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Review

The Evil Within 2 Review

  • First Released Oct 12, 2017
    released
  • Reviewed Oct 12, 2017
  • PC
  • XONE
  • PS4

Dead by dawn

Innovating within the bounds of horror's familiar tropes and rules is a difficult task, but one that The Evil Within 2 handles with grace. Developer Tango Gameworks cleverly introduces old-school horror design within the confines of a semi-open world that ultimately makes for a refreshing trip into a world of nightmares.

Picking up several years after the first game, we find the former detective Sebastian Castellanos in dire straits, still wracked with guilt over the loss of his family and haunted by his last visit into a nightmare version of reality. When a shadowy organization gives him the chance to set things right with his past and rescue his daughter from the dangerous and unstable world of Union, he willingly re-enters the haunting realm despite his residual trauma.

Right from the beginning, there's a sense of deja vu as Sebastian wanders the eerie and unreal locations in Union. Despite being one of the few survivors from the first game, he oddly finds himself falling for the same tricks and set-ups that the world and its inhabitants lay out for him. While this could be chalked up to a simple retread, much of these instances make a point of illustrating some key differences from this game and the last.

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There's generally more of an adventurous feel compared to the original's isolated levels. With more side characters to interact with--opening up moments of dialogue that flesh out the story--and optional events scattered around the world, there's a level of freedom and variety in The Evil Within 2 that was largely absent from the first game. However, there are a few notable sections where backtracking is required, which slows the pacing and sense of progression to a crawl.

Despite this, exploration is consistently enjoyable, rewarding treks to the places tucked away, where you can find details about Union's history and meet other characters looking to survive the nightmare. With so many little details that add a lot to atmosphere, there's a clear respect for The Evil Within's world. The many nods to original game feel more impactful for it, giving a renewed appreciation for Sebastian's previous adventure.

Compared to its predecessor's singular levels in unique chapters, The Evil Within 2 possesses a more organic and interconnected set of places to explore--focusing on several large maps with multiple points of interest. While there's still plenty of mind-bending and perspective-skewing set pieces, such as a tentacle creature with a large camera for an eye, the explorable spaces are the real standout. In many ways, it's like traversing through a demented amusement park filled with hideous creations, forcing yourself to face past horrors. Adventuring to places not marked on the map often yields valuable resources, and also leads to some surprising encounters with obsessive ghosts and multiple unnerving, fourth-wall breaking events.

It takes more than just going for the head to take out some of the tougher enemies.
It takes more than just going for the head to take out some of the tougher enemies.

Over time, environments descend into chaos when Union inevitably grows unstable, turning a small town into a horrifying and unnerving shell of its former self. Streets vertically upend, and fire and blood exude from places they shouldn't. The visual design of The Evil Within 2 successfully juxtaposes vastly different settings and aesthetics, and presents them in a bizarre package that illustrates the erratic and unpredictable nature of the world.

While Sebastian felt more like a mere sketch of a hardened and weary protagonist in his first outing, he feels better realized and more grounded in this sequel, giving a certain gravitas to his struggle. Showing bewilderment and confusion throughout the first game, he's more confident and determined this time, even throwing in some fitting one-liners that poke fun at some of the dangers in the last game. The supporting cast of villains also feel more active in the ongoing events, and have a greater sense of place this time around--particularly with the eccentric serial killer artist who photographs his victims upon their deaths.

The Evil Within 2 successfully juxtaposes vastly different settings and aesthetics, and presents them in a bizarre package that illustrates the erratic and unpredictable nature of the world.

While there's occasional moments of cheese and humor throughout--such as the inclusion of a goofy shooting range and collectible toys related to other Bethesda games--the levity never feels out of place, which is an accomplishment considering the game's pervasive macabre atmosphere.

Putting a greater emphasis on the survival aspect of survival horror, The Evil Within 2 demands resource management and bravery in its relatively spacious world. While common enemies are fewer in number compared to the original game, they're far more threatening alone and can easily manhandle Sebastian. There's a thoughtful approach to engagement and progression this time around, which means you'll have to think twice about whether or not to engage a group of enemies. With that said, you have a sizable arsenal of weapons and gear--including the return of the Crossbow with six different ammo types--to take on the enemies as you see fit.

Some encounters will pull out all the stops to prevent Sebastian from making progress.
Some encounters will pull out all the stops to prevent Sebastian from making progress.

Throughout his journey, Sebastian carries a communication device, allowing him to keep track of main objectives, along with points of interest and intel on the fates of side characters in the area. How you go about dealing with these characters and exploring is up to you. Similarly, whether you avoid conflict with enemies or take out as many as possible along the way is down to your preferred playstyle. The Evil Within 2 accommodates those that prefer action as much as those that like to be stealthy. Combat is robust, thanks to improved weapon handling and character upgrading that allows you to focus on the specific areas of Sebastian's skillset to enhance stealth, combat, and athleticism.

Sebastian can return to the safe haven of his mind to upgrade weapons and skills, and review case files and intel on various characters. With the Green Gel collected from fallen enemies--and the new Red Gel that unlocks upper tier upgrades--the core upgrading system has been greatly improved. Going beyond simply increasing damage of melee strikes and stamina length, new special perks can be unlocked such as the ever-useful Bottle Break skill that uses bottles as self-defense items when grabbed by enemies. Along with the expanded weapon upgrade system, using only weapon parts, the systems of progression feel far more nuanced and open.

Sebastian will have to scavenge for supplies and other materials to make up for the lack of ammo boxes and health items. While this may seem like it can make things easy, efficient crafting can only be done at dedicated workbenches, whereas crafting in the field via the radial inventory menu should be done a last resort as it costs twice as many materials. This crafting element adds a bit of a survivalist feel to The Evil Within 2, where you're scrounging around corners to find materials, all while avoiding packs of enemies looking to pummel you.

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Though the game is challenging even on its standard difficulty level, it's not unfair, and there are options for multiple playstyles. The standard Survival difficulty mode is manageable, and you won't find yourself hitting a way due to lack of resources. However, the Nightmare mode raises the stakes, featuring slightly altered combat encounters, harder enemies, and fewer resources to find. If you're up for a challenge of a different kind, the unlockable Classic mode will disable auto-saves, upgrades, and limit you to a finite amount of saves. In addition to extra unlockables for completing the tougher difficulties, the experiences they offer is more in keeping with the true survival horror experience, where resources are hard to come by, and the enemies are deadlier than before.

There's a clear respect for the horror genre in The Evil Within 2, with a number of references to classic films and games. The game channels that style and tone into combat that feels brutal and raw, stealth that has an air of suspense, and unsettling confrontations with dangerous, otherworldly creatures. The Evil Within 2 doubles down on the core of what makes survival horror games great: the focus on disempowerment and obstacles, and the ensuing satisfaction that comes with surviving a harrowing assault.

Though there's some occasional technical hiccups that result in some particularly frustrating moments and weird pacing issues, this horror sequel elevates the tense and impactful survival horror experience in ways that feel fresh and exciting. What this cerebral horror game does isn't totally new, but it rarely feels routine, and offers plenty of surprises. Coming in at a lengthy and surprisingly packed 15-hour campaign, the sequel does an admirable job of ratcheting up the tension and scares when it needs to, while also giving you the freedom to explore and proceed how you want. It's a tough thing to balance, but The Evil Within 2 does it remarkably well, and in a way that leaves a strong and lasting impression after its touching conclusion.

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The Good
Haunting and macabre atmosphere that pulls you into the lead character's struggle
Varied and inventive level design that switches things up considerably
Improved upgrading and weapon system that allows for more customization based on player choice
Solid storytelling and improved narrative that conveys a complex and touching narrative
The Bad
Weird pacing issues and inconsistencies across some chapters, and backtracking can be a drag
8
Great
About GameSpot's Reviews

About the Author

Alessandro enjoys survival horror games and thinks the Resident Evil remake is one of the best games ever made. While he found the original Evil Within to be mostly entertaining, he was very surprised at how much of an improvement the sequel is. Bethesda provided a complimentary PS4 copy of the game for the purposes of this review, with other members of staff playing the PC and Xbox One versions.
255 Comments  RefreshSorted By 
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yukushi

I dont play games that score less than a 8 in reviews because its all about quality so I will be buying this

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elmarine2064

@yukushi: So if IGN tell you to go jump off a bridge; are you?

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MaddenBowler10

@yukushi: That's pretty lame. There's been plenty of games below 8 on here that I thoroughly enjoyed.

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Subaru1980

@yukushi: About survival-horror, there a was game with a 6/10 at GameSpot and deserved at least an 8/10. The game is Alien Isolation. Both GameSpot and IGN murdered it, the fans loved it.

I don't trust scores anymore.

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Bread_or_Decide

@Subaru1980: Alien Isolation is a mother loving masterpiece. Beat it on the hardest difficulty. That alien scared the living crap out of me. Yeah, it's got a high learning curve, so what. Learn it, play it, love it.

Online
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RSM-HQ

@Bread_or_Decide: Masterpiece is pushing dood.

Alien Isolation is Outlast for people nostalgic to the Alien brand. If you like it that's perfectly fine, but don't compare it to this breed,

This is real Survival Horror to the kin of Silent Hill and the older Resident Evil games. If it's not your thing? Just play Outlast 2 or something.

Personally sick of everyone bringing up a hiding simulator when it's barely related to these games

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santinegrete

@Subaru1980: great thinking man. I have my share of 7 and 6, even a 5, I enjoyed. Yes, they had problems, but I was so intrigued by watching gameplay that I just jumped at the right time/price.

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JEF8484

@yukushi: Theres many great 7's, especially on this site.

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Subaru1980

@JEF8484: Prey and Alien Isolation got 6/10 at GameSpot, while both are really great games

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Gelugon_baat

@Subaru1980: I don't think that Alien: Isolation is a good game. It has a lot of padding.

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Bread_or_Decide

@Gelugon_baat: If you're a reviewer rushing through the game then yes it has a lot of padding. If you're a normal gamer and play a few hours a week it feels like a long and engrossing experience.

Online
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Gelugon_baat

@Bread_or_Decide: I knew about the game from the start to the end. It's not an engrossing experience. It's just long, and heavily padded. There is just not enough variety in its gameplay elements.

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Itzsfo0

@Gelugon_baat: Its not engrossing for you, others disagree -everyone is different padding is fine, every game has it.

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Gelugon_baat

@Itzsfo0: I disagree. I have played games where there is always something new from start to the end, nothing that I perceive as padding.

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NacroticReaper

@Gelugon_baat: I don't think it needed a "variety in its gameplay elements", it was a game for hardcore Alien fans that wanted the feel of the first movie, and it delivered on that note.

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Gelugon_baat

@nacroticreaper: Then I would say that those fans should have just watched the movie again instead of playing the game.

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Lyckant

@nacroticreaper: Absolutely true man. Alien Isolation is perfect for Alien fans, not so perfect for people who won't realize why us fans jumped from the seat when we saw the resemblance between Torrens and Nostromo, or when we got to see the Engineer's ship in all its beauty. That game is a love letter to fans.

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sleepnsurf

@yukushi: Sheeeeeeeeeeeep! How many fedoras ya got?

Online
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Itzsfo0

@sleepnsurf: but sheep are cool, and fedoras get you laid. relax

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rabih55555

I did no like the 1st one. Resident Evil 7 was way better

But I heard that 2nd one is better than original. Might give it a try

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triplebullet

@rabih55555: RE7 was so legit. I didn't expect to even beat it and I fell in love with it.

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PCGameboy

The first one sucked, so i will pass on this too. Don't trust critics when it comes to horror games.

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Bread_or_Decide

@pcgameboy: I got stuck at box head. It's got a weird unfair design and difficulty that rubbed me the wrong way.

Online
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EdwardNygma

I liked the first one and this looks to be better. Can't wait to play.

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p1p3dream

I can't decide!!!

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santinegrete

@p1p3dream: and I can't pay! :(

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RSM-HQ

About ten hours in and feel I'm almost done with NG, very much enjoying it. Not surprised with hipsters in the comments spiting garbage.

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sukraj

@RSM-HQ: glad your enjoying the game I'm still waiting for my copy to arrive I ordered it from Amazon UK

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RSM-HQ

@sukraj: I'll do my best not to spoil anything, hope yours comes today dood and have a fun time with it :D

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sukraj

@RSM-HQ: thanks bro

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videogameninja

It’s funny but whenever the term survival-horror is brought up in the context of the last 5 or so years my mind instinctively deviates towards The Evil Within (Resident Evil 7 aside.).

It’s true there have been other developers giving their shot at the genre such as Red Barrels with Outlast or Frictional Games with Amnesia but those games seemed to concentrate more on the concept of hiding and running away than actually facing the evil that lay head on.

Personally speaking, the survival horror genre has always been one of tense and frightening moments for myself, one that combined those elements with limited ammo/weapons/inventory in the face of insurmountable odds.

In that sense the first Evil Within succeeded in drawing inspiration from older titles of the survival horror genre, most notably the original installments in the Resident evil franchise. As such, it’s easy to understand how someone who was a fan of earlier attempts at the survival horror genre would resonate with certain elements throughout its nightmarish campaign.

That said it still wasn’t perfect. The story/narrative, while amusing and even intriguing at first, quickly became more ridiculous and “cheesy” as the game progressed. The plot itself also seemed quite convoluted considering it was a rather simple premise/story that was being spun. Add in some rather “cliché” characters with the personalities of a room full of furniture to go along with the “hit-or-miss” voice acting and I can see how some may just gloss over the premise all together (Personally I found it quite amusing but anyway.).

Still, those moments didn’t detract from me personally enjoying my time with this game and when one considers the time that it was released it’s easy to see how many considered it at the time a true “successor” to the RE franchise rather than the later numbered games themselves (again, excluding 7.).

From the review here it sounds like the developers have taken great strides to not only expand but to improve the build of the first while addressing issues that held the first installment back from truly being an unforgettable title.

That’s comforting if not reassuring as I’m sure there are many out there that felt those same issues were some of the main reasons holding it back from being a truly great game; one to be considered in that list of illustrious survival horror classics.

Definitely looking forward to giving this a spin.

-STEM NINJA APPROVED-

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GirlUSoCrazy

@videogameninja: I lean towards more action than Amnesia but I loved P.T. which was almost totally passive. RE7's demo seemed like more of that, and I was happily surprised with how the game handled action.

Evil Within is a great blend of atmospheric settings and build-up with what I felt was fun combat, and the various quirky set pieces broke things up as well. I loved the tension in that busted house with "The Keeper" (safe-head guy).

It had some nice touches I appreciated, such as the safe room music and looking in the mirror to transfer to other places, choosing how to use your keys for bonus items and how to upgrade your character, I liked the creepy NPCs as well. It's inspired for sure. I could look past the cheesiness and clichés and I was into all of it up until the last stage which was weird stealth stuff, but that was a minor hitch. I like weird stories with new concepts, I'll take that over something playing it safe.

It was underrated and underappreciated, I hope this one does well! As a fan of the first I can't wait to get my hands on 2.

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Lemonsway

Calling this Survival Horror is the same as calling DMC Survival Horror. SMH. It's Action Horror, Action in a Horror setting. Just because it's Horror it doesn't automatically mean it's Survival Horror.

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Kyrylo

@lemonsway: you never played it, do you?

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santinegrete

@lemonsway: like The Suffering right? your DMC analogy is a far-fetched but your argument is correct. At least you didn't put along the cocky conclussion of "this isn't horror because it does not scare me".

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Lemonsway

@santinegrete DMC has some aspects connected to horror even though yes it a stretched comparison in terms of genre. It is horror, i'd say it relies more on physical horror wich by the current times isn't that scary anymore and people are still more into psychological horror because it has another layer of creativity. Physical horror is just more gross than scary and by now with so manny Zombie movies and tv shows, zombies aren't scary anymore, they're an overused type character, they are cannon fodder just like Nazi's lol and by extentension anything that is a strange body falls into the meh it's not that scary just like the zombies.

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Gelugon_baat

@lemonsway: Sebastian is hardly like Dante. He doesn't have infinite bullets for one, and he's still a frail human even though he's in make-believe land.

This is a survival game, mainly because it has management of scarce resources.

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Lemonsway

@Gelugon_baat Resources in DMC are scarce aswell, you don't have health stars or devil stars splattered across everywhere, sure Dante has infinite bullets and is unkillable as far as we know but that's that doesn't really matter and it would only help my argument. The point is both worlds are "invaded" by demons/monsters, both have you collect resources, weapons, items, upgrade materials, all of the exploration tropes are present in both, what is different is the tone of the story and the setting, where DMC is clearly just fantasy and to let you go out in style The Evil Within tries it's best to scare you but even in that tonal and setting difference you're doing the exact same thing, exploring, getting items, weapons, upgrading, shooting, stabbing. It's just that you're in a more horror setting rather than a fantasy one and you have sneaking around, that doesn't mean it's SURVIVAL HORROR, like i said it's Action Horror. It's like Bloodborne, for all of the Cosmic Horror lore in Bloodborne you're still kicking assand the same happens in The Evil Within, you're still kicking ass even jsut as a human wich is even more unbeliveable than being unkillable like Dante or reawakening in the Hunters Dream, so it only helps my argument of it being Action Horror because you're not simply trying to survive, you're fighting back and you can win, you will win but it's not because you survived it's because you can go 1v1 or 1vManny and win jsut like DMC or Bloodborne.

RE being SURVIVAL HORROR is the biggest misconception of all time, it was supposed to be an RPG remake of another game before it became the RE we know so the scarce resources isn't really a direct horror survival thing, it's just a trope, sure the same trope is present in real survival horror games but it's not a defining characteristic of the survival horror genre, TLoU has scarce resources and it's not horror survival despite it's apocalyptic setting. A game like RE1 that gives you rocket launchers, grenade launchers, shotguns, grenades and all of that is a survival game? How does that make sense? You can fight anything and win, when you can fight and win then it's not about survival, you can however go through the game without killing things wich makes survival hard yes but it doesn't change the game from being action oriented wich is why all those weapons are in the game. If it wanted to be a survival game it wouldnt give you any weapons and would force you to not have combat or the combat would be way too hard so that it would keep the element of "you can't beat them". That would be Survival. you are not there to escape the Mansion, you are there to investigate it and they swent an ARMED TEAM to do so, can there be surival horror stories with armed teams? Sure if their weapons are innefective then it doesnt matter what they have but that's not the case with RE. For RE to be Survival it would ahve to make you avoid the enemy, to not give you means to win or only means to temporarily avoid danger but RE ever since RE1 made you able to fight against and win, easily even, it wasn't RE4 that changed RE, RE as it exists since RE1 is an ACTION HORROR game not Survival that's the misconception, the concept of survival horror in gaming might have originated with RE but it doesnt mean that RE is survival horror, not everything that originates something is the something it originates, a falling apple didnt originate physics, it simply gave a new perspective, thats what RE did it gave a new perspective, it didn't create a whole new genre, but people don't want to discuss that because they feel it removes any validity from RE, wich yes in this case it would because it would be considered a different genre and people don't want to discuss that because of the benefits that misconception gave to the gaming world. It's an honest mistake that's all, but it's still a mistake that is made today when it doesn't make sense to make that mistake today, if RE is Survival Horror then verything like RE is Survival horror so what is Action horror? Is Action Horror only things like Bloodborne?

Can you understand better now why i used DMC?

And this discussion also applies to something like Alien and Aliens, the first one Alien is a horror movie while the second Aliens isn't a horror movie, that's just how it is, Aliens is so much more combat oriented that it simply puts the horror in the back while Alien has all it's focus on the horror of a killing organism terrorising an entire ship and it's crew. Ripley didn't had any means to fight the Xeno in Alien BUT in Aliens she arms herself, makes a flamethrower manchine gun and fights the Xenomorph Queen, that isn't horror and it's the exact same parallel between RE and a true Survival Horror game, like Alien Isolation tried to do, you can't kill the Xeno, you can only escape it momentarily and yet you still have weapons in Alien Isolation, that's why Alien Isolation is more comparable to survival horror than RE will ever be. AI tells you, you can't beat it, you wont beat it by shooting it, you can only slow it down and escape it momentarily. Tell me one thing you can't kill in RE that makes survival the only option?

When Arnold fights the Predator it isn't survival it's 1v1, it can be killed, wich can be perceived as survival sure but it's not the objective Arnold had, he wanted to kill it not survive it. Same thing with Ripley in Aliens, she wanted to fight and kill the Xenomorph Queen and not just survive it, survive it's what she did in Alien, where with basicly no resources she managed to outsmart and escape death. both Arnold vs the Predator and Ripley vs the Xeno Queen are action sequences and not horror or survival sequences.

Just because it's a horror setting it doesn't mean it's only about survival or that survival is the only objective. the means by wich you survive have to be taken into account and even if resources are scarce it doesnt mean it's about survival, the resources being scarce could be just the way to make the game more challenging and difficult rather than being the sole focus on survival. Therefore even if resources in RE are scarse there's still plenty of weapons to use to dispose of zombies and other monsters. Therefore it's action horror not survival, you're there to investigate not survive, survival jsut ends up being the result of your actions. It's a consequence of RE not what RE is all about wich would invalidate the coinning of the Survival Horror classification of RE. And further prove that coinning something does not make you the thing is that after RE coinned the term manny other games MADE BEFORE RE were now included in the Survival Horror genre/sub-genre. So even if it coinned the term, wrongly, it wasn't the first game that could/should have coinned the term.

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Gelugon_baat

@lemonsway: I don't think it helps your argument, because there are more than just the things that I mentioned.

For example, there's the matter of stealth gameplay. DmC doesn't have that.

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Lemonsway

@Gelugon_baat stealth isn't a survival aspect only, MGS and Splinter Cell have stealth and they are not about survival. Stealth and Item Management are not things that can be singled out to the Horror genre or the Survival Horror sub-genre. They are very important aspects in the sub-genre but they are not unique to it. Just because you have those two mechanics in a game doesn't mean they are X genre/sub-genre. Even having those two in a genre can lead to sub-genres like Survival Horror and Action Horror, so those two mechanics don't define a game in terms of it's genre/sub-genre. So again it's only helping my argument. If DMC had stealth then it would still be the same genre, if God of War had stealth it would still be God of War and still be the same genre it is.

I'll go further, the static camera angles and tank controls of RE are not exclusive mechanics of Survival Horror either, they could simply be limitations of the time or they could be intentional limitations wich doesn't matter really because it makes the game a bit more challenging either way BUT challenging and Survival are not the same, Survival is Challenging yes but challenging is not only associated with Survival, Action games can be challenging, DMC3 when it first came out had it's Normal difficulty to actually be the Hard difficulty and it was very challenging so they had to come out with the Special Edition of DMC3 to fix that issue because we couldn't just download patches back then and they added Vergil as a character for compensation, so nope making a game challenging doesn't mean you're into Survival territory. So if these 4 mechanics don't necessarilly make a game about Survival then can RE1 be considered Survival Horror? It's setting works as an Action Horror game like i'm saying, the gameplay mechanics don't make much of a difference either, it only makes it harder, more challenging but that itself isn't transforming it into Survival Horror rather than Action Horror, so what exactly makes RE1 Survival Horror to begin with? What makes The Evil Within Survival Horror? Are there unkillable enemies? Is escaping your only option? Are you told consciously or unconsciously that avoiding the enemy is prefered to fighting it? While having chase sequences, hidding sequences and others alike are more into surviving the encounter you still have the rest of the game to account to so why say it is survival Horror and when in fact it should jsut be said HORROR, it's in both fronts, Action and Survival so you can't single one and ignore the other and also it's physical and psychological horror, another 2 sub-genre's, so in general it's just Horror, it has elements from both groups of sub-genre's. It can't be just Survival Horror or just Action Horror jsut like it can't be just Psychological Horror.

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Gelugon_baat

@lemonsway: I don't think that it is a horror game. Do note that one of my previous posts said that I believe that it is a "survival game".

I do realize that there isn't any set of unanimously-agreed rules that define what is a "survival game". It's at best just a phrase that is only true in the eyes of whoever who believes that it should be this and that.

That said, despite your arguments, I still believe that this game's blend of gameplay makes it a survival game.

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RSM-HQ

@lemonsway: Very wrong.

I'm playing it right now, it's Survival Horror, to it's kin Silent Hill and Umbrella Resi games.

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juxax

Im loving the sound of the classic difficulty, no auto saves and only 7 saves per playthrough, gunna have to scour the first few areas for keys! can't wait for this

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HouseAlwaysWins

Looks very lame.

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arnna

@housealwayswins: congratulations. Feel better?

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HouseAlwaysWins

@arnna: yup.

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Wasn't keen on the first, just couldn't get into it. But it does seem to be improved. Maybe get it a bit further down the line.

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@graffitiheart: Same, couldn't get into the first game and never finished it. It was a decent enough game, just seemed like gore for the sake of gore to me. Not much reasoning behind it all. Though on release the black bars and limited field of view didn't help matters and put me off the game from the start. I know they removed them later, thank goodness.

This does seem like an improvement though, so not sure if it is worth a punt or not?

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juxax

@graffitiheart: evil within was a good, good game. but the problem with it was, difficulty curve and disjointed story, seemingly throwing u from one chapter to the next without rhyme or reason, also people found the artistic style of enemies off putting, some boss fights required a certain amount of trial and error, but once you studied the game a bit, find all the keys to the lockers, you can reroll lockers and reload save games to find gel and decent amounts of ammo and turn it into a shooting gallery of a game, or play it on hardest difficulty and it was even better. blowing chunks of head off the enemies still looked better in the first then any other game.

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RaveNRolla

Will play this tonight!! I'm really excited!

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WitcherRalph617

Good, I am sick of all these "running and hiding" horror games.

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RSM-HQ

@witcherralph617: They should be called Stealth Horror or something, getting fed up with people saying they're Survival Horror when being negative about games like this.

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santinegrete

@witcherralph617: they're nice experiments, but the gameplay of Amnesia succesors fail to grip my interest. Thumbs up.

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EdwardNygma

@witcherralph617: Me too.

The Evil Within 2 More Info

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  • First Released Oct 12, 2017
    released
    • PC
    • PlayStation 4
    • Xbox One
    Tango Gameworks returns with the sequel to The Evil Within, a pulse-pounding maze of nightmares mixed in with gorgeous, memorable settings.
    8.6
    Average Rating132 Rating(s)
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    Developed by:
    Tango Gameworks
    Published by:
    Bethesda Softworks
    Genre(s):
    Action, Adventure, Survival, 3D
    Content is generally suitable for ages 17 and up. May contain intense violence, blood and gore, sexual content and/or strong language.
    Mature
    Blood and Gore, Intense Violence, Partial Nudity, Strong Language