Review

Kingdom Come: Deliverance Review: The Past Comes At You Fast

  • First Released Feb 13, 2018
    released
  • PC
  • XONE
  • PS4

Try to make history.

No matter how much a textbook, TV show, or video game strives to depict the reality of what life was like in ages past, the end result is usually sanitized. The medieval era is a great case in point. Think of this long-ago time today and you imagine noble knights, maidens fair, and fat kings waving around legs of lamb. In truth, the period was more about robbers knifing you in the streets, wenches plying their trade, and lords working you to death on their manors.

Kingdom Come: Deliverance is dirty. Filthy, in fact. This expansive RPG from indie developer Warhorse Studios ditches cliches for a brutal portrayal of the Middle Ages that wastes no time proving how difficult life was in the early 15th century. Every romanticized notion of the era is extinguished through storytelling and a setting that captures the unfairness of existing when life expectancy hovered around 30 years--if you were lucky. Aspects of the game can be a little too unforgiving even for this vicious era due to some overly exacting mechanics and a host of oversights that includes a torturous save system, but Kingdom Come: Deliverance is still a rewarding, one-of-a-kind game.

Granted, it delves into a part of history you probably know little if anything about. You play as Henry, the naive son of a blacksmith who has the misfortune of living in Skalitz, Bohemia in 1403, when the countryside erupted with violence due to the imprisonment of the rightful King Wenceslaus IV by his power-hungry brother Sigismund. After a pastoral medieval day of hitting on the local barmaid, playing pranks, and helping dad finish a sword for the local lord, your village is attacked by an army without warning. Faced with savage marauders, all Henry can do is watch in terror before fleeing for his life.

No Caption Provided

All of this adds up to a terrifying opening that serves as both a spectacular source of frustration (expect to die many times before successfully escaping Skalitz) and as a warning that Kingdom Come: Deliverance is not a typical fantasy RPG. There's no heroic swordplay here, no wizards casting fireballs, no clerics raising the dead, no orcs or dragons. This is the story of an actual civil war that raged across Bohemia in the first decade of the 15th century. Your part in it is that of a nobody struggling to survive in a land full of noblemen who couldn’t care less if you lived or died, and fellow peasants who would stab you in the back for a crust of bread.

Such a cruel atmosphere is actually what makes Kingdom Come: Deliverance so enthralling, supported by an incredible attention to detail. Built in CryEngine 3, the presentation brings the era to life, from the filth of muddy village streets to idyllic sylvan forests where you can hunt wild boar or relax while sunbeams and butterflies sparkle around you. Character faces are diverse, as are their costumes, which appear textbook-authentic whether you are looking at a nobleman in hose and puffy sleeves or a guardsman wearing a steel hat and a leather jerkin. The layering of armor results in some visual clipping and details being filled in abruptly as you approach NPCs, but these little blemishes are easily overlooked when you're immersed in the events occurring around you.

Voice acting and scripting is nicely evocative of the age, right down to the constant religious references that underline the importance of Christianity. There are some flaws here, most notably in the load times needed to start dialogue and the sometimes repetitive conversation options, but all of the important dialogue is presented brilliantly.

Looking after your clothing and taking semi-regular baths is also vital. Shown up at a lord’s manor house in rags stinking of the stable? Good luck if you have to ask a favor. Conversely, wandering around taverns wearing a shirt adorned with someone else’s blood can make you more fearsome. Almost every action here has a consequence.

Other dialogue idiosyncrasies include anachronistic modern swearing along with accents from seemingly every corner of the globe (many actors voicing the main characters hail from the U.K., but you encounter others with American and other inflections). Still, while this language creativity can be a little jarring, it mostly fits. Even the music contributes strongly to the mood, with such strong plucked strings and flutes that you almost expect Ian Anderson and the rest of Jethro Tull to prance out of the woods on occasion.

A codex actually tracks everything you discover during Henry’s adventures. These entries eventually turn into something of a medieval encyclopedia. Lengthy sections reveal extensive details about the struggle between Wenceslaus IV and Sigismund, the feudal system, hygiene, liturgy, prostitution, toilets, and much more. So if you want to find out more about the Western Schism in the Roman Catholic Church but don’t want to crack a textbook, this is your game.

Game systems further prop up the ambiance provided by the game's look, sound, and historical detail. Characters start work when the sun rises and head to bed when it sets. You must fit into this schedule, which also involves regular food and sleep to stay healthy and hearty. Time skips are possible, although even then you still have to wait a minute or two while the hours slowly tick by. Looking after your clothing and taking semi-regular baths is also vital. Shown up at a lord’s manor house in rags stinking of the stable? Good luck if you have to ask a favor. Conversely, wandering around taverns wearing a shirt adorned with someone else’s blood can make you more fearsome. Almost every action here has a consequence.

While an extensive statistic-and-skill system provides you with a tremendous number of ways to customize Henry as he explores 15th-century Bohemia, he's only as good as his collective experiences. So if you want to get better at firing a bow, you need to practice at the archery range or head into the forest and shoot wild game like rabbits. Want to buff your skills with a sword or mace? You need to head to the training yard or into the countryside to look for bandits and enemy soldiers.

With that said, you still level up, track four primary stats, and follow 17 skills that impact specific activities. Dozens of selectable perks attached to the individual skill categories afford even greater fine-tuning, in that you can pick all sorts of personality traits that govern everything from how much beer you can drink to how well you can stay on a horse, to improving charisma and speech through the power of literacy. There are no shortage of options when it comes to turning Henry into a wannabe noble and a scholar (or a thug and a thief).

Combat and movement controls also run true to the focus on realism. Instead of instantly turning into a warrior when you whip out a sword for the first time, Henry is a klutz at the start. You throw punches or swing a weapon with mouse or analog stick motions to dictate an attack trajectory. Ranged battles are similarly tough, due to a lack of a targeting reticle for your bow. Increasing stats and skills allow your combat abilities to gradually improve over time, but it doesn't seem that you can get anywhere close to the effortless abilities typically displayed in RPGs. Other actions such as riding a horse and picking locks can also be overly finickly. Yet as much as such activities can result in frustration (especially at the start of the game), the rigorous control scheme underlines the central theme that adventuring is not supposed to be easy for a village peasant with no experience of the wider world.

Progress is saved automatically after you sleep and at certain moments of play, but you can’t just sleep anywhere and saves aren’t made regularly enough during quests. And since you can get killed so easily here, you always feel at risk of losing time and momentum.

As a result, fighting has a steep learning curve. But it is one well worth scaling. Every battle in the game is nerve-wracking. The cold fact that you are not a majestic fantasy warrior means that you can be killed at any time. Taking on more than one opponent is incredibly risky, and engaging with three or more is simply futile. Armor adds a layer of tactical complexity, too. The game features a thorough suite of medieval armor and clothing options ranging from padded shirts to plate, but wearing it weighs you down and can block your vision (put on a full helmet and you see the world through a slit). Battling foes in armor also presents its own challenges. Take on a fully equipped enemy and you need to either target their openings with arrows, or switch to blunt weapons better at bashing metal-covered heads and shoulders than anything with an edge.

Despite these complexities, it's disappointing that combat lacks physicality. It’s clumsy enough that you never feel completely in control (although much of this is certainly intentional, to best depict Henry’s rookie status when it comes to waging war), and there are odd hesitations in the animation that remove you from the immediacy of battles. Melee scraps are rough-and-tumble brawls for the most part, where you try to beat the enemy down before you collapse of wounds or exhaustion. That said, you’re generally so grateful just to survive that you don’t care how good your victory looked.

Even though Kingdom Come: Deliverance is built similarly to a standard RPG like Skyrim, where you accept quests and follow map icons to their destinations, there are some key differences. The biggest is the way that adventures are built around the living world. So if you’re told to meet a nobleman at dawn, you better do it or he may well take off without you. This has some tremendous benefits. You really feel like you’re inhabiting a real world that continues on without you. Quests also nicely blend mundane medieval duties like hunting rabbits for food and taking on guard patrols with more involving jaunts like investigating a murder, partying with a priest, tripping with witches, and tracking down the bad guys to get some vengeance and earn respect from nobility.

Still, this approach makes for a lot of dicey moments. The game feels like a balancing act where everything could spin out of control at any moment if you miss a scheduled appointment to start a quest, or even worse, encounter a bug. Bugs sometimes prevent characters from appearing when they should, making you revisit locations to trigger quests, or revisiting old saves to get things back on track. Key characters and locations are also often not given precise locations. This adds to the sense of being a real person in a medieval landscape and not a gamer following an icon on a compass, but it also forces you to take on impromptu scavenger hunts and wander aimlessly through the extremely dangerous wilderness, where you can easily stumble into an enemy encampment or even an ambush staged by robbers.

Being able to save your location anywhere and at any time would have helped a lot of the above problems, but this isn't an option. Progress is saved automatically after you sleep and at certain moments of play, but you can’t just sleep anywhere and saves aren’t made regularly enough during quests. And since you can get killed so easily here, you always feel at risk of losing time and momentum. You can save manually with the use of “Saviour Schnapps,” but this concoction has to be purchased at a high cost (tough to manage early in the game) or brewed. Modders have already stepped in with a fix that adds the ability to save on demand on PC, although the developers need to officially add this feature (or at least a save-on-exit feature in case real life gets in the way and you need to stop playing the game quickly).Basically, the game needs a patch along with a fresh look at saving and a few other design elements to let its better qualities shine.

Even with these issues in mind, anyone who can appreciate the down-and-dirty nature of history should play Kingdom Come: Deliverance. It's an impressive and unflinching look at the medieval era that transports you inside the compelling story of a real person caught in the middle of a civil war. As such, this is one of those rare, memorable games that stays with you long after you stop playing. While quirks and bugs can certainly be frustrating, none of these issues interfere much with the unique and captivating nature of the overall experience.

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The Good

  • Incredible attention to historical detail
  • Extensive, lifelike quests
  • Strong storytelling and voice-acting brings Henry and his world to life
  • Impressively rendered world immerses you in the setting
  • Smartly relies on both stat growth and skill development

The Bad

  • Overly rigorous core mechanics can get in the way of your enjoyment
  • Bugs and glitches can unfairly halt progress
  • Frustrating save system

About the Author

Brett spent 40 hours (on PC) in the feudal pleasures and pitfalls of the Holy Roman Empire as depicted in Kingdom Come: Deliverance. Additional testing of the PS4 and Xbox One versions were handled by GameSpot staff. All versions were complimentary copies provided by the publisher.
359 Comments  RefreshSorted By 
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tOrchie

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I just started playing this, two-and-a-half years after release, and I'm loving it. They seem to have gotten most of the major bugs ironed out. The only major one I had was a flickering during cutscenes that seemed to go away after fiddling with video settings and restarting a few times. Other than that, it's been great. The combat is a pain, but I am slowly improving, and I haven't felt like I really need more saves than I get, once I adjusted to the fact I couldn't save infinitely. So as good as the core of this game was on release, it's even better now with technical issues bogging it down.

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sinistery

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Edited By sinistery

Here's the thing about the game, it's not a game. Its a medieval simulator. Its supposed to not be fun. Its not supposed to be easy. Life sucked back them. Fighting sucks. Dying sucks. So how do you make it fun, go get yourself a trainer, and enjoy the game with infinite health. Its worth it. If you try to get more than half way though without it, you will give up. The game forces you to give up. Fighting an armored enemy and having to stab him 50 times in the face just for him to go down is the definition of a bad game. But the developers try to make a point, and that point is "f*k you, you don't decide how we make a game".

As far as the bugs go, the quests have to be mostly done EXACTLY the way the devs intended, without any instructions. Which makes most side quests not even worth trying. Seriously, if someone asks you to find something, or to make something, immediately turn it down. Otherwise the next thing you will have to do is play the broken potion-making minigame, which fails if you dont press on something at the exact time, or try lockpicking, which is basically harder than it is in real life.

I think the developer went overboard with trying to make a Czech witcher 3, when they should have focused on making a Witcher 1 and 2 before they tackled something with such massive scale. Its not an issue of size, but of resources. You dont need to let people do everything possible, just make the general storyline playable, and then add the extra crap

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JejeBob

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Edited By JejeBob

Well, there is save on exit now, and adding a mod to save anytime is a breeze, I actually don’t use it and am satisfied with the save on exit thing. As to bugs, I’m about 60 hours in and so far the only major thing was my horse getting lost, but since I could get to all the stuff it carried I just bought a new one, rather than going back to a save.

All in all, to me, this is one of the best games in years. It has real challenge right from the start, which is refreshing compared to how games nowadays always have a super-easy mode that allows anyone to zip through anything - this feels much more like how games were when I was young and when telling someone you finished “Last Ninja” earned you massive respect. The combat system is difficult to master, yes, but it’s definitely more than a stumbling brawl once you get into it and it’s extremely satisfying when you’re starting to get how to do ripostes and combos - the latter are a really interesting mechanic where landing a combo let’s you do stuff like half-swording (grabbimg the blade tomdrive it through), striking with the pommel etc.

Other good aspects are the immersive feel of actually living in the world, including the scale of things where travel actually takes some time, the many places where attention to detail really makes a difference - even honing your sword is a minigame, and there are rewards for getting it right.

Negative aspects; yes, the save is clunky and there are some bugs, but on a more general scale a drawback is how you are somewhat deprived of freedom in wsome aspects of how the game goes. Yes, you can be a criminal and rob and even murder for profit, all very immersive with mechanics for witnesses, wanted-levels and much more. You can be a brute who never helps anyone outside of the chance of getting into a fight.. you can be a scholar, focused on knowledge if you want. But everything is still tied up aound your character, Henry, being a basically decent person and the main quest has you do generally good deeds. It can actually become quite hilarious when after a murdering spree, you go to do the mext part of the main questline where you need to investigate some crime. And no matter your actions, gear, outfit and whatnot, Henry is always a kinda akward, inexperienced boy who seems kinda timid and concerned about doing the right thing. Fully customizable characters can’t be in this game due to the reliance on the storyline, but it would be great if there were a couple of differen playable characters with their own story, all playing out im the same general context. Another thing to consider is that it takes a pretty decent rig to play really well and you cant afford to lose performance to beauty if you are ever to master combat. In fact, this game was what finally got me to get a new GPU.

All in all a great game if you want a challenge combined with the immersive medieval experience and have a decent amount of time to put into it I think you should really get this game.

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wrednajasobaka

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From video review: "...engaging with three or more is simply futile."

Not quite. Being horse archer makes it possible, provided of course you have room to maneuver. If you have decent bow, hitting lightly armored target 1-2 times is enough. For fighters with plate armor, you can hit legs and thighs to slow them down. If they get too close just gallop away, turn around and keep firing.

Using this technique I killed all bandits and Cumans from Pribyslawitz by myself, and what a battle that was.

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DEATH39PROOF

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I just want to know where the prostitutes are in this game and if there is a rotation mechanic with the analog stick to please her, thanks if anyone knows.

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Nightmare350

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game of the year

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Srydecka24

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Edited By Srydecka24

This game's getting a lot of flack for the lead creator being a colossal douche, and I'm glad to read something a bit more positive then Eurogamer and others suggesting that I pass on it out of principle, which is ridiculous. Ironically, this quote from Eurogamer solidifies my inevitable purchase (as soon as some kinks and save system are patched): "When Kingdom Come does succeed, it's peerless. The Elder Scrolls and The Witcher can feel flimsy next to the sophisticated systems and heft of history on show here." From what I've seen, the beginning is a real grind until some of the better skills make surviving more creative and less stressful. I'm too old to tolerate risking losing hours of progress because of bugs anymore, so I'm staying tuned to updated patch notes before letting Christmas come early.

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Srydecka24

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Edited By Srydecka24

@arigoldstein88: No, I never said he SAID anything douche, though I don't know the specifics of the original spat he got into with a few female developers in 2015. It's just that he's thrown up flags of his beliefs, which is no less extreme than the loud mouthed, pink haired unshaven girls that want all men castrated, but like I said, I don't have this game yet. The politics of Eurogamer and a few other editorials suggesting banning the game for this is ridiculous. I'm terrified of Morrowind/Oblivion style game breaking and multi-hour losing glitches so I may wait a bit to get it. In the end, appreciation for art should have no bearing on the character of it's creator, if the art does not suffer from the politics, which this game doesn't appear to do.

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bongaconga

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Most importantly, does it have a brothel ?

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analgrin

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@bongaconga: Yes. They're "bathhouses" in this game. Situated on the outskirts of most towns

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How many times do I have to locate a shovel to complete a quest? My father, the blacksmith, should literally have hundreds of tools, but yet there isn’t a shovel to be found. If you like your “open world” to lead you around by the nose through a preprogrammed main story line, one where you can’t climb over a fence (How’s that for realism), have at it. I won’t even mention the ridiculous save system, the horrible loading times for conversations with NPCs, and the uninteresting “combat” system. Well I guess I just did. Yea it’s real hard, just keep hitting RB and your opponent will die. I guess you can tell I’m not a big fan of playing a part in a bad movie with a bad script in a non-open world billed as one. “Gosh the costumes and houses look so authentic... “ really? Look pretty bland to me. It feels like a bad version of the Sims, set in the 1400s, with forced dialogue and a forced story line. Not for me. Wish Xbox would give me a refund, I’m not going to look for another shovel.

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MashedBuddha

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Edited By MashedBuddha

@stantheman: Well it's not for you clearly. Didn't have such an issue with the shovel, but yeah you have to get one for another quest shortly after, so it's good you didn't keep playing cause your head will implode. Of course in that one, you have an option to ask the quest giver where to find one and he tells you exactly where it is. I even forgot to grab it and instead found one outside the door of the quest location. Not having trouble with shovels in my game.

A couple more thoughts:

It's not a movie.

You CAN climb/jump over fences that aren't clearly too tall.

Save and Exit has been patched in, there's also a Save Anywhere mod mentioned right in the review.

Authentic realism is usually bland, that's what makes it authentic and realistic. Having said that, I don't find the clothing and costumes bland at all.

Don't blame the shovel, it didn't mean to upset you.

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SJGSpook

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@stantheman: You are a special kind of spastic.

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deactivated-5d4e6334bc1ce

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Enjoying this true RPG game!

Very glad that backing the devs some 4 or so years ago paid out.

It has its problems, of course. For instance, I lost 4+ hours of exploration because I didn't realise the game had not saved during exploration (didn't annoy me as much as I thought it would). But it succeeds throughout, because you really feel like your skill is put to the test and as you progress you get better at everything--horseriding, maintenance, sword fighting, archery, picking locks, pickpocketing etc., etc.

Great, enjoyable game!

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JejeBob

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Edited By JejeBob

@timmyp1982: I find it refreshing to find a game where you don’t automatically have unlimited retries on everything. Back in the day, many games had no save and you had three lives (which could very occasionally be replenished) and this made actually getting through games a testiment of skill rather than exessive spare time.

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Nightmare350

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@timmyp1982: install a mod, if it's that big of an issue for you

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deactivated-5d4e6334bc1ce

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@timmyp1982: Invalidates? As oppose to the way a game can validate itself when you're permitted to abuse the system and mechanics of that game, a la Skyrim?

And so yes I am very VERY much enjoying this atm.

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GollyJeeWizz

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Edited By GollyJeeWizz

@Devils-DIVISION: Heh. Wait until your save corrupts and you have to restart over.

http://steamcommunity.com/app/379430/discussions/0/2860219962085682208/

I strongly advise saving every few minutes and as a new save instead of overwriting the same save over and over. Additionally I advise setting up a program to regularly perform a backup of your saves, such as Veeam Backup for Windows. The free edition will usually suffice.

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deactivated-5d4e6334bc1ce

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@gollyjeewizz:

Yeah, I've heard of people losing their progress. I'm playing on the PS4, ~70hrs in and so far so good. I have a Steam key but I havent felt like using the PC this time.

On the PS4 every save (incl. autosaves) is a new save. Don't know if this was intentional or not, but it works well if you need to back track. So far Ihaven't needed to do so.

My opinion is that some of the comments by people are captious. I guess I'm grateful to have a game like this with all the mechanics and systems that I've always wanted in a game. But it really should be noted that an open world RPG with so many open-ended management and interactive systems in place, would never come without issues, there are just way too many variables to test for. Especially for a small dev like Warhorse. That said they did a pretty good job considering the undertaking, and considering that my hopes were pretty low as development went on. ?

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mari3k

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40 h ... lul

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xbox360kb

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8 is a fair score. Seems that some people play games just to find flaws in it. And here is the true... every game has them. IMO KCD is closest to being true NextGen experience than anyone else. And keep in mind its a game from small studio. We need more people like Vavra in the industry, otherwise we will be drowning in the same sh... served every year by ubi and act.

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p1p3dream

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@xbox360kb: Well said.

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p1p3dream

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TLDR:

It's the Demon Soul's of RPG's.

I thought I might post my impressions for this game for others who might have similar gaming habits as me.

First, while I use to love RPG's in my early gaming years, I've been less and less compelled to play them. I think I was initially attracted to RPG's because they were the games with the most robust story, but as I got older and my tastes evolved- i was less into them. The last RPG that I really enjoyed and put time into was oblivion, but even so there was a lot of things I didn't really like about the game. The characters were ugly as hell, the dialog was awful, along with the writing in general- but I mostly just enjoyed running around and role playing my character and the combat system. Unfortuantely, the game kept getting in the way of me roleplaying and trying to enjoy it.

I always try the new roleplaying games that come out (Fallout, Skyrim, etc) but the stories just don't appeal to me anymore, the writing is generally shaky, and for some reason whoever is making these games just doesn't seem to have the ability to make character models that don't hurt my eyes- they are also just TOO DAMN BIG. I love games that are linear, tightly paced, intelligently scripted. I just don't have the time anymore to play these huge sprawling role playing games, that i don't love.

I dutifully tried Kingdom Come, not expecting to engage with it much, especially after some of the articles I read. I do not enjoy survival MMO's like Ark or Rust or whatever else, and I expected to be turned off pretty quick. When I turned on Kingdom I was intrigued, I had no idea that this game was taking place in our world, and was actually based on real events in our past. I LOVE history, I've always loved reading about the past, and watching shows about how things were. Medieval is, of course, a particularly exciting period. I love the realism of the game, and the writing so far, has been totally decent. The setting helps this issue hugely, because it automatically makes the game a more mature experience. There are no rats in sewers I have to kill, or magical creatures running around the land, everything supports the vision of the game and even though I didn't create Henry I've had no trouble adjusting to his character- in fact I enjoy playing a character with personality much better than a character who doesn't respond to anything and might as well be a zombie. I love the simulator aspects of the game,which don't seem too hard yet or unreasonable. And there are no naked men running around shouting racial slurs trying to kill me with sub machine guns. It turns out, that it's not the survival elements that i dont like about these games, but just the other human players who run around ruining the game by being a jerk.

The combat system *is* clunky and doesn't appear to have a lot of finesse to it, i basically spam my way though fights, and so far it's been mostly successful- but you know what, I found the combat in Witcher to be pretty clunky and graceless as well. I think it's improved in the later games, but I still don't think it's particularly enjoyable, and I never really fully grasped the system and it was a major reason I was turned off from the witcher series. I have already enjoyed Kingdom way more than Witcher. For all the praise jumped on Witcher, I just was not able to find a way to become involved in the story- I found it overly complicated with Lore,that I didn't have time to understand, and everything was just too abstract for me to find a way to relate to Geralts story, and i didnt have the paitients to play through hours before it got interesting.

Kingdom, by all rights, seems like it would be boring but because Henry is just an ordinary person who exists in a world that looks like mine, it wasn't hard for me to connect with Henry- I found the experience of just being Henry and taking care of his day to day needs interesting and occupying that the pacing of the game seems good. When the characters talk about issues of the day or current events in the pub, i can actually follow and understand- because it's all normal political issues and drama that references lore that I actually already know, or is very easy for me to make sense of.

The graphics are quite wonderful too! The landscape is beautiful, with rich detail, and flora and fauna that looks familiar and therefor makes the world look real. My friend said it best when he was watching- "the world does not look gamey or designed like a lot of RPGs do, it looks like a real place"

Henry is *not* a handsome man. He looks like a early ancestor of "chunk" from the goonies. And I love it. I mean he is a poor ass peasant afterall, people were not pretty back then. But he does look nicely modeled and real. The characters are all nicely modeled and are not hard to look at. They aren't works of art or photo realisitic, but they are definitely more attractive than the elder scrolls and fallout games.

This is already too long, and no one is going to read this far so I might as well stop.

TL;DR:

I don't normally like Western RPG's. Too Big, immature stories I don't relate to, lobotomized protagonist, complicated lore, awkward dialog, dull/poor writing, narrative dissonance.

I, so far, love Kingdom- It's a bit like a dog from the shelter. It takes some patience and effort to understand. It's definitely stubborn and will bite you let it, but if you just go in with an open mind be graceful about some of its clunky short comings, it will defintely reward you.

Another way I sometimes put it: It's the Demon Soul's of RPG's.

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Willywill

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@p1p3dream: This caught me eye "but I mostly just enjoyed running around and role playing my character and the combat system" because this is what I love to do in open world rpg's. I usually spend the majority of my time walking around exploring, combat, maybe stealing some stuff. Can you do this in KCD?

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stealthy1

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The game is a hot mess. Wtf do they mean an 8?!????

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monetstargazer

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Looks interesting but there's no char creation? That's often a big no for me, I remember that we can do that in the developing stage of this game? Not sure what's going on with that. And if you really want to play a "nobody" might as well be able to choose backgrounds, gender, or heck the face at the very LEAST, not a big fan of the name Henry as well we should be able to choose gender with an androgynous names link Alec or Carol to name a few. Other than that I really admire what are they doing with the game, I would've already own it if it have a char creation system in them.

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p1p3dream

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Edited By p1p3dream

@monetstargazer: This can be an issue for me, but it depends on the game. For multiplayer games, where I exist in a world with other players the Character gen is very important to me. In a good Character Creator, I can easily spend hours building my character- I enjoy it so much. But, one of the downsides of the char customizer, is that it puts a huge burden on the programming team and sometimes the player characters suffer because of allthe extra work it takes. For a lot of games, characters from custom creators tend to have a generic look to them. It's rare that a char gen has the ability to let me create a char im truly satisfied with, and the variety of characters can be a bit of an illusion because its more like creating a mr potato head. you've got a box of body parts, and in order to make sure everything can go with any other piece, styling and design is restrained and as i said, you end up with player characters that are a bit bland .

And with games that don't give the PC an identity or voice, because the idea is you will fill it with yourself, it usually only makes the character more bland and separate from the story. The pressure is all on the writers to somehow make it less awkward that your character never speaks and it ends up having these conversations where everyone talks around you, awkwardly putting sentences in your mouth and speaking for you, or just like you're not there.

When a game has a specific main character, it usually looks a lot cooler because a professional designer is sculpting that character and able to make something much more unique then a char gen can, and when the character has a personality and a voice, i think it helps make a story and conversations seem muchmore natural!

In Kingdom, Henry actually IS someone- he is a real person that exists in that time and place, with a personality, and a backstory that fits and makes sense with who he is. If you could choose different backgrounds and things, it would create a ton more work for the writers- and would probably end up making the writing so that it was "one size fits all" which is why some games have such bland writing... it avoids situations where you would reference a unique aspect of a character.

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monetstargazer

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@p1p3dream: Completely agree if this is more of an action/adventure game like Uncharted series, But in a RPG game, It would be really nice if I can have at least Mass Effect levels of customization, I'm sure it wouldn't break the immersion much, have more replayability value, this is basically playing a premade character, which is not that interesting for me, I even have the same problem with Witcher III which I only play through once.

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IrishInstigator

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"All of this adds up to a terrifying opening that serves as both a spectacular source of frustration (expect to die many times before successfully escaping Skalitz)"

Uh, I didn't die once. It wasn't slightly an issue. Am I the only one who found the opening segment no trouble at all?

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p1p3dream

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@irishinstigator: I didn't have too much trouble with it either. I actually did die once, but it was because I was fooling around and accidentally committed some crime that pissed off the guard.

I definitely came close to dying when I was being chased out of town, and I found it to be intense- but I survived!

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wrednajasobaka

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Save system is annoying in the beginning but it can be bypassed with a mod. I cannot say bugs got in a way of enjoying the game; to be honest, after playing almost 40 hours cannot recall any significant ones.

Alleged realism is slightly exaggerated: in the very first town you can gather enough herbs to sell them for small fortune. Sometimes it leads to funny situations where merchant will offer you tidy sum of money for dandelion you picked right in her own yard.

So far my favorite part is hunting bandits with a bow while riding a horse.

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TigusVidiks

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Edited By TigusVidiks

lol to those who claim this better than The Witcher 3. Not by a long shot, it's miles away. It's still fun because the permisse it offers is somewhat original with it's historical acurateness and attempt to offer a story driven medieval living simulation.

But as a game, in terms of polish, mastery, quality and scope, it will be a long time until anyone gets anywhere near The Witcher 3. If The Witcher 3 wasn't the masterpiece that it is, it would still be hard for Kingdom Come.

Even if Warhorse actually manage to fix the relentless bugs across every single mechanic the game currently has, and even appreciating some of the ideas thrown into Kingdom Come, execution is average at best, production values are average-low, and some of the bugs are simply impossible to fix, steeming from the crude simplicity that comes with very large game worlds from indy developers: - details suffer in every way.

From your character not being able to jump a small step if it's not an intended path, to your horse terrible movement, to the theorectically interesting combat system with a clunky execution, it shows in every corner, relentelessly.

You'll look over it because of the interesting story and skill progression, hoping that it's will improve with experience. It doesn't. It will always be clunky and crude. It's still a nice game, enjoyable, specially if the idea of a true medieval simulation allures you. But that's all. It has it's merits, but comparing this to TW3, is by itself doing a major favor to Kingdom Come.

And yes, played both (this one still going, almost through)

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ganondorf77

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@TigusVidiks: you are right. TW3 is a masterpiece. Best Ballance ever between size of map and stuff to do, realism and a game being a job itself. Nothing to do with this. You perhaps might enjoy this more or less than TW3, but it's a lot better game TW3, that is obvious.

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Nightmare350

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@TigusVidiks: didn't read all that, but i'm enjoying this much more than Witcher 3

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p1p3dream

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@TigusVidiks: I think this game looks fantastic, especially when you consider it was made by an indy company. I don't think "crude" or "simplistic" apply to the game's world in an form. I personally find the game much more compelling then the witcher. The story and world are much more realistic, the characters are simple, but look great and realistic. I had a difficult time taking Geralt seriously in the witcher. His gravelly voice and dialog led to this cartoonish or caricature feel. The story is a bit abstract and not super accessible- im sure if you have played all of the witcher games, it would help a lot. and I admit I haven't. I tried to play the early games, but i found the combat really clunky and a turn off, and again- there is just so much complicated lore that is being referenced all the time that it was hard for me to stay focused and interested on what was happening or care about the story.

Right from the start Kingdom is very easy to understand and engage with, its tone feels very serious and since its taking place in a real place and with actual events that have happened, the writing automatically feels much more realistic and the world is much less cartoonish. Don't get me wrong, I am not saying that The Witcher 3 isn't great work. But some people might actually find Kingdom come more compelling and appealing depending on interests and tastes.

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java_gurl

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Edited By java_gurl

@TigusVidiks: I am curious about your take in comparison to Skyrim. I am thinking most of your points apply there as well.

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p1p3dream

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Edited By p1p3dream

@java_gurl: THere is a lot of similarity to Skyrim. But it's a much more serious feeling game. The focus is much stronger on Role Playing in Kingdom. The story and lore is much a lot more accessible. The fighting is a bit clunky, but it hasn't turned me off from the game (yet) because I find everything else so interesting and enjoyable. I'm finding it very easy to role play the character and feel like i'm exisiting in this time and place. If you are interested in history, good story telling, and role playing, this would be worth your time.

If you'd like to watch me stream a play session just watch me on steam, i've been streaming for a lot of friends who've wanted to see it.

steam: pipedream / (eric pipers)

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deactivated-5ebc942967df5

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It’s not perfect but still more of a true RPG than The Witcher 3.

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Kingdom Come: Deliverance

First Released Feb 13, 2018
released
  • PC
  • PlayStation 4
  • Xbox One

Kingdom Come: Deliverance is an open world, action-adventure, role-playing game featuring blockbuster production values, a nonlinear story and revolutionary, first-person melee combat.

8
Great

Average Rating

159 Rating(s)

8
Content is generally suitable for ages 17 and up. May contain intense violence, blood and gore, sexual content and/or strong language.
Mature
Blood and Gore, Intense Violence, Nudity, Strong Language, Strong Sexual Content, Use of Alcohol