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Review

Dragon Age: Inquisition Review

  • First Released Nov 18, 2014
    released
  • Reviewed Nov 11, 2014
  • XONE
  • PS4
Jeremy Jayne on Google+

One for the ages.

GameSpot may get a commission from retail offers.

Just as Jesus of Nazareth was asked to answer to claims of his divinity, so too does Dragon Age: Inquisition ask you to respond to rumors of your own godhood. As the game opens, you tumble from a rift in the sky, from which onlookers also see a glimpse of a woman. Many believe that the woman must be Andraste, the prophet whose doctrine inspired the rise of the Chantry, yet you have no memory of the event. Perhaps you are a chosen one; perhaps you are merely fortunate. The Maker may know, but His voice continues to go unheard, at least directly; it is up to you, and those you influence, to decide whether you have been marked by a deity. And just as with real-life matters of faith, there is not always a clear resolution.

Dragon Age: Inquisition does not draw subtle parallels between the Chantry and modern-day Christianity. Its references are obvious and sometimes heavy-handed, but clear allegory aside, this vast and engrossing role-playing game effectively explores matters of faith and devotion on an intimate level, surrounding you with a multitude of people, each of whom navigates evolving religious turmoil in his or her own way. The chaos of the world you are thrust into explores the usual Dragon Age themes--the struggle between mages and templars, the role of the Grey Wardens in holding off demonic blights, and the political machinations of the Orlesian elite among them. But the Chantry takes a central role, and the ways in which the dialogue and gameplay decisions allow you to express your own views of faith make Inquisition the most personal game in the series, which is a wonderful revelation given how much real estate it depicts.

What a shame to spoil such a pretty place with magic and swords.
What a shame to spoil such a pretty place with magic and swords.

It is from tragedy and chaos that the Inquisition is reborn, and it is only appropriate that a fledgling movement appoint a fledgling leader--you--as its head. You tailor your Inquisitor in all sorts of wonderful ways using the game's intricate character creation system; you may even choose from a couple of different voices, even though the character is fully acted. You can also create a Qunari protagonist for the first time in the series, though you needn't mourn the options you didn't choose should you prefer a Dalish elf: your available party members, three of whom can join you at any given time, are a diverse group, and include Iron Bull, a no-nonsense, laid-back Qunari warrior who avoids becoming the gruff, gravelly-voiced stereotype he could so easily have been.

In fact, Dragon Age: Inquisition's characters typically avoid the cliches we've come to know in video games (and in fiction in general), which is much of what makes getting to know them, even returning ones, such a pleasure. Cassandra is primarily known for her interrogation of Varric, that dwarven teller of tall of tall tales, in Dragon Age II; in Inquisition, her stubbornness takes a beautifully human shape. She is driven not by power, but by law, and as she examines her faith during a time of upheaval, her questioning is poignant. That she believes is her most admirable trait, though it's this same trait that has her frequently confronting Varric with such aggression. Hearing the two bicker as they follow you across verdant meadows and through dim caverns is one of Inquisition's highlights.

The ways in which the dialogue and gameplay decisions allow you to express your own views of faith make Inquisition the most personal game in the series.

Meet Iron Bull. He may or may not be pleased to meet you.
Meet Iron Bull. He may or may not be pleased to meet you.

Of course, keeping these two in your party means leaving others behind, and it's hard not to miss Varric's hairy chest, which is almost a character unto itself. I grew to appreciate a mysterious spirit named Cole most of all, not just because of his talent with dual daggers, but for his overwhelming compassion for others. He reads minds, often communicating the thoughts and emotions he uncovers in a stream-of-consciousness poetry, fragmented and alliterative. Cole comforts people in need, but wipes memories of him from their minds, in a touching show of selflessness.

Dragon Age: Inquisition treats its characters with great respect; Iron Bull's description of sex among the Qunari is as honest as his admiration of a transgender mercenary is honorable. Your choices when speaking to your cohorts, as well as when adventuring, meet with their disapproval or approval, sometimes even when the character in question isn't there to witness the event. (It's odd to be immediately notified that Varric appreciates how you have destroyed a deposit of the dangerous mineral red lyrium even when he isn't at your side when it occurs.) Romance might ensue, presuming you earn the favor of the character you most fancy, though there is always the chance of a broken heart. As is the case with most BioWare games, many previous choices are inescapable; encouraging my lover to make the world a better place ultimately led to our split. In that moment, I recalled losing Alastair to a greater cause in Dragon Age: Origins; how appropriate that the best experiences in the series thus far would be similarly tinged with sorrow.

It is through dialogue choices and forking gameplay options that you become the Inquisitor you wish to be. You even sit upon your throne and cast judgment on those that wronged you--and then deal with the repercussions when certain people and factions don't like your choices. You might sentence a renegade mage to tranquility, only to face negativity from magical forces that fear your wrath--or, if you are a mage, see you as a hypocrite. Some of these choices play out on the war table, which you view along with your Inquisition allies from overhead. Here, you select missions that might reward you with influence and power, or earn you metals and herbs to use for crafting new armor and weapons, or for outfitting your base of operations with new decor. Once a mission is selected, you select an approach--usually diplomatic, surreptitious, or forceful--and then wait for word to come back and rewards to flow in. This is Dragon Age's answer to Assassin's Creed: Brotherhood: you assign tasks to your allies, and they return, hopefully, with news of good fortune.

Veilfire is a new addition that allows you to see hidden elven writing. It's like real fire. Only magic.
Veilfire is a new addition that allows you to see hidden elven writing. It's like real fire. Only magic.

Your choices from previous games are reflected as well, though if you've decided to move to a new platform, you can visit the game's official website and tailor the world in advance. Some references to those choices are entirely too conspicuous, as if to scream "Hey, remember that thing you did? Do you?" Fortunately, not every contextual detour is so blatant. Your race and class are frequently noted in passing, and they are reflected in how people speak to you and react to your presence. As a Dalish elf, the idea that I could truly be The Herald of Andraste (the Christlike title I was granted) was blasphemy among many; as a mage, the Templars did not greet me with enthusiasm. At one stage, I was invited to hobnob with the Orlesian elite, a suspicious crowd that grew even more suspicious in my elven presence.

The mission that puts you face to face with the nobility of Orlais, as well as with the disturbing masks they donned, is somewhat of a slog--a lot of walking and talking and listening, but rather little in the way of epiphany. It's also an important one, in that it portrays the diplomatic aspect of the Inquisitor's role in this world. You are a spy, an ambassador, and a combatant, and this thematic diversity is reflected in the gameplay. You are also an explorer, spending most of your time traversing Dragon Age: Inquisition's expansive spaces. You move through the meadows, deserts, and stormy coasts from a third-person perspective, uncovering new areas, unlocking new camps for resting, and, of course, crushing the apostates, great bears, and wyverns that dare taunt you.

It is through dialogue choices and forking gameplay options that you become the Inquisitor you wish to be.

Closing rifts is your primary concern, at least in the early going.
Closing rifts is your primary concern, at least in the early going.

Combat is likely to be Dragon Age: Inquisition's most divisive feature. It is fun and colorful, and if you bemoaned the loss of the tactical camera in Dragon Age II, you'll be glad to know it is back, and available even on consoles, allowing you to direct the action from above. The tactical camera can be awkward, getting caught up on objects and sticking a bit too close to the action. On the other, the ability on consoles to use a single button to forward time instead of constantly pausing and unpausing is an intuitive tweak. But unless you're fighting roaring dragons or imposing bosses, you probably won't need the tactical camera very often, should you play on medium difficulty. Instead, you perform your standard attack, which costs no stamina, while throwing in more powerful abilities for dealing additional damage and controlling crowds.

In the meanwhile, your companions perform adequately enough; you can somewhat customize their AI routines as you could in previous games, but there's little need for micromanagement in this way. Most healing magic is gone, so you rely on health potions that replenish in camps and towns, and most tactical considerations, like throwing bombs and drinking draughts, can be dealt with from the default point of view. Ultimately, it's a good system that works well in both wide open spaces and cramped caves, and Inquisition is certainly the most fluid of the Dragon Age games. There are challenges out there, but nail-biting battles aren't common, though hard mode is always there if you want one, and dragon battles demand your concentration regardless.

Certain key boss battles aren't a comfortable fit; boss attack patterns sometimes require immediate reactions, but party members in the midst of combat don't respond until the current action is complete, at which point it might be too late to avoid damage. These occasions are the exception, however, and not the rule, and easy or not, there's no doubting the action's diversity. Because you can directly control the Inquisitor as well as any party member, there's never a need to stick with magic, or a two-handed blade, if you prefer to inhabit Varric's shoes and shoot his prized bow Bianca for a while.

Even deserts provide rest to the weary, if you know where to look.
Even deserts provide rest to the weary, if you know where to look.

Journeying is an absolute delight. You discover astralariums that hone in on constellations, requiring you to perform a connect-the-stars minigame to reveal the myth behind them. You peer through contraptions that allow you to survey the landscape and identify shimmering shards, which you then may collect. Such activities initially come across as busywork, only to be revealed as keys to new dungeons and temples. Meanwhile, your work at the war table often results in new areas being revealed, and previously accessible areas opening to you. And so you blindly venture into a new cavern, which might hold spiders, phantasms seeking respite, or puzzles that lead to even greater mysteries. There are decisions to make in the field, as well. I chose to betray my legacy and pursue untold magical knowledge, only to offer that knowledge to another when I feared the potential negative repercussions. There are paths I look back on with wonder and regret. What if I had gained the ancient ally I had forsaken? What if I had abandoned my selfish quest for wisdom and instead paid no mind to the power-hungry mage bending my ear?

And so a world builds around you. You blow a horn that sounds out across the land, signaling to your comrades that a fortification is cleared of enemies and theirs to inhabit. You find notes and read books, and they build a narrative picture remarkably consistent with the game's sights and sounds. In Dragon Age: Inquisition, gameplay and story are not separate objects, but inextricable entities. The story you create in your mind by the very act of adventuring, and the one BioWare tells by way of its events and characters, have equal footing. Dragon Age: Inquisition separates its expansive regions and makes them accessible on its world map; it is not one massive space, as an Elder Scrolls game would be. But it feels no less impressive for it, nor does the storytelling suffer from the sheer size of the world and the sheer amount of content. These elements form a large, coherent, self-consistent picture.

Well, it is called
Well, it is called "Dragon Age," after all.

No Caption Provided

This enormous and attractive picture reveals blemishes should you look closely enough. Rare sound bugs, awkward jumping puzzles, characters that pop into view, awkward cutscene transitions, and weird clipping might briefly distract you, but their sum total amounts to little. 85 hours after I started Dragon Age: Inquisition, the story reached a conclusion, and yet I still stare at all the areas still dark on the map. You can customize the keep that serves as your base of operations, and I look at the list of related unlockables, most of which still remain inaccessible. I wonder about Vivienne, the haughty mage that joined my cause, yet whom I barely know. I look at the small list of potions I have unlocked, and get anxious, wanting to rush into the Hinterlands or the Storm Coast, hoping to find plans for more. I ponder these schools of combat I have been told of, and the quests that (I think) will add them to my party's repertoire upon completion. I long to see and do all that I missed, not because it's there--but because I am confident it's worth seeing and doing.

You spend several of those hours at the crafting tables, creating and enhancing armor and weapons using the metals and herbs you collect along the way. If there's anything that slows down exploration, it's the frequent searching and collection of elfroot and serpentstone. You don't actively spend skill points in core attributes like constitution and ability, but you can still affect them when constructing gear for you and your cohorts. I miss Dragon Age: Origins' Sandal, the lovable lug all too eager to enhance your armor with a simple call of "Enchantment?" But the system he services didn't go as deep as Inquisition's, which had me carefully hoarding the rarest resources so that I might use them wisely. That spark-spewing dragon wasn't going to die a natural death, after all.

This is my inquisitor. What does yours look like?
This is my inquisitor. What does yours look like?

You might also spend a few hours in Dragon Age: Inquisition's cooperative multiplayer mode, which recalls that of Mass Effect 3, in that you have access only to a few different archetypes, and gradually earn more characters, more skills, and more items to boost you and your teammates in battle. (Of course, you can also purchase loot caches if you wish to hurry the process. It wouldn't be a modern big-budget game without a raft of microtransactions.) Matches are straightforward sojourns through three different maps focused exclusively on eliminating enemies, and while the enemies may differ, the pace is straightforward. Mass Effect 3 garnered a dedicated online following; Dragon Age: Inquisition's moment-to-moment gameplay doesn't have the same immediacy and spark, making it a fine bit of light entertainment, but unlikely to inspire the same devotion.

Inquisition's characters and world, on the other hand, recall the grand gestures of the original Dragon Age, even though the game as a whole is so structurally different to its predecessors. It offers the thrill of discovery and the passion of camaraderie. It features a glee club called The Sing-Quisition, and a dwarf with writer's block. It establishes connections with its world in big ways and small, with the sight of a titanous temple and the smirk of an Orlesian commander in love. Dragon Age: Inquisition is a wonderful game and a lengthy pilgrimage to a magical world with vital thematic ties to one we already know.

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The Good
Wonderful cast of interesting and relatable characters
Overarching narrative and diverse environments create a cohesive world
Choices that lead to adventure, triumph, and heartbreak
Lots of big areas to explore, with lots of great secrets to uncover
Fantastic balance between exploration, combat, story, and customization
The Bad
Combat requires relatively little strategy
9
Superb
About GameSpot's Reviews
Other Platform Reviews for Dragon Age: Inquisition

About the Author

Kevin VanOrd has played every major Dragon Age release. (Admittedly, he's never touched a Dragon Age on mobile platforms, or on Facebook.) His favorite party member in the series is Varric. He does not miss his previous Dragon Age love interest, Anders. (That jerk!) He spent 85 hours on the campaign, and several more in multiplayer. He played on Xbox One and PlayStation 4; this review will be updated to reflect the PC version once he has spent enough time with that version.
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thevacinstaller

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This is one of those games that where my experience of the game ended up being a 6 or a 7. It doesn't happen often with gamespot/giant bomb as they usually right in line with my quality expectations.

Bioware --- for the love of the Space Jesus Sheppard ---- Stop making open world games.

Precision crafted linear world design with the nifty illusion of choice/open world is your JAM!

We really need a bioware intervention. Wake up! Come back!

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gabmost

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Edited By gabmost

How to explain 9 for Inquisition and 6 for Andromeda, games that have the same style of level design that Bioware started using great worlds, but the second is an evolution of practically everything in relation to the first, better plot, more justified protagonist, better non-reused villain, much better secondary missions, infinitely better multiplayer, etc. ? LOL

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GNS

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OK, at first play-through, I uninstalled it after two-days, because of those damned Hinterlands. After half a year, I decided to re-install it again, and play it. Well, this time I uninstalled it after 30+ hours... The pros:

1. Frostbyte engine. It can create really good looking environment that you can calmly run on high with Intel I5-3330 CPU 3.3 Ghz, AMD Radeon HD 7850 2 GB VRAM, 16 GB RAM (i.e, with a PC that it's actually last generation).

2. The lore. I found myself enjoying codex entries more than I did the main quest.

The cons:

1. Too big world. And I mean it. The world is huge and vast. Divided into separate maps, which in themselves are vast as well. With mountain and terrains, which is hard to cross. For some a big world might be a good thing, and I agree, but you need to have something to do in that big world. Now, on every map, the same side quests: collect shards, kill some NPCs, gather their belongings, sell their belongings to gather money, solve Astrarium puzzles, close rifts. All these things in a huge environment, which is very tedious to do, especially when you are doing the same stuff over and over again for the hundred time already, and it seems there's no end to it.

2. Character faces. While Frostback engine is good for builind environments, but... my God... those characters look like wax figures from Madam Tussod's. It's unerving to watch them speak and walk during their interactions, because their motions are unnatural, they're 3D modelled manquins doing the same motions over and over again.

3. The plot. Well, either you like it, or you don't. After 30 hrs of gameplay (and I'm not sure that I've even reached the middle of it), found out that the big baddy is a Magister of Tewinter who assaulted the Heavan's throne thousands of years ago. And he wants to rebuild the glory of Tewinter. Gee, I wonder how well he'll succeed with his plan...

4. Gameplay. My god. Freaking tedious chorefest. If you're playing with a shield and a sword (regular tank), all you have to do is taunt and shield-bash your way while your party member, who is a mage and an expert in pyromancy, simply burns everything in its wake. And this kind of gameplay is throughout the game (except when fighting flying and fire breathing dragons, then you have to change tactics, i.e. get to mages that specialise in ice magic).

Verdict: 5/10

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Willywill

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@gns: I'm reinstalling Dragon Age Inqusition as we speak. I bought it on day 1 and played on and off for a little while then stopped. I think they should have made the world smaller and went for more quality over quantity. I love open world games but it seems every game is open world now. I'm going to concentrate on the story this time instead of just exploring and doing my own thing.

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Antarte

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It is impossible to, objectively, give an 8 to Dragon Age 2, or a 9 to Inquisition, they have turned its franchise from RPG to ARPG, is a complete change of genre, but trying to maintain the RPG mechanics ridiculously... (also Diablo 2 has 8.5 while Diablo 3 has 9? really? a game that turns the franchise from ARPG to Hack'n Slash?).

To evaluate games as: "yes, is a complete change, but is funny" are we, the users, we can put notes based on our feelings, but journalists must evaluate objectively, a game that changes its genre is not only an attempt to scam, means also that will be "fun" for certain target, but not for the original players, means leaving behind the original players that made it great.

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Willywill

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@Antarte: This right here. Dragon Age Origins was a spiritual successor to Balders Gate. One of the best rpg games ever made. We went from a rpg game to a hack and slash something.

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Saeed38th

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Great story. Great depth (map and characters). Nice to have many companions to fight with. Combat is meh (canned animations that get old after a while) .... After a while you just play to see the story unfold. I would like to play it again, but I can't bring myself to it. There's just not enough variation there for a 2nd playthrough, like it would be in a game like Fallout 3 New Vegas or something .... #mytake

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CRAPCOM1926

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Is this game really good? I want to change my witcher 3 and someone offer me this game, is that good? is it worthy to change it for witcher 3?

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streamline

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@CRAPCOM1926: Not if you liked Dragon Age: Origins. Big fans of that game are severely disappointed in DAI. I'm tempted to buy it for $15 now for the Cyber Monday sale, but I was so let down by it that I can't get myself to. The NPCs and side stories have no heart or depth. I'm disappointed that KVO rated this game so high and left that out in his review.

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Gelugon_baat

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Edited By Gelugon_baat

I get the impression that the game is a hybrid of Xenoblade and Skyrim, and that's not necessarily great in my eyes. In the playthrough that I watched, the player didn't even suffer a single party-wipe, and the dude is stupidly reckless.

Also, the early versions of the game, post-launch, is rather janky, especially on the consoles. Slow-loading textures and model polygons, sometimes missing audio and wonky camera, to cite some examples of technical issues.

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Gelugon_baat

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I do acknowledge BioWare's motivations for including the gala/ballroom scenario in the Orlesian palace in the game; such "fancy nest-of-vipers" scenarios had been in pen-and-paper RPGs, such as those made by Fantasy Flight, and I think that BioWare is trying to do something like that.

However, it won't gel well with every player, especially those who are not familiar with pen-and-paper RPGs. Having the player investigate and fight things away from other people while requiring the player to regularly visit the ballroom to maintain Court Approval will be a displeasure to players who do not like such juggling.

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Gelugon_baat

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Edited By Gelugon_baat

When the player character mounts a horse, the other party members simply disappear. How jarring.

Can anyone confirm whether this bug (a monster model getting caught in level geometry) still happens in the game? It happened in the EA Access stage.

Also, I recall that someone has said below that some of the gameplay had turned all too much like that found in MMOs. I agree, at least where the trope of repetitive busywork with little gratifying reward is concerned.

Here is an illustrative example, where the player turns in herbs, one batch after another, with the same dialogue being recycled. Also, note the animation glitch. (This does not appear to occur in the EA Access stage. It occurred after launch. I don't know if this has been patched, but it should be obvious here that BioWare had not considered the possibility that players would do silly things, like jumping while initiating a dialogue.)

Also, sometimes bad dialogue camera, and cutscene glitch. Seems like BioWare has learned nothing from its earlier days.

At least the music video moments are amusing. :P

Speaking of which, it seems to me that the only bits worth knowing about this game are the cinematic moments and perhaps the designs of characters' personalities and inclinations (I, for one, was expecting Iron Bull to be little more than a meat-head, which he is not).

Yet, this means that this game is worth watching, but not worth playing.

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thescrybbler

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Kevin, that is a favorable review, and well-written.

As a game designer (Rocket Science/3DO/Microsoft) I was much less tolerant than you of some of the bugs (especially in Tactical View), camera issues, and writing problems: http://gamewriter.videogamewriter.com/game-writing/videogame-review-dragon-age-inquisition/

I think part of my dislike (and your affection) comes from our different levels of previous Dragon Age exposure. There are some real UI clunkers in this game, and I was incensed that I couldn't switch thieves from bow to dagger in the course of combat. That, IMHO, really nerfs any claim to tactical combat legitimacy. Would be interested to hear your opinions on these issues!

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gunnmetal

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this game is not a 9, my god im at the stronghold ans i only have the same shitty armor and weapon where are the nice weapons and armour..

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Jimbowesker

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Edited By Jimbowesker

To comment on all the negative responses I am seeing, I will defend Kevin in saying that maybe he actually really does feel this game Is superb. And there are others who agree. On my first attempt to play through this, I did not give it a chance, immediately putting it to the side for more seemingly appealing games, but I decided to give it one more shot the other day and this time I was riveted. There is really a lot to appreciate from this game and SO VERY much detail and work has been put in that you have to admire, even if you haven't come to this realization yet. I know there are some who aren't going to like it and I understand that, but I actually gave it the time of day and was quickly sucked into it's dark world, and 110 hours later, was left still exploring the world finding new artifacts and new powerful weapons. Say what you will, but I have to respect that. I believe the gaming world today would be much better off with games that will stick with you longer than 20-30-40 hours, i.e. Witcher 3, Dragon Age: Inquisition, and actually earn your $60. I hope to see more titles like this!

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tomenigma

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@Jimbowesker so very true. DA:I was a hard game to get used to especially after finishing superb Witcher 3 However, DA:I offers so many worlds, characters, dialogue to perfectly immerse yourself for hours. I admire the amount of work went into crafting this game. Looking forward to DLCs and next DA in the series.

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solatron

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Kevin VanOrd is a paid reviewer. It's so wrong giving a misleading review about this.

Shame!
Shame!
Shame!

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ProtossX

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fire this paid reviewer gave this trash 9/10 ive played better free games on my phone than this turd


its sitting at 58/100 user metacritic rating yeah nice 9/10 you slob somebody fire this guy no wonder he stayed on after gertsmann didn't sell out while this van ord guy continues to sell out

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CraZkid37

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For those who had a lot of problems, what platform did you play it on? Was it the 360/PS3? If so, I'm not surprised there were issues - ports are terrible for those consoles. I'm hoping these issues weren't on the One.

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Robsonbmw

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I can't get into this game. Many of the things that bother most of the people here, bother me as well.

The main thing that puts me off is the very generic lore and plot. Even the first dragon age felt so generic ( Grey wardens fighting with evil dark spawn bla bla bla ), that I stopped playing it after maybe 10 hours. I couldn't be bothered with DA2 but I guess I've bought into the hype with Inquisition. My problem with DA3 is that I don't really care what happens to either the world, templars or mages. In fact I don't care if Mr Rodgers invades Hinterlands with his army of talking trees. The whole world and the struggle feel forced and feel like someone had created that world in 5 minutes in a diner between an appetizer and the main course.

I'm an avid ME trilogy fan. Mass Effect series is something of a holy Grail to me and I have finished that trilogy multiple times simply because my connection with the world and characters ( Garrus!!! ) was so strong, that I felt massive void each time I finished the story. So massive I had to go back and relive everything once again. Similar feeling to one when you've been a part of a great guild in an MMO and that guild disbands.


The whole gameplay is nothing I haven't seen before. Multiple fetch quests, unintuitive gui, chaotic, hack & slash like combat and that constant feeling that I don't really wanna be a part of that world.

It's an rpg after all. I want to actually care about the world that I'm supposed to save, or the characters I wanna do that with.

DA3 is just one massive time hog, that wants to do everything at once but as a result is being one massive time sink, with plenty to do, but nothing that actually leaves any lasting impression on you.

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Pasheg

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I mostly agree with a reviewer (and disagree with those who bash the game). My 5 cents on the (supposed) shortcomings of the game:

- Little strategy in combat is true if you play on normal difficulty and/or use a sturdy main character, such as a sword+shield Champion or a Knight Enchanter. Set a higher difficulty, choose a squishy class, and things will change.

- Too much time required for collecting herbs, metals and doing pointless repetitive quests ("collect X items scattered all over the map") is a large drawback. This type of annoying busywork is a sign of lazy game design. However, most of these quests are easily avoidable, given that you'll hit the soft level cap sooner rather than later. Still, you indeed need a lot of raw materials.

- The zone levels seem strange. Most of the areas/quests are centered around levels 10-14, the same goes for the main quests. You'll get past this range in a blink, and still will be forced to fight with weaklings and get the low level loot over and over. In short, the game is "not so secretly" optimized for those who rush through the main storyline and a few side quests, not for those who want to explore more.

- The game is an extremely buggy console port (on PC). It's slow, often randomly crashes, the controls are clunky. Most importantly, you have ONLY 8 ACTIVE SKILLS available! Is it Mass Effect or a real RPG after all? In fact, you'll have the action bar full by lvl 10 or so, so further leveling is only done for the passives (or you could replace your active skills with more powerful ones, when applicable). This limitation immediately removes 1/2 of the tactical opportunities and forces you to play the same way over and over.

- There's no way to customize your teammate's behavior. It immediately becomes apparent in any boss fight, when your ranged party members rush right into the the fray (e.g. in the dragon's mouth), no matter how you position them. Your orders like "stay where you are" are generally ignored.

- Hard difficulty is overall much easier than Normal in DA:Origins. Also the game is easier than DA2. All for console casuals, right?

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skyrer_loupawra

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How could the reviewer not even mention the questdesign as a con? This game has probabaly the worst questdesign of any game evr made and this isn't even worth to mention? I'm so sick of this paid reviews. Shame on you Gamespot

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abhirajgoldy

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i loved the overall game but the end part is very underwhelming, very-very lame final quest,i was expecting it to be epic but left hugely disappointed

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skyrer_loupawra

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how could this game get a 9? Except fot the characters everything else is bad or mediocre. Can't believe the score

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Antarte

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Edited By Antarte

I can't understand... Dragon Age Origins is RPG but DA2 and Inquisition were changed their genera to Action-RPG. Those... HUGE... details doesn't weight enough during the evaluation?

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ronan32

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The most overrated rpg of all time. The game is rubbish..full of fetch question and collection tasks. 5/10

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SipahSalar

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I have only one question, how is the story?

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Cobwebmaster

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I think the rating is based on the concept art and the general structure of the game which is in terms of achievement outstanding, the practical experience of playing from start to finish puts for me a Bioware fan since the days of BG a wholly different slant on things. I think the reality of playing is one of a laborious task, and that the game struggles under the load of it's ambitions to be the best at everything RPG, open world and multiplayer. To complete the entire game becomes a test of endurance which for me does not factor into my idea of enjoyment at all. Good RPG is diluted by the sheer weight of other experiences and average or poor attempts to capture gameplayers of such powerhouse games as for example Skyrim. There is no where near the replayability appeal. I rate it an 8 out of 10 and not as either enjoyably immersive, or as much fun as it's two predecessors which rate a 9.5 (DAO) and a 9 (DA2) in my book

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xavroche

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Edited By xavroche

I don't think it's fair to say that the combat lacked strategy when Kevin admitted in his review that he played on easy or normal: "There are challenges out there, but nail-biting battles aren't common, though hard mode is always there if you want one, and dragon battles demand your concentration regardless."


When you start a new game it clearly explains what the difficulty levels equate to and that easy and normal are for people who don't want a challenge in combat but rather want to play through the story. I finished the game on both hard and nightmare and in the latter combat is very tactical and challenging, at least until the higher levels and with certain specializations that are a little overpowered.


This game has its flaws, don't get me wrong, but I don't think you should criticize the complexity of combat when you voluntarily choose a difficulty level that nerfs it.


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deactivated-57bcc1891a93a

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@xavroche i love hard mode, but sometimes it's just a pause-fest because I have to wrestle with bad game design, stupid party AI etc. fighting a level 11-13 dragon at level 20 was so ridiculous I quit until they fix some major issues. steer clear if you're expecting the control and potential for strategy you had in Origins. on the bright side, you don't level up much from simply killing monsters, becoming OP far too soon.

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waterhornet

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@xavroche if he played on anything more than normal difficulty he probably woul dhave been at the game too long to get the review done in time. 85 hours in a game at easy/normal difficulty means there is a LOT of stuff to do. We want reviews on time, not weeks late because the reviewer is struggling with the difficulty. : ) Can't wait to get my hands on a copy of this game...I've been waiting too long to take the plunge as I still have to complete Origins and II since my HDD crashed and I lost my save games. Oh well, I have no problem going through Origins again, though I'm not looking forward to playing II with it's recycled set pieces and "console-y" feeling.

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TheBruuz

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Edited By TheBruuz

7,5/10

A lot of content, rich story, good voice acting, good music, cool settings, good atmosphere.

Simple combat.

Not the most flattering character models, quite horrible character animations and poor mise-en-scene in cut-scenes.

Most horrible jump mechanics in a game...ever.

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REmporio

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Love it - game is fantastic. Best looking console game on PS4


<a href="http://gamestar-addict.com/">pc games</a>

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l0ne_wanderer

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@gnomemory @l0ne_wanderer @polishkid99 8/10 if you dont mind mindless action MMO type gameplay. The combat does require a bit of skill and planning.

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gnomemory

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Edited By gnomemory

@l0ne_wanderer @polishkid99 6/10 ?

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gnomemory

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It was probably one of the most-overrated game of 2014. I am sorry I've bought it at full price, because it didn't delivered what I was expecting.


It was fun for a while, but after 55 hours of playing it I was so glad I've managed to finish it.


Things I hate about this game:


- They went with the philosophy: Quantity over Quality. The game is huge and empty of quality content. You will be basically playing 70% time a Single Player MMO accumulating POWER - the thing that enables you to advance the story. So the leader of the mighty Inquisition will be hunting piglets because their skin is a crafting material, and will gather 10 of that and 10 of that for a guy who wants some of those.


- Companions are nice, but their quests are dumb. Remember the cool part of Mass Effect when you were helping your companions to make peace with their past. Guess what, your companion quests in DA:I are the same fetch quests you get in MMOs.


- The game is a shallow RPG. What you do in the WAR room actually doesn't really matter, except the 10 seconds cutscenes at the end of the game.


- The skill tree is shallow. Basically each class has an over-powered specialization that will make the game very easy (Knight Enchanter anybody), and other specializations that will make the game moderately easy. So if you follow the basic rule of RPGs, and not disperse the skill points too much, you will inevitable become invincible (even on harder difficulties!).


- There are 3 types of enemies and 1 or 2 type of bosses. Enemy Type 1 - ranged, never moves, Enemy Type 2 - Attacks your tank, Enemy Type 3 - A rogue attacking your mage (sometimes). The bosses are even more boring, especially the dragons.


- The story is at its best mediocre. There are so many holes in the intrigue, it isn't funny at some point.


There are so many rotten things with this game...



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waterhornet

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@gnomemory So...basically like almost every other BioWare game?

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evillec

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This game has no imagination, It was torturous to finish.

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velcroboy

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For those looking for a PC review...

http://www.gamespot.com/dragon-age-inquisition/user-reviews/2200-12635723/

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falboe90

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If you want to play on PC, i recommend crack v4 which works great. More information: http://www.hacksgen.com/dragon-age-inquisition-crack-v4-updates-8-dlc/

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deactivated-57bcc1891a93a

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@falboe90 you scammers should put some space between your messages.

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StateEnemy1

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Tv Tropes at least knows best here despite my growing doubts of it; this game is OVERRATED!

Dragon Age: Inquisition More Info

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  • First Released Nov 18, 2014
    released
    • PC
    • PlayStation 3
    • + 3 more
    • PlayStation 4
    • Xbox 360
    • Xbox One
    Dragon Age: Inquisition is the third entry in BioWare's epic fantasy role-playing game trilogy.
    8
    Average Rating1297 Rating(s)
    Please Sign In to rate Dragon Age: Inquisition
    Developed by:
    BioWare, Electronic Arts
    Published by:
    Electronic Arts, BioWare
    Genre(s):
    Action, Third-Person, Adventure, 3D, Role-Playing
    Content is generally suitable for ages 17 and up. May contain intense violence, blood and gore, sexual content and/or strong language.
    Mature
    Blood, Intense Violence, Nudity, Sexual Content, Strong Language