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Review

The Evil Within 2 Review

  • First Released Oct 12, 2017
    released
  • Reviewed Oct 12, 2017
  • PC
  • XONE
  • PS4

Dead by dawn

Innovating within the bounds of horror's familiar tropes and rules is a difficult task, but one that The Evil Within 2 handles with grace. Developer Tango Gameworks cleverly introduces old-school horror design within the confines of a semi-open world that ultimately makes for a refreshing trip into a world of nightmares.

Picking up several years after the first game, we find the former detective Sebastian Castellanos in dire straits, still wracked with guilt over the loss of his family and haunted by his last visit into a nightmare version of reality. When a shadowy organization gives him the chance to set things right with his past and rescue his daughter from the dangerous and unstable world of Union, he willingly re-enters the haunting realm despite his residual trauma.

Right from the beginning, there's a sense of deja vu as Sebastian wanders the eerie and unreal locations in Union. Despite being one of the few survivors from the first game, he oddly finds himself falling for the same tricks and set-ups that the world and its inhabitants lay out for him. While this could be chalked up to a simple retread, much of these instances make a point of illustrating some key differences from this game and the last.

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There's generally more of an adventurous feel compared to the original's isolated levels. With more side characters to interact with--opening up moments of dialogue that flesh out the story--and optional events scattered around the world, there's a level of freedom and variety in The Evil Within 2 that was largely absent from the first game. However, there are a few notable sections where backtracking is required, which slows the pacing and sense of progression to a crawl.

Despite this, exploration is consistently enjoyable, rewarding treks to the places tucked away, where you can find details about Union's history and meet other characters looking to survive the nightmare. With so many little details that add a lot to atmosphere, there's a clear respect for The Evil Within's world. The many nods to original game feel more impactful for it, giving a renewed appreciation for Sebastian's previous adventure.

Compared to its predecessor's singular levels in unique chapters, The Evil Within 2 possesses a more organic and interconnected set of places to explore--focusing on several large maps with multiple points of interest. While there's still plenty of mind-bending and perspective-skewing set pieces, such as a tentacle creature with a large camera for an eye, the explorable spaces are the real standout. In many ways, it's like traversing through a demented amusement park filled with hideous creations, forcing yourself to face past horrors. Adventuring to places not marked on the map often yields valuable resources, and also leads to some surprising encounters with obsessive ghosts and multiple unnerving, fourth-wall breaking events.

It takes more than just going for the head to take out some of the tougher enemies.
It takes more than just going for the head to take out some of the tougher enemies.

Over time, environments descend into chaos when Union inevitably grows unstable, turning a small town into a horrifying and unnerving shell of its former self. Streets vertically upend, and fire and blood exude from places they shouldn't. The visual design of The Evil Within 2 successfully juxtaposes vastly different settings and aesthetics, and presents them in a bizarre package that illustrates the erratic and unpredictable nature of the world.

While Sebastian felt more like a mere sketch of a hardened and weary protagonist in his first outing, he feels better realized and more grounded in this sequel, giving a certain gravitas to his struggle. Showing bewilderment and confusion throughout the first game, he's more confident and determined this time, even throwing in some fitting one-liners that poke fun at some of the dangers in the last game. The supporting cast of villains also feel more active in the ongoing events, and have a greater sense of place this time around--particularly with the eccentric serial killer artist who photographs his victims upon their deaths.

The Evil Within 2 successfully juxtaposes vastly different settings and aesthetics, and presents them in a bizarre package that illustrates the erratic and unpredictable nature of the world.

While there's occasional moments of cheese and humor throughout--such as the inclusion of a goofy shooting range and collectible toys related to other Bethesda games--the levity never feels out of place, which is an accomplishment considering the game's pervasive macabre atmosphere.

Putting a greater emphasis on the survival aspect of survival horror, The Evil Within 2 demands resource management and bravery in its relatively spacious world. While common enemies are fewer in number compared to the original game, they're far more threatening alone and can easily manhandle Sebastian. There's a thoughtful approach to engagement and progression this time around, which means you'll have to think twice about whether or not to engage a group of enemies. With that said, you have a sizable arsenal of weapons and gear--including the return of the Crossbow with six different ammo types--to take on the enemies as you see fit.

Some encounters will pull out all the stops to prevent Sebastian from making progress.
Some encounters will pull out all the stops to prevent Sebastian from making progress.

Throughout his journey, Sebastian carries a communication device, allowing him to keep track of main objectives, along with points of interest and intel on the fates of side characters in the area. How you go about dealing with these characters and exploring is up to you. Similarly, whether you avoid conflict with enemies or take out as many as possible along the way is down to your preferred playstyle. The Evil Within 2 accommodates those that prefer action as much as those that like to be stealthy. Combat is robust, thanks to improved weapon handling and character upgrading that allows you to focus on the specific areas of Sebastian's skillset to enhance stealth, combat, and athleticism.

Sebastian can return to the safe haven of his mind to upgrade weapons and skills, and review case files and intel on various characters. With the Green Gel collected from fallen enemies--and the new Red Gel that unlocks upper tier upgrades--the core upgrading system has been greatly improved. Going beyond simply increasing damage of melee strikes and stamina length, new special perks can be unlocked such as the ever-useful Bottle Break skill that uses bottles as self-defense items when grabbed by enemies. Along with the expanded weapon upgrade system, using only weapon parts, the systems of progression feel far more nuanced and open.

Sebastian will have to scavenge for supplies and other materials to make up for the lack of ammo boxes and health items. While this may seem like it can make things easy, efficient crafting can only be done at dedicated workbenches, whereas crafting in the field via the radial inventory menu should be done a last resort as it costs twice as many materials. This crafting element adds a bit of a survivalist feel to The Evil Within 2, where you're scrounging around corners to find materials, all while avoiding packs of enemies looking to pummel you.

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Though the game is challenging even on its standard difficulty level, it's not unfair, and there are options for multiple playstyles. The standard Survival difficulty mode is manageable, and you won't find yourself hitting a way due to lack of resources. However, the Nightmare mode raises the stakes, featuring slightly altered combat encounters, harder enemies, and fewer resources to find. If you're up for a challenge of a different kind, the unlockable Classic mode will disable auto-saves, upgrades, and limit you to a finite amount of saves. In addition to extra unlockables for completing the tougher difficulties, the experiences they offer is more in keeping with the true survival horror experience, where resources are hard to come by, and the enemies are deadlier than before.

There's a clear respect for the horror genre in The Evil Within 2, with a number of references to classic films and games. The game channels that style and tone into combat that feels brutal and raw, stealth that has an air of suspense, and unsettling confrontations with dangerous, otherworldly creatures. The Evil Within 2 doubles down on the core of what makes survival horror games great: the focus on disempowerment and obstacles, and the ensuing satisfaction that comes with surviving a harrowing assault.

Though there's some occasional technical hiccups that result in some particularly frustrating moments and weird pacing issues, this horror sequel elevates the tense and impactful survival horror experience in ways that feel fresh and exciting. What this cerebral horror game does isn't totally new, but it rarely feels routine, and offers plenty of surprises. Coming in at a lengthy and surprisingly packed 15-hour campaign, the sequel does an admirable job of ratcheting up the tension and scares when it needs to, while also giving you the freedom to explore and proceed how you want. It's a tough thing to balance, but The Evil Within 2 does it remarkably well, and in a way that leaves a strong and lasting impression after its touching conclusion.

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The Good
Haunting and macabre atmosphere that pulls you into the lead character's struggle
Varied and inventive level design that switches things up considerably
Improved upgrading and weapon system that allows for more customization based on player choice
Solid storytelling and improved narrative that conveys a complex and touching narrative
The Bad
Weird pacing issues and inconsistencies across some chapters, and backtracking can be a drag
8
Great
About GameSpot's Reviews

About the Author

Alessandro enjoys survival horror games and thinks the Resident Evil remake is one of the best games ever made. While he found the original Evil Within to be mostly entertaining, he was very surprised at how much of an improvement the sequel is. Bethesda provided a complimentary PS4 copy of the game for the purposes of this review, with other members of staff playing the PC and Xbox One versions.
255 Comments  RefreshSorted By 
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Avatar image for Kyrylo
Kyrylo

I played up to the third chapter and honestly it all I ever wanted from horror game. It completely washed sour aftertaste from RE7 from my mouth. I hope TEW gets another sequel, because RE went complete crap road.

Avatar image for deactivated-5a03c1b04304d

@Kyrylo: RE7 is close to a masterpiece dude. Play that s*** in VR and you'll sing a different tune.

Avatar image for gameroutlawzz
GamerOuTLaWzz

@Kyrylo: except RE7 is one of the greatest survival horror games released in a long time.

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santinegrete

@gameroutlawzz: have you played this too? Wich one you liked most?

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juxax

@santinegrete: re7 was cinematically great, I enjoyed it, but it felt like half a game, it should have taken a turn and introduced new villains and enemies instead of end credits, it just felt half finished, whereas im starting chapter 7 on tew2 with 15 hrs on clock, on nightmare and it's hard, and really fun.

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NTM23

@santinegrete: Both are good. I think RE7 is a little better so far, but I am really enjoying Nightmare mode on TEW2 on the second playthrough.

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santinegrete

@NTM23: did you carry what you unlocked in new game+? or it's a new game altogheter?

I tried Nightmare in the first try because of the advice on the screen, and it's name it's appropiate. Encounters fill you with dread.

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NTM23

@santinegrete: Hey, just wanted to report that I am now playing it again and found something interesting. I went back out and am now stealthily killing everything to get all the green gel or what have you. I don't know how it activated it, but when you get to the safe house on the farthest north of the map, the one that has access to the marrow, I came upon a humongous crow standing in the back of the building. I was running away from an enemy and all of a sudden this huge crow was standing in front of me. I thought it was a glitch, but I killed the crow and it gave me 20000 green gel.

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santinegrete

@NTM23: OH MY GOD. Gonna search for it :D

Avatar image for NTM23
NTM23

@santinegrete: I beat the game on Casual first, and yes you carry everything you did from the previous playthrough. That means weapons, their upgrades, your skill upgrades, as well as collectibles. That said, it doesn't carry over from difficulty. So you can't beat it on easy, then play hard with the stuff from your easy playthrough. So yes, I had to start over fresh.

I've been playing on Nightmare for about seven hours so far, and to be honest, it's good, but it's not that tense still (it is compared to Casual difficulty of course, though) and even compared to the first game, you upgrade relatively fast, at least in the things you want to upgrade in.

I stopped just before leaving the first open town area. The biggest issue in terms of difficulty, and will be throughout the game is the amount of ammo you have. I don't have enough ammo to kill all the enemies that come out after a while, especially the tougher guys that won't allow for stealth, so I pretty much have to move on unless I want to take the time to stealth kill everyone to gain green gel and powder for ammo for the tough guys.

It's actually not that difficult, and after a while, getting used to it all, it's pretty predictable as to how to play. I like it nonetheless. I actually stopped playing it for now since I randomly started playing Super Mario 64 (which I've had since release, but never actually beat), and I'm kind of hooked on it. Since Odyssey is almost out, I might as well go through it.

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GamerOuTLaWzz

@santinegrete: sadly no, not yet.

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Kyrylo

@gameroutlawzz: Except RE7 is simple copy paste of several horror games and has more in common with walking simulator like Outlast than with real survival game. Re7 has laughable villains, terrible enemy design and 2,5 boss fights non of which were good. In the end, RE7 offers less content than original RE and feels like student project than AAA game.

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RSM-HQ

@Kyrylo: Only the opening hour remotely resembles games like Outlast, the rest is a true Resident Evil game with just a terrible FP perspective. Even down to the level design.

It has the item combination mechanics from Nemesis, the hording bosses from 2 and Nemesis, the item boxes from all the classic games, and the quick turn,

I don't know how you get the idea it's a walking simulator. My guess is you've only played the demo and talk a lot of garbage.

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NTM23

@RSM-HQ: Totally disagree about the first person statement. I love that approach.

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RSM-HQ

@NTM23: I'll explain why I don't enjoy the perspective for Survival Horror games like this-

I'm not against First Person perspective, but when the level design is branching paths in linear hallways and corridors FP doesn't work. Never has. FP is suited towards more open maps, and that's also why outside of stealth/ walking simulators you won't find many Horror games use FP perspective. comes across as clunky and limited. Maps should be cramped and isolated but not at the cost of awareness.

With that, I already know the reason was to sell on the VR trend. And even then, one negative on a still otherwise great game has me little to complain about. . other than that opening hour and maybe the boat Resi 7 is a great game. And excited for the DLC.

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NTM23

@RSM-HQ: I still disagree with that statement. I like it enough that I hope to see more of it in the future, and wouldn't mind if they modeled a remake of an older RE in the same way. The game is not meant to feel like a fast-paced Call of Duty shooter. It feels more weighty (as opposed to 'clunky'), and I think it works and feels wonderful. I also loved both those moments you're talking about.

The ship part was a nice surprise where it really starts revealing how it connects to the overall universe. My biggest complaint about RE7 is just that it can be finished in under four hours if you attempt it, but that said it's a negligible thing since, at least to me, it feels like you cover a lot of ground in the nine hours of playtime. Lastly, it doesn't matter what perspective it's in, a genre can be effective either way as long as it's well made.

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RSM-HQ

@NTM23: "I still disagree with that statement. I like it enough that I hope to see more of it in the future, and wouldn't mind if they modelled a remake of an older RE in the same way"

And that's fine, just stating my opinion on the matter. As for a 'remake' in FP. . . I personally hope not lol. That doesn't come across a very faithful, but if you had an option to go in FP view? I'm ok with that, but would admit, wouldn't ever use it for a Resi game haha.

"The game is not meant to feel like a fast-paced Call of Duty shooter"

I think you're misunderstood what I put. the perspective doesn't fit Resident Evils gameplay, and Resident Evil 7 very much plays like a Resident Evil game. Successful FP games are built on more expansive map designs that use the perspective to its advantage. In cramped in areas it's a disadvantage, and makes combat encounters more a hassle than they would have been in third person.

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NTM23

@RSM-HQ: The point about Call of Duty was referring to you talking about it feeling clunky. I think your point about it being cramped is the reason why it works so well. To add to that, almost all the way throughout, the game is pretty dark too, especially late in the game where you can't see too far ahead of you. To me, it works to make a more foreboding, tense experience. I thought it worked perfectly well in the first person and wouldn't want it any other way since I had experienced it. I had no issue with the combat nor exploration of the house. To me, a remake doesn't need to play the same way exactly as the original, it just needs to give the experience of that setting and that story. RE7's style would work well in my opinion, for any of the previous RE's honestly, from the original more survival to the more action-oriented.

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Jcb9dwn

I've been playing for hours and while it started in a strong, surreal note, so far I've experienced:

1. Being locked out of my own preorder bonuses for not downloading them immediately after installing the game.

2. Boring, samey and generic enemies that are all basically "fast male zombie", "fast female zombie", "chunky mutated zombie", and "zombie wielding a hatchet" as well as "zombie who repeatedly pulls molotov out of ass". While many of the main enemies had stylish visual cues that differentiated them in sadistically creative ways, all of the basic enemies so far look and fight pretty much the same way. No enemies covered in glass shards, wrapped in barbed wire, or impaled on javelins yet like in the original... just generic mutated zombies. Their player executions are astonishingly lame. The primary one being a zombie clipping its arms through the player character on the ground as blood splashes cover the clipping. No actual guts or visible mutilation. No detail on the brutality like with Laura's killmove or with various normal enemies in the original.

3. Sometimes their heads burst into a parasite like in every newish Resident Evil game ever and you have to kill them again.

4. Stealth is basically a shitty pointless strategy until you get perks for it. Enemies love to suddenly turn around for no reason and they'll often sense you miles away behind a crate. Stealth without perks in this game is even worse than Skyrim, where I found stealth useful even without the perks. Most other perks are basically variations of "Health or stamina go up x%".

5. The side quests are mildly interesting, but their stories are so far only marginally more interesting than Skyrim's generic "radiant" quests. Imagine if Skyrim only autosaved and you could only go to the last autosave while doing side quests. Now imagine them taking much longer because small tasks are super spread out to create the illusion of vastness.

6. "Collecting loot" in a "survival horror" game is as tedious and immersion-breaking as you can imagine it would be, in this game at least.

7. The game is very bloody, but with the exception of one stylish brain splatter in slow-mo, this game feels surprisingly "tamer" than the first one seemed to be. Corpses littered about usually look so generic and out of place that it's almost uncanny (in a bad way) and there is very little of the sadistic aesthetic. One creative exception would be the hanging sheet covered bodies with blood dribbling down their legs, but that was a rare exception and it seemed to exist more to be shown off for promotion/marketing puroses than anything. Most of the other bodies and creepy stuff are rather samey and lame.

8. The awful muddy textures in cutscenes when the camera frame changes are back in full-force on a modern console game and the game doesn't even look a whole lot better graphically than the first. Also chapter 3 has a lot of shallow references to Silent Hill and there's fog everywhere in the "quaint little town of Unity". They could learn a lot from Team Silent as the fog in that 90's gane was meant to cover up technical limitations. In Evil Within 2 it is common for things less than a dozen feet away to suddenly pop into existence in front of you as the gane loads. The fog in Evil Within 2 is thin and much of the backdrop can be seen suddenly appearing as it loads. If they somehow could work that into the "STEM is a virtual reality" angle that would've been cool but sadly the designers don't seem to possess that sort of creativity and it just looks like an ugly mess like in Bethesda's open world games.

Overall I feel like the loot sidequests are basically Bethesda's same old tried-and-true tactic of "the illusion of vastness" and "content over quality".

I haven't played past chapter three, but it is so far a lame time-sponge taking way too much inspiration from Skyrim's mechanics and making it aesthetically less interesting than the original game, at least as far as the enemies are concerned. Also cheap artificial difficulty deaths. Not to say the game is hard as the enemies are super predictable, but the gameplay totally holds your hand and I know that the same encounters will be much more smooth after I grind off of RESPAWNING enemies and get a couple more perks. Also, the game depletes your resources after you're killed and has limited respawns (unlike the enemies) for ammo and resources.

Hopefully the story will produce but the sidequests are extremely disappointing and I would prefer if survival horror didn't go the route of mindless WoW and Diablo 3 grind-fests.

I actually bothered to buy a warranty for this game because that's how little I trust Bethesda at this point. I'm hoping it will pick up but at this point I think I may have to say this game was defective or something. Gamebreaking bugs have already been reported so it wouldn't surprise me.

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RaveNRolla

@jcb9dwn: can you elaborate on point #1? i haven't tried the code yet, because i usually beat a new game before i download any bonuses. what exactly does it say?

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Jcb9dwn

@RaveNRolla: If you want to replay the gane with the preorder DLC stuff you'll be fine. I'm assuming (hoping) they'll have a NG+ mode since that was a really great feature in the first game.

I played well into Chapter 3 and spent a good chunk of time on it. I think they give you a weapon and explain the crafting system in Chapter 2 but it isn't truly utilized until a little ways into 3 I felt like.

Anyways I had been playing for hours and hours, had fixed the Sniper Rifle and had started getting a feel for the weapons I liked, so I figured I would broaden my options a little and figure out how to get my preorder DLC.

I entered the code on my Gamestop receipt and downloaded it. Then I saved and restarted my game.

I'm greeted with a message that tells me I will recieve my preorder gear after completing chapter 2, but since I had already completed chapter two AND did a lot of side objectives in chapter three, I had to choose between waiting for a ng+ that they hopefully have, or COMPLETELY STARTING OVER THE GAME. I opted not to start over, I felt awful thinking about replaying that whole burning house sequence over again and skipping through tons of cutscenes, just to access content that I went out of my way to get by preordering to begin with.

This is just one of the many, many design flaws the game has, technically speaking. The enemy feedback is hilariously bad. If the "so-bad-it's-good" concept from movies could take game form, it would take the form of this game.

I'm actually weirdly entertained because enemy feedback is just THAT bad sonetimes, it actually makes me laugh my ass off. I once swung a knife at an enemy like three times in a row and it just stood there as my weapon clipped through it doing no apparent damage or making any sound at all)

The game is fun now and I'm enjoying it and it eventually picks up like 10 chapters in, so if you like weird Silent Hillish stuff and are willing to wade through an ocean of boring, samey zombies that all have pretty much the same character models and attack animations, it can be kind of rewarding in a superficial way. It's a "fun, guilty pleasure" type game, but it lacks intelligence and is totally out of Silent Hill's league. I appreciate that they like Silent Hill 2 ebough to reference it constantly, but I find it almost offensive that they copy Silent Hill so much when their plot is Basically a lame Scyfy Channel/Michael Bay movie in game form.

Surreal Horror =\= Psychological Horror

I know I'm going to sound pretentious for this, but they really aren't doing hardcore fans of those original games any favors since Silent Hill was steeped in philosophy and metaphor, and dealt with mature, serious themes with realism and without a ton of goofy jokes thrown in. Team Silent also handled their surrealism in ways that were subtle, almost hypnotic. Silent Hill didn't need collosal floating objects to show how bizzare and messed up the town was. It just kind of slowly crept up on you, with all the sort of qualities of a fever dream. A good example of this would be towards the end of Silent Hill 2, where you're in the lakeview hotel and all of the doors into hotel rooms just lead back out of each other. Unless you're actively looking at the map, there is a good chance you will have no idea what the hell the game is even doing to you, making something as simple as walking through doors and looking at the map into a creepy, nerve-wracking riddle.

It was right around the time I was ten years old that I started playing the Silent Hill games, only a few months after my father died in a motorcycle accident.

Most of my family were cruel and callous, but not him. To this day some of my family members try to get under my skin by mocking my dead father. My mom dated a drug dealer who built a meth lab in our garage. He drank and was controlling and often ridiculed and gaslighted me. The meth lab even burned down a large part of the garage once because he was stupid enough to leave bullets near open flame or something to that effect. Other family members tell me that I apparently saw him pick my mom up and smash the dinner table by throwing her down on it, but I have no memory of this. Still, the scenes in Resident Evil 7 involving tables being smashed and garbage being everywhere and general family dysfunction really got to me. By that age I can honestly say that my fathef was the only person I had truly loved, and then he was gone.

I played through the entirety of Silent Hill 2 in a single night in a broken down mobile home by the house via an extension cord. That night was like a spiritual awakening for me.

As I began the game, the daylight had only just begun to fade through the clouds. When I finished Brookhaven, it was pitch black outside just like it was while roaming the streets ingame, and as I finished the game, dawn had just broken. I listened to Mary's letter while silently crying to myself, the screen becoming a colored blur through the tears I fought to hold back.

The take-away for me was, that when you've lost someone you loved, the only thing left to do is move on. And it set the precedent for my belief that no matter how horrifying things got, the world could still be beautiful, if only for a little while.

Imagine that! Being a kid and alone in elementary school, with nobody to talk to about it and no way to possibly cope... I just sunk... I changed... I didn't understand or see it then, but I do now.

I have since become obsessed with the concepts of evil, guilt and sadism. It's been so many years and I have created a "Silent Hill" game of my own... I have all of the mechanics and ideas in place it's all on paper... I just want to recreate that experience again... I don't care about money or a franchise, I just want something that makes me feel again. Dolls and mannequins litter my studio apartment. I see something of myself in their listless gazes; faceless and dissassociative. I see something of an empty unforgiving world through the concepts of puppets, dolls, and mannequins. Empty effigies given form by their exterior stimulus, or simply following along.

The game is akin to pen and paper tabletop, but really the dice rolls are just variables and placeholders for how I visualize it would work as a videogame. I don't know how to write code, I'm not a game designer, but I do this for myself above all else.

Still, I have written so much and devoted so much to it that I feel like it would be a shame for it to all fall into obscurity. The pieces are all there, the concepts and ideas written... an algorithm that pays attention to what people are actively saying, and tailors what the players see and their unique monster encounters based on a number of interwoven descriptors. Another mechanic that molds two people's seperate psyches into a single monster or location, intertwining their psyches in the same way Angela's fire stairway, or her newspaper hall did. Or with Eddie and his meat freezer/football posters.

One of the "Nemesis/Pyramid Head" style monsters is called the "Wheel Man".

I know the pain is never really going to end. I don't know if I ever truly moved on or what I hope to achieve. I'm just stumbling around in the dark right now.

I'm not sure how I got to writing all of this. It was a bit of a blur. But I know I'd like to share my work/ideas with anyone who is interested. Eventually when I can put the disjointed writing together and organize everything I can begin working on a complete, concrete novel-like experience. As it is now it is as though I wrote a novels length of the details which I aspire to include in this project.

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RaveNRolla

@jcb9dwn: i said #1 ;) yeah as far as the preorder stuff is concerned i'm good. i beat the game wednesday, then used the code, booted up the game and it notified me of the goodies. the thing is beating nightmare unlocked (again) the brass knuckles and if they are anything like in the 1st game there's no need for any other weapons anymore for my ng+ run, which, to be honest, i find kinda stupid. i also really disliked the idea of the foam finger in Dead Space even though it was hilarious, but it made subsequent playthroughs so boring i couldn't progress more than 2 levels before i had to stop out of boredom. i imagine my 2nd playthrough of EW2 is gonna be a bit boring, although i still have almost half the locker keys to look for, plus 1 file and 1 resonance point.

even though i really enjoyed my 1st playthrough of EW2 i think the 1st was better overall. more variety in gameplay and environments, you got these really tense bits in the 1st game, like the cellar of the mansion or the Laura bossfight(s) and there were a lot more sequences where the game just dropped a bunch of enemies at your feet that you had to kill in order to proceed, where you had to think on you feet, which was a much needed change in pace to the stealth sections. in EW2 there is only one encounter i can remember where the game forces you to fight a group of enemies (somewhere in the marrow, when you have to wait for a door to open).

lastly i also would've preferred akumu over this new classic mode (i value upgrading my gear over surviving a hit), and i'm actually wondering why they didn't do both, since akumu is 99,9% nightmare mode with the only change that you die from one hit.

as far as your personal story goes, thx for sharing. you definitely have a thing for writing i suppose. though you are better off finding another forum for that, since most of the users of this site won't read a text as long as that. also i don't know anything about making a game, apart from the things i personally prefer in a game. i would start by believing the intelligence of the player, which too many nowadays games don't.

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RestatBonfire

@jcb9dwn: at least finish the game before you complain THAT much my lord

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therealmattheew

@jcb9dwn: if you played up to chapter 3 which take 25 minutes and wrote an essay bitching about the game, you are just a natural born complainer..

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Jcb9dwn

@therealmattheew: Yea i playe

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aeroldoes

Almost done with it and I gotta say it’s been an absolute joy to play lol some parts do drag but maybe I’m just biased since I love survival horror but definitely give it a shot if you loved re4 and the first evil within. It’s such a huge improvement from the first!

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Cherub1000

@aeroldoes: awesome! I enjoyed the first but I can't deny, I found it very disjointed, im hearing the sequel being a solid improvement from many people. Think I'll go pick this up later on!

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aeroldoes

@cherub1000: I actually need to go back and finish the first one lol loved the atmosphere and story but its technical flaws made it almost unplayable haha

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boodleout

Another 8 lol

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hs2lee

Great fucking commercial.

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skipper847

@hs2lee: I paused it and went straight to comments instead.

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mdinger

Is this game accessible/comprehensible for those didn't play the first one? Is it worth playing the first one before playing the sequel?

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RaveNRolla

@mdinger: to be able to understand what's happening in 2 you definitely need a huge endgame spoiler from the 1st game.

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Pffrbt

@mdinger: Look up a synopsis for the first game + its DLC. Its plot is largely incoherent and full of holes

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aeroldoes

@mdinger: I maybe got halfway through the first and could not finish it before the patch and came into this clueless story wise but still thoroughly enjoyed it and it’s a relatively easy story to follow.

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Gelugon_baat

@mdinger: I have said this before to another user, so I am going to copy-paste most of that here.

The sequel immediately shows the STEM contraption, has Kidman appear right in the intro scenes and has characters making references to "Beacon" (the locale in the first game). That's just the tip of the iceberg in the intro. The game later introduces returning characters whom Sebastian greets with little more than "You again?" exclamations.

If all that already has you wondering what the hell is going on, you might want to watch someone else play the first game, or at least read a synopsis.

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GamerOuTLaWzz

I bought the first game day 1 as well as the season pass back in 2015 and its still amongst some of the most memorable games Ive played in the past years (huge fan of survival horror games) and I REALLY want to play this one as well but damn I cant justify spending another 79.99+ taxes for a 1 and done playthrough after purchasing D2 last month for almost 100 bucks as well as a new controller since broken R2 triggers seems to be a rampant trend with DS4 controllers lately. All these reviews/comments are making me so damn impatient I doubt Ill hold off until the game goes on sale...

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ResuReggin

@gameroutlawzz: What's the $79.99 about? Is that a special edition of the game or are you some sad Aussie? Anyway, it's not like the PC version of the game isn't selling for around $35-40 on sites like G2A.

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GamerOuTLaWzz

@resureggin: Ehm those are the digital prices on the PSN store in CDN dollars.

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soul_starter

@gameroutlawzz: Season pass? What was that all about?

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Gelugon_baat

@soul_starter: Here. You play as the other characters in the first game's events.

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Gelugon_baat

@gameroutlawzz: You made a mistake purchasing Destiny 2.

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GamerOuTLaWzz

@Gelugon_baat: while I admit the game is short on content Ive still poured 40hrs+ into it so far and have no doubt Ill enjoy it even more once they drop the future expansions.

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Gelugon_baat

@gameroutlawzz: Did you buy the season pass for Destiny 2 then?

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GamerOuTLaWzz

@Gelugon_baat: Yeah.

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lorddaggeroff

Wall text, just gimme the number.

Oh 8, that's it not a 7, oh well it's reviewed buy a guy I guess.

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MashedBuddha

@lorddaggeroff:

Making sense left and right there. Solid logic all around. I'll by that for a dollar.

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lorddaggeroff

@MashedBuddha:

0.50c your welcome.

The Evil Within 2 More Info

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  • First Released Oct 12, 2017
    released
    • PC
    • PlayStation 4
    • Xbox One
    Tango Gameworks returns with the sequel to The Evil Within, a pulse-pounding maze of nightmares mixed in with gorgeous, memorable settings.
    8.6
    Average Rating132 Rating(s)
    Please Sign In to rate The Evil Within 2
    Developed by:
    Tango Gameworks
    Published by:
    Bethesda Softworks
    Genre(s):
    Adventure, Survival, 3D, Action
    Content is generally suitable for ages 17 and up. May contain intense violence, blood and gore, sexual content and/or strong language.
    Mature
    Blood and Gore, Intense Violence, Partial Nudity, Strong Language