Assassin’s Creed IV: Building a Fictional Tale in an Authentic World

Kevin VanOrd sits down with three talents to unveil the amount of research and care being poured into Assassin's Creed IV: Black Flag.

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At San Diego Comic-Con 2013, I boarded a pirate ship and stared down three strong-willed scallywags, yet somehow managed to escape unscathed.

Well, I wasn’t actually in any real danger. That ship was a repurposed sea vessel representing the Jackdaw from Assassin’s Creed IV: Black Flag, and those scallywags were passionate and talented men striving to make the upcoming sequel as dramatic as possible, while still keeping its world grounded in the reality of the Caribbean of the 18th Century. I didn’t emerge from my time on the Jackdaw with a peg leg or a wisecracking parrot, but I did come away with a better understanding of the effort that goes into making a modern-day blockbuster like Assassin’s Creed.

Scallywag 1: Darby McDevitt, Lead Writer

This wasn’t my first discussion with McDevitt, who outlined for me the ins and outs of writing new protagonist Edward Kenway a few months back. This time, however, I got a clearer glimpse of the process of crafting a world grounded in reality. First, there are the journeys--trips to the Dominican jungle, to Havana, to the high seas of the Caribbean. The storytelling process begins with research, and at this stage, the concept isn’t even a sure thing; the development team first has to create target renders and pitch the game to Ubisoft leadership.

It doesn’t sound as if Assassin’s Creed IV was a difficult concept to pitch, however. The era was ripe with colorful characters and the region was flooded with immense riches, thanks to multinational trade routes. Furthermore, during that time period, the father of Assassin's Creed III’s Haytham Kenway would have been in his 20s, which would have made him the right age for the pirating lifestyle. And like Assassin’s Creed IV’s other characters, Haytham’s father Edward Kenway would have been a product of his times. Many of Kenway’s pirating peers would have been sailors, possibly from a navy; most of them would have been single; and the majority of them would have been drunks. Not only were the time and setting brimming with potential, but it also meant that Ubisoft Montreal would expand on the naval combat they introduced in Assassin’s Creed III. It was a perfect storm of possibilities.

Once the game was greenlit, it was time to continue the researching process before entering the design and scripting phase. Game development and script writing do not happen independently, however, but are part of an ongoing dialogue between the writers and the designers. McDevitt showed me the tool the team uses to document their work, which resembles a souped-up version of screenwriting software Final Draft. Here, every sequence is mapped out from a story and design perspective, though not every idea sees the light of day. And sometimes, they are the ideas the writer holds most dear.

Appropriately enough, throwing out a beloved idea for the greater good is known as “murdering your darlings.” And doing so has broken many an author’s heart.

But when it comes to writing, harsh truths must be faced. Sometimes, scenes or missions aren’t working well. Sometimes, they bog down the pacing, or unnecessarily bloat the narrative. And sometimes, a cutscene isn’t the right tool for the job--not when the moment calls for action. McDevitt never wants the player to be watching a cutscene, wishing he or she could join in on the fun; whenever possible, story beats are communicated through gameplay, not through noninteractive scenes.

And so the design and writing staff pass the ideas back and forth, iterating and reiterating, arguing and submitting in turn, until the ideas are implemented and tested. As it turns out, even game designers have to murder their darlings from time to time. McDevitt shared how the design team looked at the map of the Caribbean and plotted out a perfect arena within which the gameplay might take place. The problem? The region they saw as the most apt for the intended gameplay loop didn’t accurately reflect how and where actual pirates of the period would be spending their time. The back-and-forth then continued--designing, then scripting, then repeating--until the teams had a concept they could both embrace.

Scallywag 2: Matt Ryan, Actor

As it happens, Ubisoft is an underhanded lot. When actor Matt Ryan auditioned for the part of Edward Kenway, he didn’t know the character starred in an Assassin’s Creed game. Instead, he thought he was trying out for a role on a television program entitled “Black Flag.”

Ubisoft keeps its casting calls a secret. After all, the publisher doesn’t want actors’ audition scripts to leak, possibly spoiling story points or other vital information before Ubi is ready to share with the rest of the world. In fact, the casting was done so early in the development process that the team hadn’t yet settled on a name, though eventually the code name “Black Flag” would become Assassin’s Creed IV’s subtitle.

I don’t know if Ryan will be the perfect Edward Kenway, but the man certainly commands a room just by existing within it. He speaks in a lovely British lilt that immediately demands attention, and it’s hard to take your eyes off his dark features and thick eyebrows. It’s also easy to get lost in his stories of his involvement with Assassin’s Creed IV, beginning with his tales of motion capture. In this game, as in many others, the actors don’t just provide voices: they act out their roles with motion-capture nodes attached to their bodies and a camera strapped to their heads, each gesture and facial tic recorded for use in the game.

Ryan shared how hyperconscious he was of the head camera for a while, unsure of where to direct his eyes and how to behave naturally with an electronic apparatus staring him in the face. But in time, the experience became liberating, merging the immediacy of live theater with a television-style sound stage. Because the entire scene is recorded in full, the actors cannot just stop mid-sentence and start over again if they make an error or are unhappy with a line reading. (Doing so would make a lot of unnecessary drudgery for the game’s animators.) Furthermore, there are no stage cameras to play to: the motion capture technology allows the actors to perform without regard for where cameras might be pointing. Except for the baubles attached to his body and the hardware strapped to his noggin, Ryan found the performance style remarkably freeing.

As for playing Edward, Ryan didn’t adopt an unrealistically thick accent, the kind you associate with pirates. (The cliched accent we know and love was based on Robert Newton’s interpretation of Long John Silver in the film Treasure Island, and was modeled after England’s West Country accent.) Pirates didn’t just come from the West Country, but indeed from Wales (Bartholomew Roberts), Ireland (Anne Bonny), and, of course, outside of the British Isles. Edward’s speech patterns are not built around “yarrrs,” but are certainly fiercer and more direct than Ryan’s natural soft-spoken cadence. That’s as it should be, given how much fiercer Edward’s fighting style is from the Assassins that came before him.

Scallywag 3: Mike Loades, Weapons Expert

I feel reasonably certain that Mike Loades’ home must be decorated with rapiers and rifles, and not just because of his clear passion for weapons of all types. Loades told me of a number of deadly implements that belong to his personal collection, including a homemade blowgun of such a length that you could slide it through the underbrush and blow a murderous dart at your foe with him or her being none the wiser.

That kind of sneaky violence may not be the way of the samurai, but it certainly was the way of the Caribbean’s privateers, who picked up plenty of tricks on their travels, including a bit of blowgun expertise from the coast of South America. In fact, while the Assassin’s blade as we know it is a fictional weapon, similar mechanical appliances were in use at the time. Pirates loved those kinds of gadgets, just as they loved weapons that were two apparatuses in one. But the weapon of choice was the cutlass, sometimes even two, perhaps with knuckle guards to bash an opponent’s skull before finishing him off with a final strike.

Mike didn’t just make sure that Assassin’s Creed IV’s weapons are authentic, but that Edward uses them appropriately. Pirates had little use for flamboyant flourishes, and Edward’s animations reflect that. The team started with Connor’s animations from Assassin’s Creed III and gradually adjusted them to account for Edward’s character and the fighting methods of the era. Edward isn’t one for showing off; he gets to the point when face to face with his attackers. Forget the excess twirls.

As for that blowgun, well, Edward’s isn’t so long that he can slide it through the foliage, but it does allow him to put enemies to sleep or enrage them enough to attack their comrades. The single-player demo of the game I saw after my discussions with McDevitt, Ryan, and Loades gave me hope that Black Flag’s stealth options will be more effective--and more satisfying--to perform. In fact, the demo featured little in the way of direct combat, instead focusing on surreptitious takedowns, including a good-ol’ Ezio Auditore double-blade assassination.

The influence of Ubisoft’s own Far Cry 3 could be keenly felt in the demo. For instance, you can disable a bell that an alerted guard might use to call attention to your presence, and there are even explosive barrels you can ignite to distract foes (or just eliminate them entirely). According to McDevitt, the entire stealth gameplay loop has been tightened up considerably. Completing objectives sneakily shall reward you with more gold and other rewards, and snipers can desync you with just a few hits. As if to reinforce just how viable stealth will be in Assassin’s Creed IV, the demo ended with Edward not stabbing his target from behind or swashbuckling his way to victory, but simply pickpocketing the key he needed and sneaking off before the object could be missed.

Three scallywags. Three points of view. One expensive game. After the interviews, a party raged across the boat, but I chose to sneak away, Edward Kenway-style. Fortunately, I was able to escape without reaching for my blowgun, and every attempt to pickpocket partygoers as I slipped past was met with unfortunate glares. Clearly not everyone enjoyed my attempt to put into practice what I learned that evening.

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Written By

GameSpot senior editor Kevin VanOrd has a cat named Ollie who refuses to play Rock Band because he always gets stuck pla

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Discussion

195 comments
phoenix5352
phoenix5352

an assassin's creed story established in between the era of pirates and in that locations is perfect fit for the franchise

hastati4
hastati4

More than anything I want them to put the emphasis back on stealth gameplay, and I think they might actually be doing that. I'm undecided on whether or not I like the setting, or the focus on naval gameplay, but the open world aspect of it, and the seamlessness of it all has me intrigued.


I've stopped caring much about the story, since it's obviously being stretched out so they can keep releasing games year after year, but I really think I'll enjoy the gameplay in ACIV. Provided it is relatively bug free, that is.

sev2010
sev2010

not interested at all, out dated graphics for next-gen and more important AC's gameplay has become lets just say BORING

Gamer_4_Fun
Gamer_4_Fun

I enjoyed AC,  I loved AC2, but I hated AC3. Should I like this game? Feeling right now is: meh.

Gadeos
Gadeos

Rejoice, upcoming AC are: a warrior from India, then from Japan, then Mongolian, then Mayan, then... maybe when PS6 comes out we'll finally see the ending of this franchise's story

TacoKing90
TacoKing90

My only gripe so far (and it's extremely trivial) is that Edward doesn't have any holsters for his guns in game....and sword sheathes would be nice too...but that's it, besides that I can't wait for this game :D

Djwolfram
Djwolfram

Ubisoft needs to get better writers immediately.Brotherhood,Revelations,AC 3 and FC 3 have shitty stories

DaRq_MiNoS
DaRq_MiNoS

Tom McShea is a serious fweener.

tallman
tallman

One thing that HAS TO return  is JESPER KYD..the Soundtracks R awesome and beautifull

KoRniTo
KoRniTo

I'm a little worried on the story side of things, besides that, I know it will be a beautiful game with solid gameplay.

ddoggbritt16
ddoggbritt16

A i the only one who enjoyed ac3 in fact its my 3rd favorite ac game starting with 1,2,3,revelations,brotherhood

ddoggbritt16
ddoggbritt16

Does anyone know what the actual story is about

PrpleTrtleBuBum
PrpleTrtleBuBum

By AC2 I was getting very bored with the gameplay and the over-arching Animus plot is pretty stupid too. But as long as the virtual history tourism is there, I don't really care and will get the game. I still wish they went with some other theme but bleh.

WehrmachtBear
WehrmachtBear

I firmly believe that Assassin's Creed shouldn't have Multiplayer, but a Co-Op experience instead.

WehrmachtBear
WehrmachtBear

Fuck the Animus plot. Just do a raw "Assassins and History" plot. That shit got boring.

soulfulDAGGER
soulfulDAGGER

Really hope to be able to turn off the on screen hints. When I get a mission "Find the long lost treasure map" for example, I don't want a giant arrow pointing where to go to find it. Ok Ubisoft?! Thanks.

daviddiorio
daviddiorio

I'm actually pretty excited about this game hopefully they don't mess it up. 

udubdawgz
udubdawgz

all i hope is for the next creed game to have the options available to turn off the dumbing-down and handholding.

as well, i sure hope Capt. Morgan is being paid some royalties, since, creed4 reminds me of their rum commercial, lol.

i think that's where they got their inspiration;)

Don_Mattrick
Don_Mattrick

AC 3 was one of the worst AC game i ever played, it didn't feel like an Assassin game, i mean i could just walk in a fort through the front gate and kill everyone without getting hit once...what da hell is that?!, i thought this was an ASSASSINS game.

The only REAL assassin's game was 1, 2 was a lil bit ( "Assassin"), but 3....if he wasn't wearing a hood i would never call him an Assassin.

The combat, the story, they were...horrible, and the UI i absolutely hated it, it didn't feel like it's an Animus UI at all.

And the setting was...boring.

They just ruined it.

And now they have pirates :S, i think this wasn't planned in the first place, i think they saw that people liked the naval gameplay and thought a pirate game would be great , i don't think that was their actual setting in the first place.

I miss when Assassin's creed was about Assassin's , when the story was interesting and great :/

i would love something in Europe, in Arabia and in Asia, but not the Americans.

And the mysteries that were in AC 1 and AC 2 like the writings on Desmond's wall and such, and the mystery of the story itself....i adored that

AC3 characters were not interesting at all, and personally  would liked the game if it was about Haythem when he used to be an Assassin instead of Connor.

I really want Patrice Désilets in his seat, he did a phenomenal job IMO, he is just brilliant.

Ryioooo
Ryioooo

@TacoKing90 Check twitter for Ashraf Ismail and check the tweets he already talked 'bout the holsters and he said that the game is not finished yet and it was a demo mistake..

mastermetal777
mastermetal777

@Djwolfram Their stories were pretty good, actually, especially Far Cry 3. What the hell made them so terrible?

gamefreak215jd
gamefreak215jd

@tallman I recall free running on  the rooftops of venice,the pinkish tinge of the setting sun,the awesome OST...for a moment I forgot what actually the game was about.

xXl_z3r0_lXx
xXl_z3r0_lXx

@ddoggbritt16 IMO Brotherhood was waaaay better than AC3. AC3 was too short, the side missions were small and there were far too many that were almost completely unrewarding. Not to mention the crafting system was a bit broken and there were almost no upgrades to your equipment at all. I ended up getting stuck with the same gear through the whole game. That and it kind of just felt like a side story to The Patriot. I actually liked brotherhood, but AC3 was severely disappointing with almost none of the changes being for the better. Also the end sequence was the worst in the whole series.

Bumblebee1138
Bumblebee1138

@ddoggbritt16 I don't think AC3 was the best but I indeed enjoyed it. It got good gameplay and story.

But I loose all hope in the franchise after seeing that petty excuse for an ending.

EL_Bomberdor
EL_Bomberdor

@WehrmachtBear  

I don't know. Assassins mulitplayer has always been 'almost but not quite' to me. Great ideas having to bluff your apponant but lacked something.

JVjefke
JVjefke

@Don_Mattrick  I kinda agree with you. I Liked 1 and 2 but the expensions and 3 not so much.

I liked AC1 because it was something new and the story was great. I liked AC2 because of the VERY beautiful setting. After that it just felled like it was just another (dumbed down) AC. especially with the expensions of AC2. 

They tried to do something completely new with 3, which i applauded but it kinda turned out to be the same game as AC2 but in a (for me) less suitable environment. 

I fear that AC4 will be like AC3. they'll put some new things in there but essentially it will not be enough to keep me going, unless they put in a great story like AC1

sev2010
sev2010

@mastermetal777 @Djwolfram AC3's story was awesome but the rest of em................... lets jus say i agree with OP

ddoggbritt16
ddoggbritt16

@xXl_z3r0_lXx @ddoggbritt16 ac 3 is way longer then brotherhood i got all the gear before i beat the game and it is really good.Anyways with all of the side quests ac brothehood is 22+hours while ac 3 is 40 hours+ with all of the side quests.I didnt really like the story of brotherhood while i really liked the story of number 3

KaptajnKnap
KaptajnKnap

@Bumblebee1138 @ddoggbritt16 I never got that far. I tripped over Witcher 2 and forgot AC3, I though it was the worst in the series. I'd love to love it, but they try too hard, it's not flowing. Way too much of the cinematic scenes and not enough action on the scale they try to reach, and it always comes out kinda halfassed to me.. Looking forward for AC4 though, seem very fluid! And the open world looks really interesting, not to mention the combat system; it looks fucking sweet!

udubdawgz
udubdawgz

@EL_Bomberdor @WehrmachtBear  

if it works well, then, they or someone else should make a completely separate game.

keep the multi away from my single player games.

xXl_z3r0_lXx
xXl_z3r0_lXx

@ddoggbritt16 @xXl_z3r0_lXx I managed to get 30 hours out of brotherhood. AC3 all the side quests that actually reward you with something is like 40 hours I guess, but there was absolutely no incentive to finish most of them. If you did all of them, you could probably hit like 60 hours but you wasted 20 on nothing of value. At least Brotherhood's sidequests got you somewhere.

greenshadow222
greenshadow222

@Don_Mattrick @Bumblebee1138 @ddoggbritt16Wow, there really is nothing like a game that starts out pretty good with an excellent assassin (Haytham) which then dumps him after a an  hour of game play and then proceeds to spend the remainder of the game with a big boring oaf  who's goal is to kill the fun character from the beginning.  I almost didn't finish AC3.  And when I did it left such a rotten taste in my mouth that I am not expecting much from the franchise any more.  I think I wil wait to buy this one till I hear word on the internet.

Bumblebee1138
Bumblebee1138

@ddoggbritt16 @Bumblebee1138 As far as I know the new Assassin is the grandpa of Connor (main protagonist of AC3) and is a married pirate who have sex with other women. (?!!) In Modern story you're a Abstergo agent using Desmond's DNA to view his ancesstor's memories, and the modern part is 1st person view and is "optional".

Yes. That much fucked up.