Review

Deus Ex: Mankind Divided Review

  • First Released Aug 23, 2016
    released
  • PC

Give Me Deus Ex.

The way I play Deus Ex: Mankind Divided may not be the same way you play it. When I step into the shoes of Adam Jensen, I avoid conflict, drink all the alcohol I find, and stop bad guys from doing terrible things by releasing pheromones into the air and then asking politely. I like to sneak through areas without hurting anyone if possible, and prefer to knock someone out and hide their body if I really need them out of the way. But occasionally, I want to role-play a cyberpunk bad-ass who doesn't take trash from anybody, letting my magnum revolver do the talking when I enter a room. Deus Ex lets me do all these things, and doesn't punish me for solving problems one way over another. The series is characteristically defined by giving you choices--a variety of ways to tackle given situations like armed conflict, social interactions, and branches in storyline. Mankind Divided is no different. There is no wrong way to play, and the game rewards you for achieving things with your personally preferred method, no matter what that may involve.

Every obstacle in the cyberpunk world of Mankind Divided has multiple solutions, provided you've invested in certain abilities. For conflict scenarios, there are more than enough tools provided for a direct approach--a variety of lethal and non-lethal guns, grenades and ammo which fire and explode wonderfully, and cybernetic augmentations that can give you temporary buffs like heavy armor or slowing down time. Shooting controls well--it feels effortless to transition from first-person aiming into third-person cover mechanics, change ammo types quickly, and smoothly line up headshots with iron sights. Entering a room while firing a shotgun, then finishing off the last couple of enemies with a lethal takedown feels exceptional.

No Caption Provided

Alternatively, there are robust stealth mechanics that let you slip quickly and accurately from cover to cover, see enemy sightlines, and let you turn temporarily invisible. If enemies hear or see you they'll transition into a suspicious state where they will attempt to confirm your presence before turning hostile, and this can be used to your advantage. Throwing objects or intentionally making a noise can lure a guard to a particular area, letting you silently take them out or slip past them unnoticed. You can also use hacking skills and have fun taking advantage of the game’s futuristic setting, turning sentry robots, automated turrets, and the environment against aggressors without drawing attention to Jensen himself.

But no matter how you decide to go about solving a problem, there is always a thrill when you succeed, and the game dishes out experience points no matter which actions you take. This means killing enemies is just as satisfying as slipping past them without raising suspicion. Punching through a wall is as fulfilling as stealing a keycard and just using the door. There is no superior way to complete a task.

Killing enemies is just as satisfying as slipping past them without raising suspicion. Punching through a wall is as fulfilling as stealing a keycard and just using the door.

During investigation scenarios, the direct approach may require you to manually hack into computer terminals in order to procure the information you need, or craft tools to do the hacking for you. If you have the patience though, coercing knowledge out of a citizen or spending time snooping around for clues can also provide what you need. It's refreshing to play a game where different routes can not only be equally successful, but flexible as well. Being an expert in one field doesn't necessarily lock you out of another.

Mankind Divided introduces a handful of new augmentation abilities for Jensen on top of those introduced in the previous game, Human Revolution. Some of these new augs are more interesting than others though; Remote Hacking is invaluable for disabling automated obstacles at a distance, and Icarus Dash is a powerful tool for discreet traversal. However the TESLA, PEPS, and Nanoblade abilities achieve similar effects to some of the game's more conventional weapons--they stun and kill enemies from a distance. There are some advantages to using them, but most of the time I wished I had spent points elsewhere.

What's interesting about these new abilities is that with their introduction comes with a caveat: to equip them, players must disable one of their other augmentations to avoid putting strain on Jensen’s predominantly cybernetic body, and risking negative effects. Initially, this "Overclocking" system makes for tantalizing dilemmas. The necessity of permanently disabling some skills in order to power others early in the campaign made me stop and seriously think about how I would be handling situations in the future. Not all augments can be disabled (you can’t disable your HUD, for instance) but when I decided to enable Remote Hacking, I made the tough decision to disable something seemingly essential--the ability to mark and track enemies.

However, as I earned more skill points I decided to experiment, activating multiple new abilities at once without disabling others. The unfortunate revelation was that despite characters and the augmentation menu telling me I was at a critical status and needed to disable more abilities, I experienced no serious detrimental effects that made completing missions any more difficult than usual--a brief radar glitch was the worst I saw. Even more annoyingly, a later plot event re-enabled my once permanently disabled talents. Although being able to unlock and use all abilities in a single playthrough of Deus Ex is near impossible, it was disappointing to see a consequential, weighty choice made inconsequential.

Mankind Divided continues with the series' portrayal of a cyberpunk dystopia with a focus on the politics around people with cybernetic implants, and the subsequent implications on the definitions of humanity. The plot involves countless government bodies, corporations, security forces, underground resistances, even the Illuminati--and the events of Mankind Divided frame suspicion on literally every organisation and individual it introduces. This makes it impossible to trust any one character other than Jensen as you search for evidence revealing the motives and masterminds behind a number of terrorist acts. Deciding which organisation to aid and which to deceive during pivotal plot moments is grueling because everything is so unyieldingly grey. The world and attitudes of characters can vary depending on your choices and actions, and even the game's dozen or so side missions take dramatic twists and press you to make difficult decisions--many involve the ethics of hypotheticals our present-day society has yet to encounter--and there are no right answers.

It's easy to become completely engrossed in this morally ambiguous chess game, with so many unknown factors lurking beneath the surface. But the lack of a clear antagonist or driving purpose at any one time can lead to temporary disillusionment, with no one enemy ever standing in the metaphorical crosshairs for too long. The upside to this is that Mankind Divided doesn't feature the ill-received boss battles that appeared in Human Revolution, and remains purely as a series of increasingly challenging infiltration and investigation scenarios, all of which can be solved in the manner of your choosing. The pace of the game doesn't feel like one that's defined by a series of climactic acts, but a constant burn of tension and a chase for knowledge as mainline missions, hub exploration, and optional side missions bleed into one another.

The world of Deus Ex is an easy one to get completely absorbed in. The city hubs, all based in Prague, are where you'll spend most of your time and are stunningly well-realised. The streets are full of life and bold neon advertising. The futuristic buildings constructed among old-world European architecture and dilapidated housing make the city believable. You'll revisit locations and walk the same routes regularly in Mankind Divided, gaining an intimate knowledge of the streets and structures, and this knowledge is incredibly useful and satisfying to draw upon as new situations arise. One hub, Útulek Station, is a stunningly claustrophobic and oppressive multi-level slum, filled with ramshackle apartments and dense marketplaces which made me stop every few feet just to soak it all in.

No Caption Provided

Exploring these environments for information and scavenging for items is also immensely enjoyable. Spaces are filled with character, densely packed with discoveries to make about its inhabitants, and are exceptionally curated with subtlety. You might push unremarkable boxes on a shelf aside to pleasantly discover someone has hidden some rainy day cash behind them. You might look behind someone's couch to find that's where they stash a pistol, just in case. You may notice that despite his constant, over-the-top broody demeanor, Adam Jensen absolutely loves eating colorful, sugary cereal. Additionally, a portion of the game’s side missions are not explicitly marked, and only found by going out of your way to talk to certain people you may have otherwise run past. Mankind Divided rewards exploration, and its locations are delightful to explore.

Mankind Divided rewards exploration, and its locations are delightful to explore.

Mankind Divided also includes an asymmetrical online-only competitive mode called Breach. Breach uses the first-person combat, stealth and remote hacking mechanics of Deus Ex in brief, visually abstracted challenge missions with a focus on score-chasing, speedrunning, and beating other players. Augmentation abilities are also present, but Breach uses a slightly modified skill tree, and enforces stricter limitations--the player is able to unlock every upgrade, but they can only equip a limited number before going into each mission.

The tone of Breach is very different to the main campaign, with the emphasis not so much on the breadth of options available to you, but taking the path of least resistance. After playing through Adam Jensen's story as a Pacifist, Breach gave me much more license to experiment without consequence--racing around like a maniac, shooting non-human enemies and causing general chaos as I tried to climb the speedrun leaderboard. Breach mode also incorporates a career levelling system, similar to other multiplayer games, where you can earn "Booster Packs" containing randomised items like weapons, special ammo, one-time buffs and skill points to aid progress. I found this inclusion to be a little off-putting here, since one of Breach's draw cards for me was its skill-based leaderboards, and your performance can be significantly helped or hindered depending on what random drops you do or don't receive.

Although multiplayer-focused, Breach also attempts to tie directly into the Deus Ex universe. As you progress, new conspiracy stories arise and unlocking their details requires you to successfully collect a number of gems in particular missions. These are interesting to take in, but feel out of place within Breach. I would've rather uncovered these dark mysteries in the main game, rather than collecting gems and punching bright neon men in the face in an optional mode. Tonal confusion aside, Breach is still a pleasing way to hone your skills with Deus Ex's action mechanics.

Deus Ex: Mankind Divided refines and reinforces the defining foundations of the series. It creates challenging situations and gives players the tools and flexibility to deal with them in a multitude of ways, all within an absorbing cyberpunk world. Although not a significant departure from Human Revolution, Mankind Divided is still a uniquely fulfilling experience, one which feels rare in games today.

Please use a html5 video capable browser to watch videos.
This video has an invalid file format.
00:00:00
Sorry, but you can't access this content!
Please enter your date of birth to view this video

By clicking 'enter', you agree to GameSpot's
Terms of Use and Privacy Policy

Now Playing: Deus Ex: Mankind Divided Review

Back To Top

The Good

  • City hubs are dense and well-realised
  • Exploration is rewarding
  • Variety of mechanics provide a number of satisfying solutions to every situation
  • Branching plot and sidequest choices entice additional playthroughs

The Bad

  • Complex plot can be hard to latch onto
  • Augmentation overclocking system is disappointingly lenient

About the Author

Edmond Tran played Mankind Divided on PC. He spent around 30 hours completing the campaign and nearly all side missions as a stealthy, pacifist hacker, before starting New Game+ and solving every problem with a revolver.
522 Comments  RefreshSorted By 
GameSpot has a zero tolerance policy when it comes to toxic conduct in comments. Any abusive, racist, sexist, threatening, bullying, vulgar, and otherwise objectionable behavior will result in moderation and/or account termination. Please keep your discussion civil.

Avatar image for bigruss730
bigruss730

241

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 6

User Lists: 5

This should have have been on your 2016 goty list, it's not perfect but is a lot better than some of the shite on there.

3 • 
Avatar image for anabi4
anabi4

1

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 0

User Lists: 0

muito bom

Upvote • 
Avatar image for Yojimbo25
Yojimbo25

535

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 71

User Lists: 0

I'm throwing this out there and I really believe it as well.

Deus Ex Human Revolution was so much better.

3 • 
Avatar image for juliano001
juliano001

535

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 38

User Lists: 0

At least you guys could have been decent enough to say the game is so heavily bugged and crashes so much that it is unplayable. I spent 44 dollars and cant even past intro. Amazing.

Upvote • 
Avatar image for ninboxstation
ninboxstation

421

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 6

User Lists: 0

@juliano001:

get a console

2 • 
Avatar image for guardian2066
guardian2066

39

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 1

User Lists: 0

Edited By guardian2066

I just checked the shop and.....praxis kits and credit chips??? Thats what people are bitching about? Hahahaha holy shit.

I don't see why anyone would bother spending any money for these since the game gives you more than enough praxis kits and credit chips.

Even if someone has alot of money and decides to spend money in the shop, whats wrong with it? Its a single player game isn't it? They'l be ruining it for themselves. You know that there are cheatcodes and shit too right? So whats wrong if a company just wants to earn some extra money from people who want to spend it?

Micro transactions in a single player game is not a good trend tho, because potentially they can make it so that you can't progress through the game without spending money apart from buying the game. However this game doesn't have anything like that.

4 • 
Avatar image for kgb
kgb

50

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 2

User Lists: 5

@guardian2066: It is wonderfully done in Deus Ex. You can buy 'em, if you want, but you REALLY don't have to. A pleasant surprise and I can easily say, it earns my respect! :)

Upvote • 
Avatar image for facts23
facts23

117

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 0

User Lists: 5

don't try hyping this thig too hard. i p,ayed the first one on ps3 and thought it was an incoherent mess. of course i don't want to play and pay for more of the same. develop something new and worth the while and you don't need to implement a drm that clear,y shows that there is no correlation between piracy and the sales figues of a good game. if you are producing a sequel and it tanks - don't complain.

Upvote • 
Avatar image for cyboricarus
CyborIcarus

173

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 3

User Lists: 0

@facts23: incoherent mess? are you serious?

3 • 
Avatar image for zeke_pliskin
zeke_pliskin

28

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 5

User Lists: 0

Edited By zeke_pliskin

@facts23: "The first one" was Deus Ex, released in 2000 for PC. Later re-released with significant changes as Deus Ex: The Conspiracy for the PS2 in 2002. Then there was Invisible War in 2003, Xbox/Windows only, followed by Human Revolution in 2011 which you can now get for PC, Mac, Xbox360, PS3 and Wii U. So that's technically the third one.

Just because something doesn't always have a completely linear path and doesn't handhold you through the objectives doesn't mean it's an incoherent mess, not every game needs to be CoD, although the stories on those recently have been all over the place but that's another story. Personally I would consider Human Revolution best in series, having played them all. The "incoherent mess" was probably Invisible War, which I enjoyed but is easily the weakest in series.

7 • 
Avatar image for kgb
kgb

50

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 2

User Lists: 5

Edited By kgb

@zeke_pliskin: Gah, they're all awesome! Great experience, can be a (bit of a) challenge and beginners can play them too... They're, just, wonderful games (in spite of any, possible, shortcomings) and I love 'em all! =)

Upvote • 
Avatar image for Gelugon_baat
Gelugon_baat

24222

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 605

User Lists: 4

Edited By Gelugon_baat

People who defend the microtransactions or say that they are optional and shit should realize that the resources and time which went into developing and implementing the microtransaction system could have gone into something else that adds more value to the product instead.

Also, everyone should read this - and think twice about playing this game, or at least think twice about giving money to Square Enix, especially for the computer version.

Upvote • 
Avatar image for kgb
kgb

50

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 2

User Lists: 5

@Gelugon_baat: I've made this comment already: micro transactions in this game can have *no* impact on gameplay and if the developers want to implement them in THIS way (only), then why not..:)

Upvote • 
Avatar image for ninboxstation
ninboxstation

421

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 6

User Lists: 0

@Gelugon_baat:

you're way over-hyping the microtransactions in Deus Ex MD.., they're only small stuff you don't need and are there to probably help out inexperienced players with extra credits and tools.. (which you can find enough of in the game for free...)

2 • 
Avatar image for Gelugon_baat
Gelugon_baat

24222

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 605

User Lists: 4

@ninboxstation: Really? Your argument is that the microtransactions are there for inexperienced players?

There is the difficulty setting, you should be reminded. The easier settings should more than suffice as crutches for inexperienced players.

2 • 
Avatar image for guardian2066
guardian2066

39

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 1

User Lists: 0

@Gelugon_baat: I have the pc version and I just finished it, whats the problem with the DRM exactly? I'm asking out of curiosity more than anything else since I didn't face any problems while playing the game.

The game tho was meh.

Upvote • 
Avatar image for Gelugon_baat
Gelugon_baat

24222

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 605

User Lists: 4

@guardian2066: You did not have the bad luck of having the Denuvo cause problems for you.

Upvote • 
Avatar image for guardian2066
guardian2066

39

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 1

User Lists: 0

@Gelugon_baat: Yeah I mentioned that, so what are the drm related problems that you face normally?

Upvote • 
Avatar image for Gelugon_baat
Gelugon_baat

24222

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 605

User Lists: 4

@guardian2066: I wouldn't face them 'normally' - I don't buy game licenses with DRM attached.

With that said, you should have heard about the authentication steps in DRM software not triggering properly.

Upvote • 
Avatar image for guardian2066
guardian2066

39

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 1

User Lists: 0

@Gelugon_baat: So.....thats....it? Huh...wait so what are you complaining about exactly? You never buy games with DRM and the reason for that is that people * might * face problems with it sometimes?

Ah anyway, to each his own. You'r not missing much, the game was ok.

2 • 
Avatar image for Gelugon_baat
Gelugon_baat

24222

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 605

User Lists: 4

Edited By Gelugon_baat

@guardian2066: That the complaint about the possibility of something bad happening may seem petty to you, but DRM doesn't bring any noticeable benefits to the customer, other than being some kind of badge of legitimacy.

(Distributors like Good Old Games and Humble Store - when Humble Store does sell DRM-free licenses - don't care much for that kind of shit though.)

More importantly, the resources that went into implementing DRM could have gone into something else instead. Furthermore, the customer is paying for something that doesn't add value to their purchase, but has the potential to cause them problems.

Upvote • 
Avatar image for guardian2066
guardian2066

39

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 1

User Lists: 0

@Gelugon_baat: The customer is paying for the product, drm and all. I get it, you don't like DRM, so you don't buy products which have them, thats your choice. Similarly the publisher doesn't want to release their game without DRM because in business if there is even a possibility to avoid loss then you should take it, like in this case they felt that it was worth spending on denuvo. Time will tell if it was the right choice or not.

Correct me if I'm wrong but don't most platforms from where you can purchase the game provide refunds?

Doesn't almost every electronic product have some component, that you never use, but has the potential to cause problems?

2 • 
Avatar image for Gelugon_baat
Gelugon_baat

24222

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 605

User Lists: 4

@guardian2066: Once the customer has "used" the product in any way, e.g. playing it, refunds are only provided for technical issues, and only within a set time period from the purchase (not the moment when it is first used). Even then the distributor requests that the customer (who made the request for a refund) waits for a week for a response from the game-maker.

As for your second question, it sounds like a sa-shaying on your part; in this case, DRM software is not analogous to an electronic product. If there is any relevance to that question, it would be relevant to the companies who purchase the licenses to use the DRM software in their own products, and not to the end customer, i.e. the DRM software is not for the benefit of the end customer. Also, the end customer is paying for the license to play the game; the DRM software is not part of the gameplay (especially in this case), and, I will repeat what I have said earlier, does not add value to the purchase.

With that said, instead of saying that the customer is paying for the product, DRM and all, you could have argued that the game-maker could have absorbed the costs for the implementation of the DRM software instead of passing them to the customer, and that would have been an argument that I could swallow. Yet, as far as I know, I have not seen a breakdown of the costs that the customer would be paying for in the asking price of game licenses.

Upvote • 
Avatar image for consolehaven
ConsoleHaven

1656

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 9

User Lists: 5

The attention to detail in this game is absolutely amazing. Immersion was certainly a priority. This game is entirely worth playing and paying 'full price' for.

6 • 
Avatar image for ganondorf77
ganondorf77

410

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 9

User Lists: 0

Edited By ganondorf77

1 time microtransactions -10. No matter the fun.

Denuvo -10. No matter the fun.

Upvote • 
Avatar image for crissdev8
crissdev8

2

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 0

User Lists: 0

Guys I see that a lot of you are encountering issues in the game. I managed to fix mine with the solutions on GamesErrors, just search for the blog on google and there you will find a lot of workarounds to fix your issues.

2 • 
Avatar image for Calikidd86
Calikidd86

285

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 0

User Lists: 0

I'm enjoying it. Don't get the anger over microtransaction's in a single player game to be honest. Don't like em, just don't buy them, not like someone else buying them is going to ruin your experience.

3 • 
Avatar image for ganondorf77
ganondorf77

410

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 9

User Lists: 0

@Calikidd86: That's not the point, at all.

Upvote • 
Avatar image for Gelugon_baat
Gelugon_baat

24222

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 605

User Lists: 4

Edited By Gelugon_baat

According to Jeff Gerstmann, there were no micro-transactions whatsoever in the review copies. **** Square Enix and Eidos Montreal.

Also, I checked his review article, made on 19th August. There were no changes to reflect the presence of the microtransactions.

I am having the impression that there is some kind of legal obstacle to update reviews which are based on review copies.

One more thing: fucking DRM - also not mentioned in reviews based on review copies.

I am not going to play this game, and if you are reading this, you shouldn't either. This is shit in the consumer's face.

2 • 
Avatar image for consolehaven
ConsoleHaven

1656

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 9

User Lists: 5

@Gelugon_baat: No it's not. People whining over DRM especially are entitled cry babies who place very little value on the foundation their own standard of living depends on: CAPITALISM. The same goes for microtransactions. The game isn't very punishing and it's clear they're there to make an extra buck, but not at the expense of regular player progress. Get over yourself and see the bigger picture, contrary to what you think, the more people think like you the less likely big budget titles are going to exist in the future.

6 • 
Avatar image for Gelugon_baat
Gelugon_baat

24222

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 605

User Lists: 4

@consolehaven: If that's how big budget titles are going to turn out, then they are better not being made at all.

With that said, for someone who has said things like "seeing the bigger picture", you don't realize that development resources which went into implementing microtransactions could have gone into something else that is more valuable to the customer instead.

Upvote • 
Avatar image for cyboricarus
CyborIcarus

173

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 3

User Lists: 0

@Gelugon_baat: **** square not eidos, it's not their fault. the goddamned micro transactions are not needed because the game is perfectly balanced, square forced the devs to add them because they are fucking stupid. the DRM didn't affect the game in a negative way, it's not like hitman and you don't need an internet connection. stop being so negative.

5 • 
Avatar image for Gelugon_baat
Gelugon_baat

24222

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 605

User Lists: 4

@cyboricarus: You seem to be quite a fan of the game, one that glosses over its problems. You even made your account close to the release of the game, giving me the impression that you are an astroturfer as well.

You are the kind of person that I would not listen to, and whom I will tell others to consider your statements with a pinch of salt.

2 • 
Avatar image for cyboricarus
CyborIcarus

173

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 3

User Lists: 0

Edited By CyborIcarus

@Gelugon_baat: i'm a fan but not a fanboy and i don't gloss over the problems. this is my fourth gamespot account , i created this one because comments didn't work in my previous account for some reason.

nothing is wrong in my previous comment, my statements aren't false, the micro transactions are not needed at all and the game doesn't require an internet connection, you don't believe me? as other gamers, they will give you the same answer.

Upvote • 
Avatar image for Pukshd
Pukshd

119

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 3

User Lists: 0

Could a kind souls answer me cuz the review wasn't enough; is non lethal as xp rewarding and pretty much better than lethal like in Human Revolution?

Upvote • 
Avatar image for cyboricarus
CyborIcarus

173

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 3

User Lists: 0

@Pukshd: both are equally rewarding.

4 • 
Avatar image for LogitechG5
LogitechG5

28

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 4

User Lists: 0

Another overhyped title by paid reviewers....

- Has intrusive DRM garbage called DENUVO

- Microtransactions yuck!

- Dated graphics and not well optimized for PC

- Story loses any appeal after the first few missions and all characters are boring and not interesting

- RPG elements of the game are not that well implemented and some of the upgrades are not that useful…

3 • 
Avatar image for cyboricarus
CyborIcarus

173

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 3

User Lists: 0

@LogitechG5: stop posting this shit in every single site/

3 • 
Avatar image for thesadmagician
TheSadMagician

9

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 0

User Lists: 0

@cyboricarus: stop crying about it/

Upvote • 
Avatar image for cyboricarus
CyborIcarus

173

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 3

User Lists: 0

@thesadmagician: i'm not crying about anything

2 • 
Avatar image for Sound_Demon
Sound_Demon

802

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 3

User Lists: 0

Compare this with Metal Gear 5. This game is complete and has a more fulfilling world. The story is just as complex and good and no, it's not hard to latch on. It covers more realistic problems which correctly revolve around Augmentations ie, businesses, medical, terrorism, naturalism, and social structures. Everything has character. Lots of hidden objectives and items that make exploring a blast. The tone is serious but not overdone either. This game should have gotten the 10.

6 • 
Avatar image for ninboxstation
ninboxstation

421

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 6

User Lists: 0

Edited By ninboxstation

@Sound_Demon: love the world, side-quests, atmosphere and exploring in Deus Ex MD more than MGSV...

even if the stealth could be a bit "harder" in Deus Ex MD (when starting on hard;... pity very-hard is only unlocked after beating it and not available from the start), its still very satisfying playing 100% stealth on hard...

2 • 
Avatar image for cammy_time
cammy_time

55

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 0

User Lists: 0

Edited By cammy_time

@Sound_Demon:Putting aside the ill-conceived notion that The Phantom Pain is unfinished, Mankind Divided may touch on these issues, but it doesn't really explore them in much depth either.

Part of this problem lies with the choices you carve out for yourself along the way. Yes, the game touches on the residual issues surrounding (heavy implementation of) human augmentation, but for a game that places such heavy emphasis on player agency it never culminates into anything impactful, which can make some choices seem inconsequential as a result.

There's a bigger issue surrounding this in that, without spoiling too much, this is a game that was clearly designed to set up the next one, and that's where ultimately the problem may lie; the developers imposing limits of our agency within the game so we don't rock the boat too much in order to facilitate a sequel (anyone who didn't upgrade the Normandy and crew loyalty in Mass Effect 2 will know what I'm on about).

2 • 
Avatar image for zeke_pliskin
zeke_pliskin

28

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 5

User Lists: 0

@Sound_Demon: MGS5 is realistic/serious in tone? What about the recruitment part where you can knock someone out and have them airlifted out with a balloon?

2 • 
Avatar image for mussumsoftware
mussumsoftware

33

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 1

User Lists: 0

Edited By mussumsoftware

The problem with microtransactions, specially in a single player game, is that you cannot know for sure if the balance of the game was intentionally disrupted in order to favor it. In some mobile games, it is rampant, you can see clearly that the scarcity of certain itens, potions for example, is not result of bad design, but an intentional manuever to force you into buying stuff.

Is this the case here? No one can say for sure.

The thing is: it brings mistrust. At least for me. Even if I come to play this game, this mistrustful feeling will feel like a splinter throughout my entire experience in the game.

Upvote • 
Avatar image for cyboricarus
CyborIcarus

173

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 3

User Lists: 0

@mussumsoftware: the game is perfectly balanced, i finished the game twice without using the store. the micro transactions are there but they are not needed.

2 • 
Avatar image for area69guy
Area69guy

6

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 0

User Lists: 0

Edited By Area69guy

This is an awesome game, but why those it feel like it's just a DLC , I wish they would make a remaster of Deus Ex revolution

Upvote • 
Avatar image for TigusVidiks
TigusVidiks

213

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 33

User Lists: 0

Edited By TigusVidiks

After doing the campaign and then some, 31 hours played, I can't say it's a bad game. In fact it would be unfair to say it. But it does leave me with a bad taste in my mouth.

Steam reviews have been suffering because of it and lots of people have already pointed out that pre-order DLC being single-use and tied to a save, is something I never saw coming and never even occurred to me they could pull off something like this, specially after all the "Missing Link" controversy. Also because, ya know.... In-game store for micro-transactions... in a single-player game. To me personally, that is where I draw a line. I realize some people will say "you don't have to use it", but I guess if you think that and cannot understand what the success of such a business model would mean for AAA gaming, then I guess you haven't been playing games for very long. Not to mention that difficulty, level design and game design itself are different if they have to accommodate the possibility of players having a lot more augs and skill from the very first level. The sense of progression and empowerment vanishes from the environment. The story tells you it's advancing, but the environment never does. You'll find yourself running circles around your objectives just for fun, to see all the possibilities, with no difficulty at all, and what's worse, without even needing the augmentations. I mean, having the main door with turrets, 2 guards, lasers and cameras, and 5 feet away in plain sight a giant hole in the wall, with a wood box in front of it is going too far in the dumb down. Augmentations are fun to use but, outside of smart vision, mostly irrelevant.

It's also perfectly fair to say that some people will be ok with this. There was a conscient choice I think, to give players a larger playground. Maps are huge, beautiful, well connected and cleaverly designed. And players are given a character that is more agile and organic, being almost able to parkour in the extensive maps. In theory this is all great, but I also think that it's part of the problem, and the reason I end up with a bad taste. It's sad that such a strong map design ends up so poorly used when it comes to create good gameplay challenges.

Probably if you play it as a regular action-adventure shooter you will have a lot more fun, I don't know. But that's not what I was looking for in Deus Ex.

And that In-game store.... **** that.

P.S.- When I say success of a business model, in this case, success would not be selling a ton of micro-transactions. Success would be to have players be OK with the store's presence in a single-player game. If players get accustomed to that, imagine the commercial possibilities. I can already see them drooling over it.

4 • 
Avatar image for cherub1000
Cherub1000

938

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 0

User Lists: 5

@TigusVidiks: just checked it out for 20 mins lastnight and yeah, I was surprised at the amount of Micro-transactions, I won't be using them myself though. I'm really looking forward to getting stuck into this next weekend, I hope I won't feel to similar to yourself, time will tell I guess.

2 • 

Deus Ex: Mankind Divided

First Released Aug 23, 2016
released
  • Linux
  • Macintosh
  • PC
  • PlayStation 4
  • Xbox One

Deus Ex: Mankind Divided is an action role-playing game that takes place in 2029, two years after the events of Human Revolution and the infamous ‘Aug Incident’ in Panchaea that resulted in the death of millions at the hands of those who had installed augmentations.

8
Great

Average Rating

278 Rating(s)

7.5
Content is generally suitable for ages 17 and up. May contain intense violence, blood and gore, sexual content and/or strong language.
Mature
Blood, Drug Reference, Intense Violence, Partial Nudity, Sexual Themes, Strong Language, Use of Alcohol