be able to handle the natural environments, so the mission was tweaked again. This time it was to create a stealth game that surpasses the previous one using a new engine. That brings us to Metal Gear Solid 3: Snake Eater.

Snake spends some quality time with a friend in Metal Gear Solid 3: Snake Eater.

[11:35] This time the mockup shows Snake taking advantage of the natural setting with a new camouflage mechanic and a survival element to let players heal themselves through the environment.

[11:36] "Everyone said the cutscenes were too long in MGS2, so I made them a little shorter in MGS 3 and struck a good balance, I thought."

[11:37] "You're supposed to laugh here, guys. I'm talking about my cutscenes."

[11:37] The design ladder for Snake Eater was the combination of camouflage, food capture, a stamina gauge, and a cure system.

[11:39] Now it's time for a "special" long version of the Japanese MGS3 commercial. This time it's a businessman crawling through the jungle with an umbrella, wading through waters holding it high like a rifle, clubbing a snake to death and grilling it up, and hiding as an alligator.

[11:39] The commercial ends with the man in camouflage face paint, peeping at a woman bathing in a jungle pond.

[11:39] Although Kojima said he wanted the series to be concluded, demands for a sequel "could not be ignored."

[11:40] "That's when I came up with a plan. If I make the ultimate stealth game, I won't have to make any more."

[11:40] Now it's 2005, and Kojima said he was hearing about a new superpowerful machine that could do anything. You wouldn't even need a design ladder because the system was so powerful.

[11:43] "I don't want you to take me the wrong way," Kojima said. "It was just a rumor I had heard. But as a creator, I had limitless ideas."

[11:43] Kojima said the PS3 wound up being a great machine, but its power was not unbounded.

[11:43] That called for another mission change, this time to using the actual power of the PS3 to create a new infiltration experience. That resulted in Metal Gear Solid 4: Guns of the Patriots.

Did you know Metal Gear Solid 4 was almost subtitled "Plaid Snake"? True story.

[11:45] The mock-up Kojima shows has Snake in the middle of a battle, picking off troops from both sides. He then replays the scenario with Snake allying himself with whichever side is winning.

[11:45] "In a war zone, the environment is always changing, so I added an element where the user could select what to do."

[11:45] He shows a clip. "It's a monster machine, so the cutscenes are monstrous as well."

[11:46] That draws chuckles, but not enough for Kojima's liking. "You're supposed to laugh even more! Come on, I'm talking about my cutscenes!" Ah, the shame-them-into-laughter technique. Not so effective.

[11:48] The game-design ladder that helped accomplish this mission was the concept of infiltration into an existing situation such as a war zone. Kojima was also proud of the dynamic battlefield-alliances mechanic, as well as Old Snake's octo-camo suit.

[11:48] Time for a Japanese MGS4 commercial, in which a player is so engrossed in the game he chooses it over his daily life, phone calls, and even a marriage proposal.

[11:49] Kojima recaps the three elements that help designers clear impossible obstacles: the hardware, software technology, and game design.

[11:51] "If I had given up [on that first mission], there wouldn't be any Metal Gear series," Kojima said. "There wouldn't be any Splinter Cell series either, I guess..."

[11:52] Kojima talks about his designer-driven game design as a throwback to those who had to deal with hardware limitations of the past. He says Japanese designers tend to have that approach, but there's a new trend that he says is popular right now, an approach more reliant on software technology.

[11:55] In the future, Kojima said he wants to use both approaches to climb the impossible wall, and shows Snake climbing the wall to "The Next MGS." Then, snake is replaced by a small figure which appears to be the sword-toting Raiden--possibly a hint of things to come.

[11:59] "I want to challenge this wall of impossibility with everyone out there in the audience today," Kojima said. He invites people geared toward that dual-design approach to visit Kojima Productions' GDC booth and perhaps join the team.

[11:59] Kojima recaps a few key themes, such as turning yesterday's impossible into today's possible by overcoming those barriers.

[11:59] "90 percent of what is considered impossible is in fact possible," Kojima said. "The other 10 percent will become possible with the passage of time and technology."

[11:59] Kojima encourages the crowd one last time to make the impossible possible, and ends his presentation as the crowd delivers hearty applause.

Written By

Want the latest news about Metal Gear Solid?

Metal Gear Solid

Metal Gear Solid

Follow

Discussion

416 comments
electr0boi
electr0boi

I have to say, watching his GDC presentation has just made me renew my respect for him and the entire Metal Gear series. I'm already looking forward to the new one, I KNOW it's going to be great. =]

brunorr
brunorr

the ads before all videos.... cmon

vengeance00
vengeance00

i don't mind kojima's cut scenes, people who don't like long cutscenes don't like stories.

MajinDante
MajinDante

lawman80, if mgs4 is a prequel to 2 why is snake older in 4? nevermind that. how would he have a flashback to 2 if 4 as you say was a prequel.

HellishDude
HellishDude

To lawman80 MGS4 was not a prequel from MGS2. MGS4 was a sequel from MGS2. MGS1 -> MGS2 -> MGS4. Most propably the new MGS can be either after MGS4(due to the raiden picture) and Solid Snake took Big Boss's place, or it can be after MGS3 and we finally get to see how Big Boss has become the villain he was set out to be. For my understand I think Kojima is trying to create 2 story arcs, One arc being Solid Snake's and the other be the Big Boss arc.

lawman80
lawman80

I can't wait for Kojima's next production!!! I'm still waiting for the countdown to end on the official site, so we'll get to know what it is.... it has a pic of Big Boss!!!! Hopefully it is a prequel to MGS3, like MGS4 was a prequel to MGS2..... but there was a prequel released on the PSP, MGS Ops. Hopefully this continues the story from that and ends just before Metal Gear 1... I think this is more probable since now everyone knows who Big Boss is, and that Snake is a clone of him.... I think Kojima is now ready to tell the story of Big Boss!!!!!! * I remember playing MGS3 I actually thought I was playing Solid Snake, but in fact, was Big Boss......

QjB3910
QjB3910

i love how the last video just completely cuts off at the climax. besides the japanese i mean, but i dont speak the language.

Lotusofkonoha
Lotusofkonoha

Everyone notice at the end of the presentation that the figure standing at the "ultimate stealth game" is Raiden

KaosKetchup
KaosKetchup

oops sorry for dbl post, kept giving me the 404 error

KaosKetchup
KaosKetchup

@Malco_Vincenzo Dude, i really hate to say it, but i've played countless hours of both mgs and splinter cell and can tell you the only thing that could've been taken from splinter cell is the way that snake walks while crouched, other than that, he is always crouching with one knee down, unlike fishers sprawled eagle squat. i'm not trying to be a d-bag, it just doesn't seem right to let this slide. Though i can see how you can compare how the guns are held, i have always thought that splinter cell had always copied this stance from mgs 1. The over the shoulder thing, while you see it in splinter cell, is actually much less a copy of style as it is kojima's way of making the game more western friendly. You know what'd be cool though is if they released some dlc that allowed you to play through some of the areas with the mgs1 camera style. Still, not trying to get on your nerves, just pointing this out.

KaosKetchup
KaosKetchup

@Malco_Vincenzo Dude, i really hate to say it, but i've played countless hours of both mgs and splinter cell and can tell you the only thing that could've been taken from splinter cell is the way that snake walks while crouched, other than that, he is always crouching with one knee down, unlike fishers sprawled eagle squat. i'm not trying to be a d-bag, it just doesn't seem right to let this slide. Though i can see how you can compare how the guns are held, i have always thought that splinter cell had always copied this stance from mgs 1. The over the shoulder thing, while you see it in splinter cell, is actually much less a copy of style as it is kojima's way of making the game more western friendly. You know what'd be cool though is if they released some dlc that allowed you to play through some of the areas with the mgs1 camera style. Still, not trying to get on your nerves, just pointing this out.

Malco_Vincenzo
Malco_Vincenzo

@ VirtuaCast "Malco_Vincenzo wrote: you thought that splinter cell came out before MGS?! how could you even pretend to be that ignorant? the Metal Gear series has been going on since '88. LOL FAIL! OMG lol no, learn to read I said gameplay mechanics. And they did, copy off of Splintercell controls every one knows it even the Devs do. And when Konmi adopt Ubi controls the became better and scored a 10s." ??? have you even played MGS 4? the controls are comepletly different. where do you get this idea that konami copied spinter cell in any way? KONAMI's MG SERIES WAS THE FIRST SNEAKING GAME EVER. if it were'nt for konami you wouldn't have two of ubisofts big franchises, Assasin's Creed and Splinter Cell. Why do you think you can unlock Altiar's clothing in MGS4. that's ubisoft showing it's respect. ther gameplay is different in splinter cell. you could interrogate people in MGS2 a full year before you could in the first splinter cell. and where are splinter cell's unique and epic boss fights? learn your stuff man. once again FAIL.

shii666
shii666

Personally, on the idea of multiple platforms, I don't think Kojima will turn the Xbox 360 (or whatever would be out) down completely, just because he now knows how to use the ps3. If he does plan multiconsole development, judging by his speech, he will see how far the other systems will come before he just turns one down. (you don't need to read this next bit) I wouldn't be surprised if the next MG came only to the ps3, (or whatever system of whatever generation) because, he knows how to use the ps3 already. But it is good to keep an open mind, he still tried to test what the original Xbox would do. And before people get mad at me for supporting a console I do not have, (fanboys, any one who marks me down for slightly supporting the 360) I am indeed a ps3 FANBOY (I can't stand Microsoft, which is ironic considering I am on a windows computer) and I do indeed believe that the ps3 is capable of more than the 360.

Xiosis
Xiosis

lol snake didnt fall that far ;-)

ayhokkuu
ayhokkuu

they need to make a game for foxhound I mean, most of the story is based off of foxhound but we don't even get to see it? It confuses me. I personally think that there next game should have a side roll of shooter. I know that all the other MGS games had guns and all that, but even in MGS4 if you shot somebody you were screwed. If they go for a more shooter style game, I personally think it would be... better. I'm not saying that the stealth genre was a bad idea or anything, or they should stop all progress of it, I just think it would be a nice fusion. And of course, in the last video u see that he wants to use more system technology than game design. That's where he went wrong. Yes, system technology can make all the difference in the world, but game design is even more important. MGS4 got a 10/10. Games that used system technology like battlefield: bad company got a 8.5/10, assassins creed got a 9/10 and so on. game design is more important period. but lets say you give games like bf: bc and ac better game design. they'd be breaking records. likewise for MGS. if they add better system technology, then they'd damn sure keep there records.

Newager
Newager

actually i think this time the limitation is not the technology anymore but the character. So he put the raiden character symbol there. The technology is advanced enough and available for further expansion, game design is superb what they need to evolve is to stop using a person who does not jump so much does not do acrobatic movement so much. That would open up a whole new possibilities, walking on rails, assassins creed style? stalking from high buildings and relies not only on guns but also on the same time showing off that very important japanese bravery identity, the katana. He is indeed a genius... lets see where splinter cell progress from here on shall we? maybe more stuff abt dualistic side, working for side a and b like the last one or blend amongst the crowd like assasin's creed. I start to get a feeling metal gear series progress far too fast compared to splinter cell now after watching those videos.

tye16
tye16

I would love a remake of the shadow mosses incident.

duhhhhhh
duhhhhhh

one of my favorite game dev's and 1 of my favorite game series long live KOJIMA!

nerd_assassin
nerd_assassin

@Virtuacast Yeah, MGS came out years before Splinter Cell, and the original Metal Gear was way way before it, coming on MSX machines. Tsktsk...try to research your facts man. BTW, Splinter Cell was Tom Clancy's, so don't make Ubisoft have all the credit(with the story, that is). However, MGS is all Kojima's...haha. @ Max1363 He's not talking like a god, he just gave a speech for crying out loud. And FYI, he has a couple of good franchises under his name too, so don't go yapping around saying MGS is good, because unlike other developers that only has one franchise to be proud of, he has many, and they are really good. It's like saying a chef can only create 6 different steaks given he has a whole cow, that whole "MGS and Kojima" thing. CliffyB a game dev god? You could have put Shigeru Miyamoto there at the very least. But there's no game dev god, they're all just creating games for all of us, maybe I will too at some time. There are great ones, but just the same, they want to deliver games that people want to play. But you sure do made yourself sound like an xbot there. CliffyB...tsktsk.

bxbru05
bxbru05

MGS2!!! but i would awesome to play as the ninja or raiden

Echo13791
Echo13791

Very cool. Long live Metal Gear

Daniel72296
Daniel72296

@joelgargan Well, they already have for the PSP. It's called Portable Ops and it's about this group trying to find where all the pieces to the Philosophers' Legacy is. It takes place right after Snake Eater. It's a great game, but they just went all out of their way and made so many new characters. All of the bad guys are new ones except for Ocelot (but he's only in a cutscene at the end of the game). I was also kidding about Raiden's Fatherhood, lol.

hassy94
hassy94

Knowing Kojima (well not really, but), he'll create the new Metal Gear Solid as the whole saga, played from another characters perspective, and probably just call it Metal Gear Solid. It would be like a 60 hour game but what do you expect from Kojima?

joelgargan
joelgargan

@Daniel72296 Damn good idea. I'm still hanging out for a Snake Eater 2, a prologue or something./

Daniel72296
Daniel72296

MGS4 was the absolute best, but this one will be better: MGS5: Raiden's Fatherhood

tictac_doh
tictac_doh

MGS is the BEST Hideo Kojima is the best game desinger!

CapedCod
CapedCod

MGS lost me after the second one. I couldn't even finish "Snake Eater". Not that it wasn't a good game; I loved the new features and graphics, I just couldn't stand that he was rehashing MGS once again.

Pickles23
Pickles23

He is right about the new type of game development, which is Tech based Game Development and these are games that are in my opinion un-original and don't seem to have a higher level of quality as games that are made with the Designer Driven game Development. Games like this are Crysis and Tom Clancy's End War which are good games don't get me wrong but they seem Unoriginal and the only thing that is making them good games is their technology. Kojima's Designer Driven game design is a type of development in which it tries to Revolutionize the Genre the game is placed in. For Example Resident Evil 4 recreated the way we play shooters now with its Over the Shoulder 3rd person view Camera Style, now notice there are not many 3rd person shooters without this. Another Example is Gears of War's simple Cover system. My point now is I'm noticing more and more games today being developed with this Technology Based Game design and dwindling number of Designer Driven Game Design and I hope that this does not continue.

solidus2_1
solidus2_1

Doesn't really matter anymore really It wont be solid snake as the main character anyway not unless MGS5 takes place immediatly after or before 4 because snake had less than a year left to live. But they could always have a new snake I mean after all why couldn't they clone Big Boss again? Or it will be raidens game, or maybe Johny Akiba's........

Hoski0999
Hoski0999

i could care less if it came out for both systems or just one, i just want my metal gear, i'm not in it for the systems i'm in it for the games, and i've been with metal gear since the very beggining and i never wanna see it end!

emkplayboy6
emkplayboy6

SalarianChemist, you're a freaken tool! If hideo thought that then he woulda gone to the sh.itbox 360 a long time ago but obviously he hasn't so obviously he doens't want to! "xbox? Foka Xbox!"

kingcrowner
kingcrowner

the next mgs doesn't exactly mean a sequel right? it could be like starting a new game franchise that could be as successful as MGS or something

tye16
tye16

The MGS story has a huge history, just look in the MGS encyclopedia, it wouldn't surprise me if MGS5 is a prologue.

Furnish
Furnish

Hideo Kojima is one of my two heroes in the gaming industry and not to mention that the other hero is Solid Snake.

StealthKnife
StealthKnife

he has made every game great the next one will probably be great as well but i will miss solid snake if raidian the only one in it

SalarianChemist
SalarianChemist

Xbox 360 and Xbox Live would give Metal Gear new resources to take advantage of in terms of creating new gaming features. The question is, does Kojima have what it takes.

kytomasi
kytomasi

i think they should end MGS where its at and just make an jungle survival game, snake eater was amazing. They wrapped up MGS's story perfectly anything else mite feel like an add-on. Tho i would love to see how Raiden saved sunny.

ElmorePOW
ElmorePOW

Bring on the MGS! I would take Raiden as hero any time, or even some of the old geezers, like Grey Fox. I hope some of the new directors could take the job and would let Kojima to do something incredible like Snatcher and Policenauts - or even that humour game. Offcourse gaming-god would be overseeing the things. I personally loved also Ghost Babel, Acid-games and Portable ops.

CharlieFubar
CharlieFubar

i agree with chemwizard. Also look out for Halo 4, Mario Party 287, and Gears Of Shotgun 9... O h yeah, and Rachet and Clank: Depends on our Depends.

Neomaniac15
Neomaniac15

The anouncement neither surprises me nor does it create any negative feelings (quite the opposite actually.) i knew Snake wasn't dead yet. bring it on.

TSNAKE617
TSNAKE617

@ Everyone that's complaining about the next MGS. You don't have to buy it...

chemwizard
chemwizard

Big surprise here. Studio/developer makes hit game. Said studio/developer makes another hit game. Series continues ad nauseum regardless of promises of "final" games in series. I like Metal Gear as much as the next person, owning all of the games in the series with the exception of the most recent, MGS4, and I think Kojima has earned his accolades. But I despise companies that take a good series' story and bloat it all out to nonsensical hell just to be able to make more games. Not that it necassarily makes the resultant game(s) bad, but I don't often care if the story is retardedly stupid. I think I reached that point during MGS2 when I saw how Ocelot was being periodically controlled by Liquid Snake's arm. Thats not a plot point. Thats crap writing.

Superdude475
Superdude475

I thought there wasn't going to be any more Metal Gear Solids, but, a new Metal Gear game.

ninja_where
ninja_where

The new main for the new MGS could probably be Raiden's son. Or something...ah, who knows. I'm up for another MGS anytime, anywhere. Kojima is the man. I mean, he's come a long way. He's pretty darn awesome. What a man!

Ghost_Ryda1
Ghost_Ryda1

I dont know I would enjoy another MGS game but im kind of happy with the way things turned out in mgs4 because it kind of kept me in a state of wondering and relief and I think mgs5 would be over doing it unless they show the adventures of Big Boss during 2006-2014 if I am correct That would be what he was doing during MGS1,MGS2, and MGS4 as we were busy looking at Solid Snakes story