EverQuest Next: A Life of Consequence

Will EverQuest Next be the game changer it aims to be? Kevin VanOrd digs into the details.

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What is the next big thing in online role-playing games? As Sony Online Entertainment sees it, we've played the same game over and over again. Massively multiplayer worlds go by different names, and the details differ, but once you've explored enough of them, doesn't it feel as if you've seen everything there is to see?

EverQuest Next aims to be the next big thing. And you get to help make it that way.

I first talked to EverQuest Director of Development Dave Georgeson a few weeks ago about EverQuest Next, and I walked away from our meeting with a feeling I rarely have after getting wind of a new massively multiplayer game: excitement. Dave and his colleagues at Sony Online Entertainment talk a big game, but they clearly believe in their vision. And their vision involves tearing down what we know about MMOGs and building the genre all over again, from the ground up.

How brand new is EverQuest Next? Based on what I saw in my meeting with Georgeson, and later at the SOE Live event in Las Vegas, EQ Next is half evolution, half revolution. And it comes after an earlier version of the game, which began development in 2008, was totally scrapped. At one time, EverQuest Next hadn't earned its "Next" moniker. It was just like all those other games you played before. And that wasn't good enough.

But how new can a game that exists in an established universe be? In certain ways, EverQuest Next is familiar; it takes place in Norrath, and is built on centuries of fictional history. Places like Everfrost and Oasis aren't going away, but they will take on new qualities. They will be newly dynamic, for instance; a place called Lavastorm should have real lava storms, right? These places will also be built with verticality in mind, which doesn't just mean covering Norrath's surface with towering mountains and digging trenches through its plains and plateaus, though it certainly means that too. But it also means tunneling out entire subterranean regions under the surface, giving players massive underground regions to investigate. This verticality isn't just a cosmetic attribute of the new Norrath: In EverQuest Next, everything and anything is made to be destroyed.

Well, not everything can be destroyed, of course, or players would turn Qeynos into a parking lot in a matter of hours. But Norrath is being built from its core outward out of voxels, which means that the environment is no longer a backdrop, but a potential help or hindrance on the battlefield. Your spells will blow holes in the ground underneath unsuspecting monsters (and unhappy comrades!). You can annihilate an earth bridge as orcs cross it so that they plummet into the abyss beneath. In a player-versus-environment setting, you might blow a floating island to smithereens with might and magic. In a player-versus-player setting, you might use a catapult to obliterate a fortification. Dig your way to the caverns winding under your feet, or tumble into a subterranean chamber when an earth elemental pounds the ground beneath you. EverQuest Next's setting isn't just a shallow ghost town created from flimsy facades, or a series of large levels connected by loading screens. It is a true world, with actual geographical strata based on the vast lore EverQuest's designers have been enriching since 1999.

I saw examples of several such environments, some in concept art, and some in fly-throughs and gameplay reels in multiple regions. Feerrott looked both familiar and novel, the dense humid jungle punctuated by rising columns and overhangs that provided plenty of vertical space. A new area called Ashfang featured rocky cliffs and dry canyons that reminded me of PlanetSide 2's mountainous continent of Indar. It's probably not a coincidence, then, that EverQuest Next is being built with a heavily modified version of the Forgelight engine that also powers SOE's massively multiplayer shooter.

Don't take that to mean that EverQuest Next takes its artistic cues from the PlanetSide universe. In fact, its artistic vision doesn't even wholly resemble EverQuest or its sequel, but is instead more stylized. The characters' proportions and animations are exaggerated and highly expressive. When seeing a human female mage in action, I was reminded of BioShock Infinite's Elizabeth: her smiles and smirks were broad and easily discerned from a distance. The male feline kerra I saw in action didn't remind me of any BioShock character, certainly, but his large eyes and lively body language made him no less fun to watch than his human friend. Such spirited animations are meant to inspire role-playing and socialization--not to mention the imaginations of machinima creators.

The character models I saw were vibrant in design and spry in action, and the art design represents a major departure. Much like the Elder Scrolls series, I always saw EverQuest's brand of fantasy as one that imagines what magical creatures would look like if they somehow lived in our plane of existence. Georgeson doesn't see EverQuest Next as that kind of high fantasy, but as "heroic fantasy." Characters in this world should look acrobatic, and environments should look warm and animated. The kerra resemble lions rather than panthers now, while the triangular features of elves and dark elves have been played up. Dwarves are bulkier and more aggressive than ever, while orcs look intelligent and even a bit dignified. I love SOE's focus on flair, but will everyone? I'm curious to find out.

The fluid animations and warm environments came to life in a demonstration of EverQuest Next's parkour system, called heroic movement. When Georgeson first told me of the game's parkour, I was simultaneously intrigued and afraid--intrigued because I love the fluid acrobatics of games like Prince of Persia: The Sands of Time and Assassin's Creed, and afraid because the platforming in other MMOGs is typically boring and awkward. My fears were somewhat alleviated when I finally saw the heroic movement system in action at SOE Live: the characters leaped through the air, vaulted over obstacles, and slid down inclines with an unexpected elegance. The human mage briskly teleported through the air, and the kerra's gliding boots allowed him to gracefully drift over dropoffs.

Slipping and sliding along in this fashion isn't about jumping puzzles--it's supposed to make it fun to move from place to place. Georgeson said of this mechanic, "There's no excuse for boredom." But it was what he talked about next that sounded more like a cure for MMOG boredom: A life of consequence in a world that allows you to permanently affect its history.

We've heard similar promises before, of course. "Our MMOG will make you feel like you have an effect on the world!" we're told, only to discover that our presence and actions have no real meaning. "The dungeon will feel fresh every time you venture through it!" we're told, only for us to expose its patterns in a few playthroughs. But SOE is adamant that EverQuest Next will allow you to participate in the evolution of its world so that each time you play, you can expect the unexpected.

Step one towards an always-evolving world: Implement emergent artificial intelligence.

We've been there before: you go out and kill some wolves, surrounded by other players all on the same wolf-killing quest. You turn in your quest and run through that same area towards a new destination--yet other players are still beating up on those poor wolves, which continually spawn in their prescribed region ad infinitum.

Not in EverQuest Next. In the next iteration of Norrath, enemies and friendlies alike will change their behavior based on how the world evolves around them. Example: Orcs like to ambush adventurers on lonely roads but avoid populated areas--and they sure don't like to hang out where they're likely to get murdered by a crowd of wannabe conquerors. The game will release orcs into the wild, where they will find appropriate places to set up camp. But if the circumstances change--if NPC guards appear, for instance, or if local players are killing too many of their kin--orcs will travel to a locale more favorable to their temperament. This emergent behavior will affect both territory control and combat. When the world changes, the game remembers, creating dynamic quest opportunities where none existed before, and procedurally generated encounters in areas you burrow and climb to.

Step two towards an always-evolving world: Allow players to permanently change the world.

"Permanent" may be a misnomer here. After all, what one builds, one can also tear down. But in EverQuest Next, that's the point. Years after it launches, Georgeson imagines a new player asking a veteran what Norrath was like so long ago, only to receive an impassioned recounting of cities rising from the dust after periods of large-scale destruction. Such dramatic events are at the center of a system called rallying calls.

Rallying calls are somewhat like public quests you've seen in other MMOGs in the sense that all players in the vicinity of the call can participate, but it's there that the similarities end. A rallying call isn't a 15-minute battle that culminates with a boss fight; it's a months-long project that could have you and your fellow heroes building an entire township. Joining a call could have you performing any number of tasks: crafting materials, fending off invaders, and so forth. But the consequences of your actions during a rallying call are dynamic and unpredictable. As the task at hand advances, the emergent AI might cause nearby brutes to feel threatened and attack the village in progress, forcing you to drive them away before they can do great damage to your handiwork. AI-controlled villagers might start digging for rock in a nearby quarry, only to dig so deeply that subterranean lurkers climb to the surface, attacking both you and the nearby wildlife. Enemies might even forge alliances, leading legions of philistines into the vicinity.

Just don't forget: those walls you build won't always be stalwart. There are both triumph and tears, as demonstrated by a gameplay video of a monstrous iron golem taller than a city's highest structure demolishing a wall in a single swipe. Such is the nature of a world built entirely out of destructible pieces.

But what does all of this unpredictability mean if you just click a monster and press buttons until it's dead? What of the core mechanics that drive the moment-to-moment gameplay? In this regard, EverQuest Next is more evolutionary than revolutionary, allowing you to equip two weapons at once that determine some of the skills you can use (an idea Guild Wars 2 has successfully implemented), featuring a multi-class system in which you can mix and match powers from classes you unlock as you play (shades of Final Fantasy XIV Online here), and eschewing the idea of player levels (a la The Secret World). When starting, you choose from one of 8 classes, but as you move through the game, you discover new classes, mixing and matching abilities as you see fit.

As for the level-less system, EverQuest Next's progression is tied to tiers. When Georgeson told me this, I couldn't help but wonder: what's the difference between a level and a tier? He was quick to tell me, however, that the difference isn't just a matter of semantics. Leveling up in a typical role-playing game is a vertical affair: you gain levels and earn rewards, getting more powerful along the way. In EverQuest Next, tiers are horizontal, so you are rewarded with new classes, new weapons, and so forth for accomplishing heroic deeds. Tiers essentially provide you with a travelogue in which your specific exploits unlock new playthings. The world isn't divided into areas by player level, as in, "over here is where players level 20-25 should travel." There are regions you probably shouldn't get too close to when adventuring on your own, of course, but SOE wants you to go where you want to go when you want to go there--and to do it in a vast, seamless, unpredictable world.

It also wants you to play a huge role in EverQuest Next's future.

During my time at SOE Live, I spoke to a number of talented individuals. I spoke to Art Director Rosie Rappaport, who talked to me about the art style, and how EverQuest Next's visual design is meant to have lasting appeal. I spoke to famed video game composer Jeremy Soule, who is the game's musical director, and will be exclusively creating musical scores for SOE MMOGs. (He can, of course, contribute to non-MMOG games outside of SOE.) Soule told me that composing music for EverQuest Next is the equivalent of scoring a half-dozen other games, so I fully expect the game to wallow in the symphonic swooning that is the composer's trademark.

The most important collaboration SOE pushed during their presentation, however, was its collaboration with you, the player. And the center of that collaboration is taking the form of a massively multiplayer creation sandbox called EverQuest Next Landmark. Landmark was born when EverQuest Next's designers began to test one another, daring each other to come up with cooler, more epic creations than the last. So the question was asked: If we gave these tools to the players, what would they do with them?

We will find out this winter. Landmark is a huge set of procedurally generated online worlds that anyone can enter. Once inside, you lay a claim to a plot of land and build what you want, using the same textures and objects the development team use. Georgeson was careful not to say "Minecraft" out loud, but the similarities are obvious: you go out into the world to collect resources and reap the benefits of the land, earning the items you need to bring your ideas to life. But there's a big difference between Minecraft and Landmark, and it's all in the visual detail. Landmark gives you blocks to build with, but by using voxel brushes, smoothing brushes, and other vital tools, you can shape, sculpt, and sand as you like.

Furthermore, SOE's Player Studio software will be built right into EverQuest Next Landmark, allowing players to create their own art, textures, and bundles and sell them to other players. Can you make cool things? You can always try making some dough off of other dedicated Landmark users. Or instead (or in addition), you could always build your creations on a special continent designated for content limited to EverQuest-focused art and lore. If the team likes what you construct, your design could appear in EverQuest Next at launch.

EverQuest Next Landmark is only part of SOE's commitment to its community. SOE President John Smedley pledges that EverQuest Next will be one of the most transparently designed games ever produced. He wants to take the veil off the development process and invite players to participate in the process using a feature called Round Table. Players will discuss what they want to see and give a thumbs up or thumbs down to development concepts; developers will communicate the state of the project and the ideas driving their imaginations. SOE will remain the custodians of the universe, but the community will have an active role in how it takes shape--through Round Table, through EverQuest Next Landmark, and through Player Studio.

At one point during the press conference, Smedley acknowledged that EverQuest Next is "the very definition of biting off more than you can chew." And it would certainly seem that way. The game SOE told me about is risky and ambitious in scope. My mind reels with all the ways players could break an MMOG with destructible environments. It clouds with worry that concepts like emergent AI and parkour-style movement might not be nearly as interesting when implemented as they seem when described.

Yet I can't suppress my excitement over what I heard and saw. At this stage, every element is grounded by a big "if." But "if" SOE can pull off what they want to pull off, EverQuest Next could actually be the next big thing.

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Discussion

296 comments
MegamanX2011
MegamanX2011

In the end the "thing" that will tell if this is a success or another failure will be the combat system. Too much action that gets you tired after 50 levels like TERA or the same old boring hotkey shit system from wow/everquest 1 just won't cut anymore.


We need more strategic battles systems, lower paced, more thinking ahead required. It doesn't need to be chess eithe,r but strategy never gets old. Bring us Atlantica Online or Final Fantasy XI combat system!!

hemmit1
hemmit1

Wildstar was looking promising, now this looks even cooler.

Inconsistancy
Inconsistancy

I have a serious concern, from their reveal. What they said about their movement system.

"You don't have to press any extra buttons for that. It just happens when you encounter 'em..." 

I don't like gameplay being taken from me, and replaced with hand-holding. This reminds me of Brink's "S.M.A.R.T." movement garbage.

Elann2008
Elann2008

It's too early to tell, but it seems like it has very small sandbox areas.. I hope it's very open with a seamless world.

Rake-the-Leaves
Rake-the-Leaves

If they can do what they're promising and include the players to as great of an extent as they say, then perhaps SOE has finally learned from their mistakes with Galaxies.

Caldrin
Caldrin

Want to see more info about the pvp and crafting/resources systems.. if they are done wrong then i wont be playing this.

Morderwrath999
Morderwrath999

solo, group or raid dungeons and areas hey scale it your way, afterall dynamic scaling is in the game, have to be without levels or a level cap.Though I don't see it working without a leveling system im sure they have something.

"the way you like to play", that's what SOE says:).That would fix ALOT of things, emergent AI, should be able to parameter lone, group or raid count.'

o and mercenarys to help out loners that hate groups like me, I could deck out in a few things would be cool. Hence a Dungeon that scales up to 24 down to 6 as low as 1 would be nice.With the tech they have I have a good feeling about EQ NEXT:)

Bryjoered07
Bryjoered07

If this is done right, I could honestly see it as a serious threat to WoW. After all, many of the most hardcore WoW players I know started out on EQ. WoW expanded and improved on the foundations that Everquest started.
To compete with WoW, or even topple it, it has to have some fundamental things that every MMO besides wow is currently lacking.

1. Interesting, Challenging raids, this is the best part of the mmo endgame for many people.

2. Competitive world PVP and instanced PVP

3. Dynamic quests and scaling mobs and loot.

4. Random World Events

5. Great 5-man dungeons

fgjnfgh
fgjnfgh

I'd like to see it on the PS4, Sony

eddieham13
eddieham13

I will either play this or The Elder Scrolls Online for my next mmo I think. 

IllegallyAwesum
IllegallyAwesum

reading this makes me think about how awesome a dragon ball mmo would be with this setup. it gets the twelve year old inside me excited, really

drh3010
drh3010

I'm not seeing the EQ Next carrot. No leveling? No long term advancement? I can play for years and some shmoe who started yesterday can group with me? Sounds like a third-person shooter to me.

But of course we haven't seen everything yet and we know how unimportant first impressions are.

Sigleaf
Sigleaf

I'm a EQ1 and EQ2 fan and I began playing Everquest when I was 8 years old after its first expansion (Ruins of Kunark) in 2000 and I wanted to clarify some comments in this forum after watching the reveal, panels, and other information announced on this game.


First, I wanted to say that after watching the reveal, I was very reluctant to get this game however after thinking about MMO's in a new light and what I wanted from my next MMO I fell in love.  


I remember the GW2 hype and all the grand things that it claimed it would entail and when I played GW2 it was bland, dull, and very shallow.  During this announcement, the devs have confirmed that there will be 8 starting classes with a total # of around 40 or so that you will eventually be able to unlock (all of them).  Each class has two weapon sets (similiar to GW2) that are unique to it, and 4 slots that are designated for utility, offense, defense based on the primary class that can be pooled from ALL of the sub classes.  This is the MAJOR difference in EQNext's class system and GW2's.  Yes, there are 2 fewer buttons you can have, but you can argue that there's only 8 in GW2 because one is a dedicated heal key and the other is a elite skill usually on a 2 min cooldown.  With EQnext's class system you will be able to achieve a plate warrior that can stealth or a mage that can leap stun, simply the possibilities are far more endless than what is allowed in GW2's.


Another staple I feel that that the developers should have really put emphasis in is that items in this game are not merely items with stats, they are items that will give bonuses that can change how your character is fundamentally played.  An example of this was a ring that a warrior has that decreases the cost of teleportation effects, allow that warrior to slot more mage'esque teleporting abilities in his template and turn him into a mage killer.  This system of items with meaning will bring a lot of value to exploring and getting every single one as they will fit in many different builds and as they introduce new classes with more abilities to multi-class and more items it will change how EVERY class is played from that point forward, constantly invigorating the game.


Also, the game is F2P as confirmed by a dev in an interview about a month ago.  It will not cost a dime to play unless you want to be a subscriber.  

flexy456
flexy456

MMORPGs are not "so last decade" because it doesn't matter how 'old' a game genre is but how it is implemented. In a general sense an MMORPG is a virtual "fantasy styled" world where you can play "with others", go on quests, adventures etc. How it is implemented technically is only a matter of technology available (think: Oculus Rift..in a couple of years or so)..while the game PRINCIPLE is the same. Shooters are also "so last decade" but it doesn't matter, there are still good and innovative shooters out there. 

People are complaining that the appeal of MMORPGs is down because people have seen everything already and are getting "player fatigue"...but in my opinion this is entirely wrong because certain games/genres, if done well will always appeal to people. The reasonn MMORPGs lost its appeal today is NOT the genre, but how companies (blizzard) turned otherwise good ideas into abominations. Someone who plays, say, WoW today doesn't log in to explore a fantasy world or go on quests with friends, they log-in because "dailies reset". This alone should give you an idea what is wrong with MMORPGs today. Once people log-in because their dailies reset you know that something must have gone wrong..and its's NOT the genre or not the fact that MMORPGs exist for a decade already..its what developers turned them into...

flexy456
flexy456

Please, please do not only focus on the "destructible environment" aspect since this is NOT what makes a MMORPG good or bad. What makes an MMORPG or RPG good is that a player can and should explore and be able to go on adventures, amongst other things. 

WoW did become bad because they gradually took out all opportunities for people to explore the (otherwise) huge WoW world and turned it into a "daily fest" instead - where the grind and dailies gotten priority over experiencing a fantastic virtual fantasy world. For example, WoW would not get better by adding a destructible environment. There are other important things which make a game good and I hope that Sony KNOWS those things and not only looks at "how great our destructible environment is"...but while doing so forgets the other important things.

MattyTheButcher
MattyTheButcher

How bout no instances, a rotation council and awesome mandatory "train incoming!" hotkeys? EverQuest: Before. Now with more rooting and dots. I would buy that game.

kalgert123
kalgert123

I am not so sure about this one, it looks like a more colorful Guild Wars 2 (And I think GW2 looked dreadful, and the combat also looked dull and repetitive)

Also the cow-creature..Looked a lot like the Tauren from WoW and that isn't exactly a good sign 60% of the time

Now...If we talk about The Elder Scrolls Online (By the way: I changed my mind, I don't want it F2P anymore if anyone caught my posts, I am willing to put down a one-time payment for it, no subscriptions though, I actually don't like being bled money for a game), they promised...What? Interactive enviroments (In the sense that you can break in to a crate and take the stuff inside, plus books and the like), a combat system that looks like Skyrim's combat system (Which if they actually do it, I will say it will get a point plus against GW2 for me, already does with the promise of stealing bread from barrels and crates) and the idea that you can use any weapon/armor set (Being a sneaky warrior that uses magic and bows, oh PLEASE let it be like that)

So...If we do get a TESO that is like that, and we have an Everquest that looks a lot like this preview we have now...Who do you think will win? Well it's probably TESO since The Elder Scrolls series is a more popular RPG series than the Witcher.....Okay fine, They are two different games and are equally 10/10 sort of games...Okay maybe not 10/10, I gave Skyrim an 8 for being pretty and all but I missed some side-activities from Oblivion and the like and Witcher also an 8 because it did have a good story and all, but I was cursed with framerate troubles...But anyway: TES is really popular, no doubt people like Everquest too, but I would rather play a TES MMO than anything else really

Oh while I am at it: Let me share you a bit of a...Joke me and another friend were having about TESO's cinematics: We were talking about a cinematic that is like...The titan 10 races (You know, Khajiit, Dark Elf, Orc and so forth) and we had a talk about how the races looked like a race Stereotype (The Orc being a brutish warrior, the Nord a viking-dressed man with an axe, and the High Elf being a beautiful princess priestess of sorts) and then they all drew sticks, the Imperial race (Which isn't in the game as a playable race) drew the short stick, and one of the races said "I guess you will be the NPC race then?" and then the Imperial was like "I shall be the greatest villain the MMO scene has ever seen!" and then storms out of the room and enters the Developer's offices

So...Imagine that cinematic and how awesome it would be if it were an April Fool's cinematic

Morderwrath999
Morderwrath999

Hope the goe instanced on group as well as raid mobs that dynamic scale ala GW2, that way anyone gets something out of participating without the fear of commitment.

brunorr
brunorr

Hated the cartoony graphics. The game better be good enough for me to put up with playing Disney and WoW characters.

Brazucass
Brazucass

Looks like a series of scripted events. Impossible to say if it will be a good mmorpg.

SphinxDemon
SphinxDemon

I thought this was GW 2 at first <.<;

Morderwrath999
Morderwrath999

If they are going Multi classing I hope its bigger then path of exile's tree lol, they didn't disclose that..opps LOL:) Hey one can dream, right...

Morderwrath999
Morderwrath999

excuse me, vendors for skill tomes at higher ranks.

Morderwrath999
Morderwrath999

Want me to play it, better be solo friendly. I hate make you adopt strange character's for content forced games as the group mechanic.

Morderwrath999
Morderwrath999

LOOTS-hope the system is random and expansive. Lets face it EQ 1 and 2 had really vanilla generic drops. EQ 2

used to upset me, hey look no skill tome vender-lame, but they were random drops, but wait-there's the same vanilla

drop magic item I found 4 hours ago. I hope they fix this in Eq next, aside from making a loot system that topples Diablo 2, or fate 2.Crafting should be optional. Now if you could mix, match and build items in landmark what would be nice..Call it Eq next TREASURES LOL.

ninedot
ninedot

Looks pretty cool to me. Will I have the time to play it - maybe...if I can get my time management under control. 

thaddusbly
thaddusbly

Looks like GW2 combat with WoW models. 

ScouseMelon
ScouseMelon

MMO's are so last decade. They've been done to death in every possible way. Why are dev's still wasting their time making them.

NaturallyEvil
NaturallyEvil

Every time a developer talks up the destructible environments and AI to this extent, they are always full of crap.  I find it's a good identifier to tell what developers are completely talking out of their asses, and this guy definitely fits the criteria.

I'm not saying that the game won't be good, but you can expect the environment system and AI to be nothing like what he described when the game launches.

AzatiS
AzatiS

Well i watched a video and game has no Trinity system ... Will be another random , hit with whatever spell , Zerg all raid bosses game..


Too bad...

Lambchopzin
Lambchopzin

@drh3010 Yeah I know nobody wants to talk about this but some sort of carrot is important for MMOs. I know that might sound like antiquated thinking to some but that's how you keep people playing. What that carrot is can be any number of things but it has to be there and it has to be satisfying enough for people to sink a bunch of hours into the game to get it.

But SOE isn't exactly a newcomer to the genre, I'm sure it's something they just haven't talked about much yet, but they have a pretty good idea of how they want to do it. As far as marketing is concerned, talking about how you plan to keep players addicted (for lack of a better term) is usually not a great way to generate buzz. Not something I would necessarily expect to hear about at the grand unveiling.

iomor27
iomor27

@flexy456 I would agree. People will always play games they like and draw them in, but they can only play for so long before it gets old or they burn out on it. Granted, some will not have an issue with this, but I think most gamers will get tired of the same game after a while. If this is truly a new and fresh game with a different twist on MMOs, then I think it will draw people in. But as you said, it's how the devs keep it new and fresh that will determine the life of the game.

eddieham13
eddieham13

@flexy456 Also a good amount of content at all levels.

Star Wars The Old Republic was awesome when it wasn't free to play but after you maxed level there was no content at all for end gamers. So people left and now its gone free to play and horrible.

Also it can't be too easy. Soo many players including myself have left World of Warcraft because they have nerfed the entire game so 5 year olds can play it. It is so easy now. They made the Dungeons easy and meaningless, quests are easy, getting money is easier and quicker than before and so is levelling up you either get more exp or require less than you used to.

ryadings
ryadings

@MattyTheButcher Yes, needs more skills. Back when I played an assassin I was told I looked like an organist while doing my rotation. I once tried to map a keyboard (the music one) as an input device but that didn't work out so well...

Morderwrath999
Morderwrath999

@kalgert123 I hated Skyrim Worst in the series with however the best storyline. Please HELL NO don't knock off TESO online. When peeps see no stats and no loot system for the online game we'll see how many stay onboard playing...

Morderwrath999
Morderwrath999

mmo should never mean play it group or don't. Thats lame.Been done a billion times over.Scary if they do a non level treadmill game, too.Level treadmill systems aren't a prob, its how they are structred to work that makes the difference.

Morderwrath999
Morderwrath999

wait that's the name of a certain type of club, that would be a different type of game-TREASURES.my bad-grins.

Morderwrath999
Morderwrath999

if they have emergent AI and how the game works don't burn me out on drops 60 hours later..

Morderwrath999
Morderwrath999

especially if they can really do and have working emergent AI-The LOOTS Post(below).

Elann2008
Elann2008

@thaddusbly 

Let the comparisons begin!   Because it's easier than coming up with meaningful discussions! 

brunorr
brunorr

@ScouseMelon Last decade? FPS's and RTS's are so 90s and they are still around.

kalgert123
kalgert123

@Morderwrath999 @kalgert123 Well honestly....That's your own bloody opinion if you think that Skyrim was "The Worst in the series"

And what are you talking about "No stats and no loot systems"? as far as I saw from a demo that they had, they mentioned that if you join in to a fight that's already happening, you still get some sort of loot

Admit it: You want a TES MMO as much as everyone else

Morderwrath999
Morderwrath999

if you progress naturally in differet things over time that's fine, but what of things like health, stamina or mana?

Morderwrath999
Morderwrath999

@kalgert123 @Morderwrath999 ok what I mean when I see loots-is multiple stats for the loot. Multiple stats for character, ex armor has a defense, a weight rating and a value of coin, abit more in my mmo please.Characters have stamina mana and health, a little lacking imo..theres my clarification ad yes I will prob try it.