Bubble Ducky Review

Children respond to fanciful imagery and high levels of interactivity, none of which can be found here.

When children take toys into the tub, whether rubber duckies or ninja turtles, they seem to create entire aquatic worlds. Boats and hollow figurines are repeatedly submerged, only to resurface with a reassuring consistency and inviolability. The occasional skirmish erupts--perhaps between one of the aforementioned rubber duckies and a spring-action Hulk Hogan figurine--but these disputes are quickly resolved, as the tub is a large enough environment to support all miniaturized life. Digital Chocolate's Bubble Ducky hardly exemplifies this youthful spirit of creativity. This game takes the Elimimatch formula, which is older than mobile gaming itself, and applies a cute bathroom motif. Victories and failures yield the same result in Bubble Ducky (a rubber duck appearing in one of several outfits), and the core game couldn't be less rewarding to play.

You'll probably drop Bubble Ducky in favor of games with more replay value.
You'll probably drop Bubble Ducky in favor of games with more replay value.

In Bubble Ducky, you're presented with a screen filled with geometrically identical bubbles. These appear in several colors, which automatically group when adjacent to identically hued spheres. Pressing on one of these lipidic masses will cause it to pop, netting you a number of chips (points) corresponding to the size of the pack of bubbles, prior to its detonation. The void thereby created will be filled by the bubbles adjacent to the ones you just dissolved, so the main challenge in the game is to determine what groupings will result from each pop. If you've played any sort of Elimimatch game, you'll find this gameplay to be identical.

The inherent problem with this game is that victory feels too random. It's difficult to determine the wide-reaching ramifications of your initial moves, particularly if you're a member of the younger, casual demographic Bubble Ducky seems to target. At the end of a game, you'll be left with a certain number of bubbles, and your total won't necessarily lessen as you gain experience. Regardless of the outcome of a game, you'll be sent back to the splash screen, with your score appearing on a local high-score list. Increasingly challenging levels and some sort of connectivity would have been welcome.

Bubble Ducky looks just fine on the LG MM-535. The splash screen is a tiled bathroom with a terrycloth towel. Gameplay takes place on this same tiled surface, on which ducks frequently appear in outlandish outfits, including Terminator garb. The game's audio, however, sounds as though it were composed in Mario Paint, and it's unpleasantly dissonant and arrhythmic.

Bubble Ducky, while cute, doesn't bring anything new to the well-worn Elimimatch genre, which has proliferated since the inception of mobile data download services. Children respond to fanciful imagery and high levels of interactivity, none of which can be found here. There are many similar, superior puzzle games available on mobile, such as AstroPop and QBz for Prizes.

The Good
Cute duckies!
Attractive presentation
The Bad
The music is arrhythmic and generally displeasing
Tired Elimimatch gameplay
Only one level per difficulty setting
Not terribly strategic by design
5.3
Mediocre
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Bubble Ducky More Info

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  • First Released Sep 2, 2004
    released
    • Mobile
    Children respond to fanciful imagery and high levels of interactivity, none of which can be found here.
    8.2
    Average Rating14 Rating(s)
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    Developed by:
    Digital Chocolate
    Published by:
    Digital Chocolate
    Genre(s):
    Puzzle
    Content is generally suitable for all ages. May contain minimal cartoon, fantasy or mild violence and/or infrequent use of mild language.
    Everyone