waterguyroks' forum posts

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waterguyroks

@lithus: lol, keep telling yourself that. I used to be a console gamer, transitioned to PC at the beginning of this generation. I'm not hating on consoles because I had some great times with them, but at this point I think it'd be hard for me to go back. Better graphics, mods, more games, lower prices... I honestly don't see any noticeable downsides to PC. Sure, it's a bit more expensive, but I haven't upgraded my PC in any way in the last two years and it still works fine, I can play on High on most games today. Besides, the amount of money I save on sales probably offsets the increased cost of PC gaming. Not to mention, a good PC has utility beyond gaming.

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waterguyroks

And of course this game gets bashed to all hell by the comment section. I haven't played the game so honestly I can't say if it's any good or not. But I've seen the same comments posted over and over again every time a game like this gets reviewed. Is it really so difficult to step back and relinquish expectations for a game, and just take it on its own terms?

The only game I've played of this sort so far is Gone Home. Do I think it's a masterpiece? No, not even close. But I enjoyed it. I came into it with the knowledge that it wasn't going to be an action-packed fps, and thought it was pretty good for what it was. Uncovering all the little clues about what had gone on in the house, learning about the members of the family gradually, their personalities, their secrets, made me feel invested in the story and atmosphere. Then I played it again and beat it in 15 minutes. But the game isn't about mechanically rushing through and unlocking all the doors to get to the end. Games like these ask that you open up a bit to them, and if you do you could walk away with something worthwhile.

And really, are games like these so different from games like The Walking Dead and Heavy Rain, whose choices and game "mechanics" are mostly window-dressing? Yet games like those don't get nearly as much flak, it seems. (Note that I haven't played Heavy Rain but also enjoyed the Walking Dead)

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waterguyroks

@themidgethotel:

lol just face it. u mad

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waterguyroks

<< LINK REMOVED >> "I live in my personal societal bubble where people are just as conservative, mysogynistic, and white as I am. I have little contact with the outside world so when I see an opinion that differs from mine I automatically assume they're wrong and fall back on my archaic model of how the world should be run, based on 1950s American moral values." - freedomzealot.


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waterguyroks

<< LINK REMOVED >> Even if that were true, it doesn't invalidate my point. Is something less racist/mysogynistic/whatever if it has less of a demographic to appeal to? Are movies about the superiority of the aryan race less despicable if their target audience is the neo-nazis?

I know it's an extreme example, but arguing that something has a right to be wrong because it's trying to appeal to less people doesn't make sense.

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waterguyroks

<< LINK REMOVED >> Maybe you couldn't care, but I'm sure at least some of the female gamers care. This isn't about bringing up "political ******** bs," this is about females being underrepresented in a market in which they compose at least 40% (and many estimates point to higher numbers) of the population.

How would you feel if as a male, the vast majority of games make it literally impossible to play as someone of your own sex, or they clearly reduce characters of your sex to one-dimensional stereotypes and eye-candy?

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waterguyroks

<< LINK REMOVED >><< LINK REMOVED >> Wow, you truly lack basic reading comprehension skills if you don't understand the point FallenOneX was trying to make in his comment.

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waterguyroks

<< LINK REMOVED >><< LINK REMOVED >><< LINK REMOVED >> Is it not? What are these sorts of stereotypes reinforcing? Are they not just perpetuating a normative idea of what being "masculine" or "feminine" is? Is it not pigeonholing us into gender roles?

Beyond that, my comment was not about how good or bad stereotypes arein general society (although I do believe that they are bad). It was about how in a supposedly creative medium such as video games, stereotypes are just an easy way out for developers. And as long as gamers accept them, it'll keep the industry stagnant.

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waterguyroks

Reading the comments section is pretty disappointing. I don't know if this represents the general gaming population or just Gamespot's audience, but either way it lowers my expectations of maturity in gamers even more.


I think most people reading the article aren't getting it. This might be just some good publicity from Bioware, but it doesn't change the fact that he's right. The video game industry is, as of right now, a joke. Everyone complains about how the industry pumps out the same games over and over again but as soon as someone wants to change something everyone flips their shit over it.

Using stereotypes is lazy. It's not just a matter of inclusiveness in the gaming community (which is a big problem). It's a matter of getting developers out of the creative rut that they're in. If video games ever want to aspire to be something more than entertainment for the lowest common denominator, then they've got to move away from lazy developing.

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waterguyroks

<< LINK REMOVED >> Wrong. Stereotypes do not celebrate anything. Stereotypes are the anti-thought; they let developers put in prop-up characters that the audience already knows as opposed to forcing them to create actual interesting characters from scratch. In short, it's just lazy developing, and the game suffers from it.

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