Review

Greedfall Review - Lost In Another World

  • First Released Sep 9, 2019
    released
  • PC

Discovering a lost world, again.

There's religious fanaticism, and then there's Inquisitor Aloysius from Greedfall, a man so excessively villainous his whole schtick borders on farcical. A member of Thélème, one of the game's six factions, he appears when you first step into the town square of the city San-Matheus. What draws your eye is the sight of a hulking woodland beast howling in pain while tied to a stake in an enormous burning pyre, as a captured native islander looks on helplessly. When asked why the creature and his people are subjected to such cruelty, the Inquisitor bellows an odious response about cleansing the corrupt souls of his tribe. Then in one swift movement, he yanks the islander's head, stabs the poor soul with a knife, and yells obscenities about heresies into the sky.

That uncomfortable scene is emblematic of the plot in Greedfall; its tales of colonialism and political subterfuge are tackled with such little nuance that it verges on parody. The islanders wear face paint, have heavy accents, and venerate the woodland beasts as deities, while the cardinals, bishops, and alchemists refer to them as savages that need enlightenment or salvation. Greedfall relies heavily on these kinds of blunt narrative tropes for its setting, much in the same way it does on a very familiar open-world RPG structure. And while it's very easy to lose yourself in its competent, if comfortable, formula, it means that Greedfall ultimately feels unremarkable at best.

No Caption Provided

You play as the charming diplomat De Sardet from the Congregation of Merchants, who's in charge of brokering peace between two warring factions: the Thélème, a theocratic nation that preach their gospel heavily and want to convert as many natives as possible, even if it's by force, and the Bridge Alliance, home to a nation of alchemists who wield their vast and incomparable knowledge of science for political ends.

Both factions want to colonize a mystical island called Teer Fradee, which is brimming with fantastical flora and fauna. They, as well as the clans of indigenous people who are resisting their incursions, seek your help for their own ends. But that's not all; you also have something you want from the island: the cure for the Malicor, a mysterious plague devastating your home. In short, everyone wants a piece of this enchanted isle, and your task is to navigate through this political minefield for the best outcome--whatever you think that is.

Greedfall attempts to tweak certain aspects of its otherwise conventional colonialist plot (the islanders aren't depicted as crazed natives or hungry cannibals, and the factions are somewhat multicultural), but beyond a vague sense of awareness about its oppressive legacy, Greedfall's heavy-handed themes never make way for anything more nuanced or interesting. Sure, it highlights the exploitative behaviors of the Thélème and Bridge Alliance factions, but their actions are so moustache-twirling malicious that they become mere caricatures of evildoers.

Even your companions and other characters are cookie-cutter emblems of their group: Siora is the native princess who wishes to seek peace for her clan; Petrus is the religious Thélème advisor with tons of political savvy; and Kurt is the loyal, headstrong mercenary whose stoic demeanour can barely disguise his world-weariness. Most damning of all is your character, De Sardet, who, as the big hero, embodies the "white man's burden" allegory that also plagues other colonial-themed narratives; it's all on you to liberate the natives or unite the factions against them.

Greedfall's saving grace is that its role-playing systems are adequate, and the game's greatest strength is how well it sticks to what is tried-and-tested. It features mechanical design that's common in the genre--exploring, looting, questing, etc--but it's also savvy enough to incorporate the best versions of these elements--most notably it feels like it draws inspiration from CD Projekt Red's The Witcher 3, a title I couldn't stop making mental comparisons to.

At the beginning, you're given the choice of playing as one of three character archetypes: the melee-focused warrior, the stealthy gunslinger, or the spell-wielding tactician. But you're also given the flexibility to break out of these standard classes through an array of skill trees. As you progress through the game, you can freely invest hard-earned points, which opens up a variety of methods you can approach combat with and even how you resolve quests--be it bludgeoning your way through conflict with a two-handed axe or wearing a horde of rampaging beasts down with poison traps.

No Caption Provided

And, as has become common in open-world RPGs, Greedfall also comes with a crafting system. Materials are in abundance--enemies, from human foes to wild animals, drop them frequently, while crates and jugs across most cities are bursting with goodies you can loot. One constraint, however, is that you can only craft upgrades to armor and weapons you own, rather than cobble brand-new equipment altogether. This streamlines crafting, and it also encourages you to still seek out better equipment. Meanwhile, combat is more than just a frenzied blur of swords and gunplay too; you can make tactical pauses to examine your enemies closely, change your target, consider your combat options, or silently contemplate how stunning your swashbuckling buccaneer looks in the heat of action.

Greedfall suffers from some bugs, primitive systems, and even glaring spelling errors, however. Some dialogue is clearly skewed towards a male De Sardet; in my playthrough as a female De Sardet, several characters still referred to me as "he." The stealth mechanism is also unintentionally hilarious. When on a stealth mission, enemies tend to treat companions as invisible; they will not notice two big, oafish men blundering about in front of them, but will jump out of their skins when they notice De Sardet peeking out from behind a nearby crate. Romancing your companions is also another thing you can do in the game, but the moves you need to make to get into their hearts (and under the sheets) are so perfunctory, it’s almost unmemorable. You engage in a three-part companion quest with the lover of your choice, where you'll find conversations that give you the chance to maximize your romance meter. But the game makes it obvious when you've said something wrong (characters will retort back unhappily, accompanied by a numerical drop in your reputation), so it's an easy process to save scum, and the ultimate reward is a not-very-saucy bedroom cutscene.

In spite of the game's blundering narrative issues, it's still easy to get hooked into the rhythm of exploring, crafting, brawling, investigating, and interacting with the host of characters and beasts, while getting lost among the beautiful lush greenery of Teer Fradee. Running into more challenging enemies or engaging in boss fights are a particular treat, since it's an opportunity to pit your hard-earned combat abilities against formidable foes. And tucked within the story, as hackneyed as it is, are occasional glimpses of genuine humanity, such as De Sardet's close relationship with their cousin Constantin, who's also the new governor of Teer Fradee.

But ultimately, because Greedfall is so cavalier about its colonialist themes, and because it plays it safe by sticking so closely to the template of open-world RPGs, it doesn't really feel revelatory in any way. Instead, it's content to be just another digital playground--just another world filled with magic, riches, secrets, and monsters for players to shoot and loot at will. I did have fun when I got lost in its familiar RPG loop, but its lack of nuance or innovation prevents it from being truly remarkable.

Please use a html5 video capable browser to watch videos.
This video has an invalid file format.
00:00:00
Sorry, but you can't access this content!
Please enter your date of birth to view this video

By clicking 'enter', you agree to GameSpot's
Terms of Use and Privacy Policy

Now Playing: Greedfall Video Review

Back To Top

The Good

  • The world of Teer Fradee is a beautiful place to explore
  • Tactical combat is satisfying, especially when you engage with more challenging foes

The Bad

  • Narrative is incredibly heavy-handed and lacks nuance, bordering on parody
  • Sticks too closely to existing open-world RPG conventions
  • Cookie-cutter characters and companions are unmemorable

About the Author

Khee Hoon spent about 33 hours on Greedfall on PC to get as much out of the experience as possible, and was exhausted by the end of the run. Review code was provided by the publisher.
246 Comments  RefreshSorted By 
GameSpot has a zero tolerance policy when it comes to toxic conduct in comments. Any abusive, racist, sexist, threatening, bullying, vulgar, and otherwise objectionable behavior will result in moderation and/or account termination. Please keep your discussion civil.

Avatar image for dinamo4ever
dinamo4ever

90

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 1

User Lists: 0

Edited By dinamo4ever

please SJW and politics DON'T belong in a game review! Wtf do you do that?!

also a 5?! lol

I liked this site, but from some time I have much more trust in steam reviews ... I came back here from time to time, only to find reviews like this... shame!

4 • 
Avatar image for yeknomdab
yeknomdab

210

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 15

User Lists: 0

@dinamo4ever: Pro tip: reviews are only opinions--play what you want.

Bonus: Never trust anything on the internet until you've fact-checked or canvassed a broad spectrum...twice. Or just go ahead and stick your dick into that particular light socket.

Advice: Complaining about "SJW" politics is effectively announcing your support of the Dark Side, and thus far more "political" (and telling) than simple social commentary.

Upvote • 
Avatar image for OkRaider88
OkRaider88

62

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 0

User Lists: 0

Edited By OkRaider88

Khee Hoon Chan spent 33hrs on an RPG and became exhausted? LOL. Now on to the "white man's burden" comment... Sorry, right-wingers it's spot on. This is an old story-telling trope that's as old as... well.. colonial imperialism itself. I disagree with Chan that the villains were a parody, because there are many real world examples of colonial cruelty that makes the game's villains tame by comparison. Google the term "Genocide of indigenous peoples", and you'll see that we live in the shadow of a world order built on the wanton extermination/decimation of a lot people. I sorely wish that was an opinion - but it's a historical reality that this game tries to use as a backdrop for its fantasy tale, and does a good job of it. Yeah, it would have been cool to have the option to play as a native character. But I also like the idea of playing a colonizer that decides to rise above the colonial interests of his own people. In this way, HE redeems the character of his own people by showing that they're all not cruel, fanatical, genocidal imperial a--holes. Maybe in the sequel we'll get the freedom to choose characters from different factions.

Upvote • 
Avatar image for waelse1
waelse1

488

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 5

User Lists: 0

Gamespot is a parody of its former self, games aren't reviewed on graphics, performance or fun, but on a leftist political agenda.

9 • 
Avatar image for twztid13
twztid13

1897

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 0

User Lists: 0

@waelse1: they're a product of their location. The Bay area has turned a blind eye to the homeless, whose feces line the streets for those who can't afford the expensive mansions or gated homes, and that's all because the residents with homes have been too busy telling the rest of the country how morally superior they are. I would say that's fine if they think that's "compassion", but when federal tax dollars have to go fix that issue, it's all of our concern, especially how it got that way. Californians, PLEASE stop moving to Texas & voting the same way you did in California. That's not politically correct, you know.

4 • 
Avatar image for deactivated-5d8d6c6e927af
deactivated-5d8d6c6e927af

18

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 0

User Lists: 5

Wow, why am I not surprised that a Gamespot journalist would start in with the left-wing politically correct activism in a video game review. I stopped reading after bringing up that a "white man goes to save the natives." You do realize that the protagonist is CUSTOMIZABLE, and that he could be black as well, right?

Your entire presupposition simply doesn't hold water. We see this so often now, injecting political discourse into video game news and reviews. Please don't veil the activism into our escapism, I beg you. This is the one place we should be able to come and not have to endure the tenuous rhetoric of party politics and political correctness.

And you fundamentally misunderstand the story, my guess is intentionally to twist the narrative for your political reasons. The natives dont need to be saved, they were surviving fine before the factions came to the island. The factions exploit and invade the natives territory, and the natives dont ask for your help unless you push yourself into the situation.

Shame on you, for pushing your discourse into a VIDEO GAME REVIEW. This is why you lose readers. I left IGN after they continually pushed disguised left wing politics into unrelated articles. One of their "Best games to play on 4th of July" started in on trump jabs and making assertions about immigration policy... In a video game article, really? Came here hoping it would be different, but I see now that was foolish. Now gamespot goes on the list of sites I actively avoid, congrats youve earned it.

11 • 
Avatar image for RaveNRolla
RaveNRolla

1567

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 12

User Lists: 0

chant with me commenters, chant with me:

IT. IS. AN: OPINIOOOON...

OPINIOOOON... (major third)

OPINIOOOON... (fifth)

5 • 
Avatar image for RaveNRolla
RaveNRolla

1567

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 12

User Lists: 0

@RaveNRolla: aw man, i wrote it down ethetically as a canon and it just auto-deleted all my spacebar inputs :(

Upvote • 
Avatar image for Revl8n
Revl8n

184

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 0

User Lists: 0

GreedFall is an excellent game. This reviewer clearly has a bias against the developer, or perhaps is trying to prop up the crumbling unethical US publisher market share. If you remotely like RPGs get this game.

6 • 
Avatar image for gr4h4m833zy
Gr4h4m833zy

559

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 0

User Lists: 5

@Revl8n: how much better is fallout 4 than this?

Upvote • 
Avatar image for oldendorf
Oldendorf

1

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 0

User Lists: 5

Edited By Oldendorf

My wife and I are both historians and teachers. During the colonization of the Americas, there were real-world people as over-the-top villainous as the inquisitor sooooo, I don’t understand the complaint. Furthermore, I’ve never seen the word “nuance” used so many times before. History is not always nuanced. Sometimes it’s a bludgeon. The cruelty of colonization was NEVER nuanced. It was exposed, raw, and in your face.

Also, this review seems contrary just to be contrary. It’s hovering around 75 on metacritic. Possibly because the review is posted a week after most other reviews.

Or, the reviewer never plays mid-range RPGs.

Though, I do have a question: does anyone know why people are having two wildly different play times? Half the reviews say ~60 hours and the other half ~30 hours.

11 • 
Avatar image for deviltaz35
DEVILTAZ35

8262

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 0

User Lists: 5

@oldendorf: Different skill levels is my guess. It isn't really a hard game overall but a lot are recommending to play on hardest setting all the same. Game spot got this score spectacularly wrong as the game is worth at least a nine.

There is just so much effort that has gone into this game and even IGN recognised how great it is for the most part.

It was clear this reviewer is just not a fan of this type of RPG so perhaps was not the best person to be reviewing such material in the first place seeing unfortunately their review seems to carry weight.

This form of criticism is just not something these Devs deserve this time around.

3 • 
Avatar image for Gelugon_baat
Gelugon_baat

24231

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 611

User Lists: 4

Edited By Gelugon_baat

@deviltaz35: Yeah, I get the impression that the review might have been handed to the 'wrong' person - specifically a person that is already tired of open-world RPGs.

2 • 
Avatar image for benjy117
benjy117

264

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 23

User Lists: 0

@Gelugon_baat: What's this? Agreeing? (maga hats turn)

2 • 
Avatar image for Gelugon_baat
Gelugon_baat

24231

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 611

User Lists: 4

Edited By Gelugon_baat

@benjy117: Well, if reviews of games are meant to be handed to people who are still interested and avid about the gameplay of these games, then the assignment of this reviewer to this game would be a "mistake". The opening passages already suggest that the reviewer is a jaded person.

On the other hand, do note the emphasis on the word "mistake". It's really a subjective thing.

Some people may consider that reviews should be done by some who still has an interest in what is being reviewed. Other people would consider that to be "genre-bias".

P.S. By the way, I wrote all of the above for other people to read. It's not for you, because I remember you. That said, screw you, you asshat.

Upvote • 
Avatar image for twztid13
twztid13

1897

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 0

User Lists: 0

@Gelugon_baat: wow, i remember you. Always trying to get brownie points from GameSpot's staff. This has to be an anomaly, unless...? Either way, nice to see the common sense perspective this time.

2 • 
Avatar image for Gelugon_baat
Gelugon_baat

24231

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 611

User Lists: 4

@twztid13: . Sure, I may have defended some of them in the past - but that's mainly to annoy fans of this-and-that game who get pissed that the game that they like wasn't reviewed "fairly".

That said, I remember you too. Screw you, by the way.

Upvote • 
Avatar image for gargungulunk
gargungulunk

721

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 5

User Lists: 3

The game looks rad, and it's not buggy.

I haven't played an open world fantasy game for a long time, so it should be fresh to play. I like the bent of it being more of 1700-1800s feel, instead of a 1200-1400's feel. Should be a good change of pace.

Any open world game will feel stale or generic after dozens of hours. Moderation is the key I guess.

Upvote • 
Avatar image for hushed_kasket
hushed_kasket

427

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 6

User Lists: 0

Had to come back to this for a couple things I noticed.

1.) "Greedfall" has a score on this site that is lower than the 6/10 for "Anthem" (an arguably unfinished & justifiably ridiculed game), and as of today, also 3 whole points lower than "Untitled Goose Game" which got an 8/10.

This is beyond parody. A tiny cartoon goose game may be super fun and deserve the 8/10, but by comparison, the larger more impressive RPG is inexcusably getting reamed on this one (not unlike the horrible treatment "Days Gone" got here).

2.) According to the article (and the phrasing is important), the reviewer "Khee Hoon spent about 33 hours on Greedfall on PC to get as much out of the experience as possible, and was exhausted by the end of the run." Other reviews say this game is 50-65 hours. Um, did he not even finish it? DUDE. DIDN'T. EVEN. FINISH. THE. GAME?

33 hours is weak sauce when it comes to open world RPGs. I spent at least 200 hrs in Witcher 3 with DLC.

Did Gamespot put a casual-RPG fan on assignment to review a game for its readers, and that reviewer doesn't even care enough to complete the game? I wouldn't put it passed them, honestly.

No one knows what's going on around here anymore ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

14 • 
Avatar image for ryanthegeneral
ryanthegeneral

133

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 0

User Lists: 0

@hushed_kasket: Hope you read this... I was literally just thinking about picking up days gone. How is the story? Is it worth a pick up?

Upvote • 
Avatar image for hushed_kasket
hushed_kasket

427

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 6

User Lists: 0

@ryanthegeneral: Hey Ryan, here's my review —> https://www.gamespot.com/days-gone/user-reviews/2200-12787892/

Absolutely worth picking up, imo.

I'd also add these points:
• Finished the story, and started a second playthrough. Love it.
• The game is MUCH bigger and longer than I expected, which was great since I loved being in that world.
• The post-launch Weekly Challenges (which are all available now, I think) are fun and add quite a bit of content to game that's already loaded with it.
• Post-launch patches have added many quality of life improvements.

Hope this helps.


Upvote • 
Avatar image for ryanthegeneral
ryanthegeneral

133

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 0

User Lists: 0

@hushed_kasket: My favorite quote I have seen for this game review wise came from IGN. Which talked in a negative manner about it having "non interactive flashbacks"... my eyebrow raised and I thought to myself- "you mean cutscenes?" It actually giggled a little. I never talk bad about a review but that one was just funny.

Upvote • 
Avatar image for honestgamer97
HonestGamer97

2

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 0

User Lists: 5

Edited By HonestGamer97

@hushed_kasket: whoever said the game is 50-65 hours long was lying and hasn’t likely finished it. I completed practically everything the game has, every quest available in 32 hours, so the reviewer was spot on with fact. Also although yes it has a budget, it still had a price tag practically the same as a AAA game. There were things I didn’t agree with in this review, but I do agree the story and themes aren’t used to there fullest. Also you can’t say a small indie game shouldn’t get a higher score than a bigger game, as you can’t compare them in the same sense. With that logic, every indie game can never get scored higher than a bigger budget game.

2 • 
Avatar image for hushed_kasket
hushed_kasket

427

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 6

User Lists: 0

@honestgamer97: Second paragraph of T.J. Hafer's review on IGN starts, "Comparisons to The Witcher series and Dragon Age: Origins are easy to make as you travel across the wild, semi-open environments for a 60-hour campaign." And I believe he played and finished it way more than I believe Khee did (especially considering nowhere in the GS review does it claim he finished it). We'll see on this one, I guess, since I'm 25 hours in and not near completing it yet.

Of course an indie game grades differently than a larger release. I even said the goose game may deserve an 8. But one major complaint of that review was that the game was short on content (I've played that one, too, and yes it's way too short). You can't use that same excuse to place a different game in "mediocre" category.

Upvote • 
Avatar image for honestgamer97
HonestGamer97

2

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 0

User Lists: 5

@hushed_kasket: I still find it hard to believe that people have taken twice the time to complete it as I have. There was only a single quest I hadn’t finished, which was collecting the lost pages of a professor (I collected like half of them). I wasn’t rushing, I was playing at a normal speed. There isn’t a ton of content there.

Upvote • 
Avatar image for hushed_kasket
hushed_kasket

427

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 6

User Lists: 0

Edited By hushed_kasket

@honestgamer97: Though I can't know, I probably play through slower than average (especially in RPGs / open worlds), but my pace is faster through this one than usual (because I have several other games in my waiting-to-play queue), and I'm still approaching your 32-hour with many quests remaining. And yes, the "discover all camps" and "find the professor's notes" quest is quite large.

But this may speak to the reviewers more than anything else... If the completion times are true, one obviously spent much more time exploring and enjoying the world, characters, and quests than the other. My main question would be whether the GS reviewer is a fan of RPGs in general or if he just got assigned a game and then had to trudge through it regardless of whether he even enjoys the genre?

Upvote • 
Avatar image for Gelugon_baat
Gelugon_baat

24231

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 611

User Lists: 4

@honestgamer97: Likely those players who spend so much are spending time sightseeing rather than following the marker.

Upvote • 
Avatar image for deviltaz35
DEVILTAZ35

8262

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 0

User Lists: 5

@Gelugon_baat: Not hard to there is some truly amazing sights . Great looking game for the most part on Xbox one X . Especially for an AA developer with a relatively constrained budget. 10 million i believe it was in the vicinity of which is quite remarkable seeing how great it turned out.

Upvote • 
Avatar image for Gelugon_baat
Gelugon_baat

24231

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 611

User Lists: 4

Edited By Gelugon_baat

@deviltaz35: Years ago, I would say "awesome that such a team with a relatively low budget could do something like this", and I would like to play the game.

Not anymore. Been there, done that, and been burned for realizing that I have wasted time on something that is not guaranteed to be something that I would like.

Emphasis on "guarantee". I couldn't give jack-squat about the pedigree or apparent skill of a game developer these days if I don't get a guarantee (which I know I realistically won't).

Upvote • 
Avatar image for hushed_kasket
hushed_kasket

427

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 6

User Lists: 0

@Gelugon_baat: Which, I would think, would constitute a large portion of open-world RPG fans. Exploration and discovery are staples of the genre.

Upvote • 
Avatar image for Gelugon_baat
Gelugon_baat

24231

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 611

User Lists: 4

@hushed_kasket: I would say that there is some ironic contradiction about "exploration" and "discovery" in the same sentence as "staples".

I had played a lot of these kinds of games already (as the reviewer likely has). I had already long tired of seeing how much "effort" that developers put into their so-called world-building, especially if all they did was just introduce more models of animals that do little more than roam around, trees that do little more than just be props, and such.

This is the kind of "open-world gameplay" that B-listers like the Gothic games and so-called A-listers like the Elder Scrolls titles have done to heck and back. I don't want to play any more of these.

Upvote • 
Avatar image for hushed_kasket
hushed_kasket

427

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 6

User Lists: 0

@Gelugon_baat: Both Gothic and Elder Scrolls games have spent multiple iterations in the same universe, so original fans have grown tired of the lack of discovery (of regions, races, politics, history, lore, etc., of the in-game universe) in those titles. That's why IPs like those have to innovate to keep their brands fresh, otherwise it's an inevitable death sentence in the RPG genre.

But this is a new IP. The reviewer doesn't claim that there's anything mechanically wrong with the game's systems (even calls the combat system "satisfying"). His complaints are almost absolutely about the devs' creative choices when it comes to delivering the story.

You very well may be right (as I'd also posted in an earlier comment)— GS gave the wrong guy the review code for this. It's a terrible reflection of the game's quality.

2 • 
Avatar image for Gelugon_baat
Gelugon_baat

24231

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 611

User Lists: 4

Edited By Gelugon_baat

@hushed_kasket: 'Innovate' how? The settings can be swapped for other things, but it's still the same gameplay and plot set-up.

There's a power progression system, which of course means that there has to be some plot excuse for why the player character can become so stupid-powerful, either in combat ("Ultimate move! Kaboom!") or in dialogue ("You made an argument so good that I am going to walk off-screen.").

If there's combat, there has to be a backstory about conflict and such other confrontational themes to justify the presence of fighting and killing. If there's diplomacy, there has to be some backstory about cultural matters, e.g. honour, customs and such, and relatively sapient beings that are capable of reason so that there can be dialogue.

If there is equipment, then naturally there will be loot, and a currency system of sorts. A crafting system would also be there to complicate matters by tying item drops to currency and perhaps any toggle scripts for NPCs ("you scratch my back, so I scratch yours").

It's all formulaic, really! Plenty of checkbox-ticking!

To a jaded person, this is all just "been there, done that".

I can't say much about this game, because I haven't played it. Yet, I haven't seen any mention of anything particularly new and awesome that it does in terms of gameplay or storytelling, or at least anything that is not terribly subjective. There's only the bit about some "AA" or "B" developer doing an otherwise functional open-world RPG on a relatively small budget, but I don't find that impressive nowadays.

Upvote • 
Avatar image for hushed_kasket
hushed_kasket

427

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 6

User Lists: 0

@Gelugon_baat: The "innovation" comment meant making meaningful gameplay changes relative to the previous games in that franchise. Fallout games will always have some player base because of the world its fans love, but that player base will shrink if Bethesda, in this example, doesn't make at least small quality-of-life improvements or add fun gameplay features... because even fans get bored of the same universe and same backstory setups. But Bethesda doesn't have to make genre-effecting changes to get fans to play Fallout.

Of all the comments I've seen on this game, a huge number of players are very satisfied with the world, characters, and lore of Greedfall. It may only really be a 7 because of the limited resources the smaller dev had access to, or because it just couldn't reach the polish and nuance of the Wild Hunt. BUT, my argument is that for a game to be a 5/10, the general consensus should be that it's underwhelming. If some people say, "it's not for me," "I wasn't that impressed," etc., but many others are saying, "I loved this game," or "I've enjoyed every minute," a 5/10 is too harsh.

I know it's the reviewer's opinion. And this is mine.

I probably wouldn't even be addressing it if there wasn't a noticeable recent trend on this site for giving outlying low scores to otherwise lauded games. But that's Gamespot's MO now, apparently. So, whatever. Credibility be damned, I guess.

Upvote • 
Avatar image for Gelugon_baat
Gelugon_baat

24231

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 611

User Lists: 4

@hushed_kasket: What "credibility"? *Chortle*!

It was a site about entertainment products in the first place! You expect "credibility" from such a thing?

Upvote • 
Avatar image for hushed_kasket
hushed_kasket

427

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 6

User Lists: 0

@Gelugon_baat: It's fine if that's your perspective, but a lot of ppl assume this is "journalism" (I know better, too).

To me, it's less about the "news" aspect of it, and more about the "consumer protection" side of it.

Upvote • 
Avatar image for Gelugon_baat
Gelugon_baat

24231

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 611

User Lists: 4

Edited By Gelugon_baat

@hushed_kasket: If it's more about "consumer protection", we should have more jaded people as reviewers of video games.

After all, entertainment products are supposed to entertain. If they are boring, they fail as such products.

P.S. I have never considered "journalism" of any kind to be convincingly a profession. For all the virtues about this field (namely the much vaunted "search for truth"), that it requires journalists to chase for content and viewership prevents it from achieving nobility.

Upvote • 
Avatar image for hushed_kasket
hushed_kasket

427

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 6

User Lists: 0

Edited By hushed_kasket

@Gelugon_baat: We may be coming into align. I wasn't alluding to reviews provideing "protection" from, say, unethical developer practices (which happens, but that's subject matter for exposes, feature articles, etc.), but simply from consumers spending money on unpleasant gaming experiences.

Every game / genre has a target market but also hopes to pick up some casual gamers (swing voters, let's say). Gamespot has done a horrific job of conveying the enjoy-ability of games—especially to the target market, but also to the middle-roaders— giving low (and arbitrary) numerical scores to otherwise lauded games. And their "low score" rationale for some of these, imo, doesn't pass muster.

My opinion on this is not uninformed by the past. I've take issue with several of their reviews (more so lately, it seems) and have even written counter reviews. You said you haven't played Greedfall— my opinion is that it deserves at least a 7. We can argue hypotheticals all day, but until you've played it, you can't really argue a 5 is justified. Problem now is, how can you know that your opinion of your playthrough isn't swayed having seeing a "Mediocre" review score... even if it only affirms and reinforces issues you would have had with it otherwise?

Upvote • 
Avatar image for Gelugon_baat
Gelugon_baat

24231

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 611

User Lists: 4

@hushed_kasket: Hey, I can't say that I agree with the review because I haven't played the game - but I have learned to take "been there, done that" reviews seriously because, chances are, I am even more jaded than whoever wrote them. I don't want to feel any regret about having wasted time on something boring that I had already been warned about.

Upvote • 
Avatar image for hushed_kasket
hushed_kasket

427

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 6

User Lists: 0

@Gelugon_baat: Got that, but I'm really speaking more to a pattern than this review alone.

Upvote • 
Avatar image for Gelugon_baat
Gelugon_baat

24231

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 611

User Lists: 4

@hushed_kasket: I doubt that pattern is deliberate; that would take effort, and GameSpot's staff isn't exactly paid enough for that. Besides, GameSpot's outsourcing reviews to a smorgasboard of freelancers nowadays. I would expect that to cause enough "controversies" on its own, e.g. zero "consistency" in the reviews due to the use of so many freelancers.

Upvote • 
Avatar image for hushed_kasket
hushed_kasket

427

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 6

User Lists: 0

@Gelugon_baat: If the pattern were deliberate, it would likely arise from a set of standards set by Gamespot for its reviewers (which exists in some form, I'm sure).

If the pattern is inadvertent, it still exists, and being shot in the foot hurts the same whether it's done on purpose or on accident. One could argue malice and negligence are equally offensive. An inadvertent pattern should at least raise questions, which is what I'm doing.

It isn't too difficult to keep most reviews within the "reasonable" realm. As long as a competent gamer is playing it, some consensus can usually be found. Just look at the user scores for multiple games on this site... the vast majority of scores fall into one or even two adjacent score lines. But if 89 people rate a game an average of 8, but the posted "official" Gamespot review is 5, that tells me the "official" review isn't representative of the quality of the game.

But some of these are real outliers. If Gamespot isn't looking into the outliers (or worse, even encouraging them), they aren't doing their readers justice. (For the same effect in movie reviews, see RottenTomatoes)

Back when GS had only a few, consistent reviewers (e.g., Kevin Van Ord), it was easier to gauge a game's quality based on the subjective review because you knew that reviewer's taste and could judge your own likely enjoyment relative to his/hers. Now with GS freelancing so much (or new hires?), who knows what these kids like or don't, and since they may only ever review one or two games, you can't know if their reviews are "good" to you.

Upvote • 
Avatar image for Gelugon_baat
Gelugon_baat

24231

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 611

User Lists: 4

Edited By Gelugon_baat

@hushed_kasket: I scoff at the majority scores more than I do the outlier ones. They are often loaded with fans, whom I loathe because they encourage perpetuation of game designs to stale stagnation. If they are not fans, then they are review bombers, whom I despise even more because they are knee-jerk jerks.

So no, I don't and won't ever agree with the notion that just because the majority is overwhelming, the outlier is somehow "not representative". That said, "representative" itself is already a loaded term; that would suggest that the reviewer should already be part of the target market of the game.

For other consumer products that are of more practical use and of greater necessity, I would agree that the review should be made by an individual in the target market. But for entertainment products like video games? No, and never.

Upvote • 
Avatar image for Gelugon_baat
Gelugon_baat

24231

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 611

User Lists: 4

@hushed_kasket: I have read Benton's article, and I would say it's emblematic of the kinds of consumers who just can't get out of their comfort zone.

Still not for me. I get bored easily of the all too familiar, and I no longer hold any kind of reverence for supposed 'classic' gameplay.

Regarding the matter of people who are completely not within the target market when it comes to reviews of games, I would say this: why not?

You might argue that these people are not well informed, but I, for one, don't consider reviews to be a good way to know about a game anymore - not ever since I realized long ago that individual opinions are terribly subjective and most reviewers don't write down what I want to know about. Rather, I want to be amused by what the writer writes.

That said, I like Benton's analogy of tomato soup, just as I like Chan Khee Hoon's lament about "same old, same old" in this review.

Upvote • 
Avatar image for hushed_kasket
hushed_kasket

427

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 6

User Lists: 0

@Gelugon_baat: "If they are not fans, then they are review bombers" <--- You've just given a great reason to go with the majority consensus and ignore the outliers.

"the review should be made by an individual in the target market... for entertainment products like video games? No, never" <--- Nonsense. Otherwise, just have some 90-yo grandma review the next COD, or just ask Dean Takahashi about his impressions when Cuphead 2 comes out.

Charlie Benton (CulturedVultures) had many of my similar thoughts, and wrote them down — https://culturedvultures.com/as-bioware-chases-trends-greedfall-fills-the-gap/

Upvote • 
Avatar image for DeadManRollin
DeadManRollin

4333

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 19

User Lists: 0

I admit, I am yet to play this game--but something is definitely wrong with this review. I was reading through it, but somewhere down the line, I got lost because the reviewer was simply blabbering away unnecessary facts without talking about the game.

And his verdict? A game that got everything right about RPGs; most of them has uninteresting companions, a lot of quests, magic, brawling, looting and crafting, and an open world, and these are the things that make them fun. But for this game, the reviewer was expecting "innovation".

Well, excuse me, when was the last time an RPG broke new grounds? Most of the titles that comes out in the market revolves around a familiar mold, and honestly, gamers also prefer that. When I am playing an RPG, I know there will be quests, side quests, some will be fun, some will be for grinding. There will be a mount and fast travel option, weapons and armors which can be crafted and customized, good and bad consequences of decisions, and an option to stay neutral.

If a game has most of these things, I score it 7. Beyond that takes exceptional story telling, or below that requires abysmal controls or other bugs.

So without any significant, game breaking flaws, no game that gets most things right should receive 5 out of 10.

But then again, I will have to play the game to corroborate on that.

6 • 
Avatar image for ChrisAnetkaC
ChrisAnetkaC

702

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 216

User Lists: 0

What else is new? If you played one RPG you played them all. They're like Hollywood movies. Same screenplay, different setting and faces (sometimes).

2 • 
Avatar image for bookfan8780
bookfan8780

180

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 5

User Lists: 0

I completely agree. I tried about 30 minutes of this game and was bored out of my mind. Felt like a Dishonored or Witcher 3 rip-off that was just utterly forgettable.

3 • 

GreedFall

First Released Sep 9, 2019
released
  • PC
  • PlayStation 4
  • Xbox One

GreedFall

5
Mediocre

Average Rating

84 Rating(s)

6.7
Content is generally suitable for ages 17 and up. May contain intense violence, blood and gore, sexual content and/or strong language.
Mature
Blood, Language, Partial Nudity, Suggestive Themes, Violence