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lordgodalming

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#1 lordgodalming
Member since 2005 • 273 Posts

I bought Catcher in the Rye today, I quite like what I've read so far.

applesxc47

Interesting thing about that book. Everyone I'  talked to who read it before the age of 18 said it changed their lives. Everyone who read it after that age just kind of shrugged about it. For myself, I thought it was pretty good (read it when I was about 22). Hope you enjoy it. 

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lordgodalming

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#2 lordgodalming
Member since 2005 • 273 Posts

I am, and have always been, an avid reader. Before I became a Christian I used to read a lot of fantasy novels (Dragonlance, Forgotten Realms, etc.) Since I became a Christian, other than reading my bible every day, I read theology books. I just finished reading a book by John Piper called What Jesus Demands From The World and started reading For Calvinism by Michael Horton on top of working my way through the monstrously large The City of God by Augustine of Hippo. I still like to read comic books as well, but I do not know if most people would count that as reading. 

Euaggelistes

So did you quit reading fantasy because you became a Christian, or did those things just happen at similar times? You don't have to answer, I'm just curious.

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lordgodalming

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#3 lordgodalming
Member since 2005 • 273 Posts

I love reading, I've got a stack of books in my coffee table just waiting to be read and a book cupboard filled with books as well as DVDs and older books in my parent's attic. I've been reading since I was two and a half - my mum taught me to read at an early age. Many tend to think that gamers are too dim witted and impatient to read, which when you consider many of the games that are released would make some sense due to the lack of stories, the focus on action over story, the demand to be more about killing than thinking. But not every gamer is as impatient as many like to think they are.Smokescreened84

I think you've hit it on the head with the impatience thing. The established publishing world is clinging to old stereotypes of consumers, and are therefore losing out on big chunks of their prospective audience. Ther are books based on games - an acquaintance of mine named Tobias Buckell became a bestseller with a book based in the Halo universe - but they can't quite seem to understand that gamers are 1) not just children, 2) literate, and 3) can be just as hungry for a good book as any English professor.

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#4 lordgodalming
Member since 2005 • 273 Posts

I am a lifelong gamer, reader, and writer. When I was a kid I spent my summer evenings either stretched out on the couch with a sci-fi novel, or on my dads PC playing Lucasarts adventure games. So heres my question: are other gamers readers?

Ive been writing books for a good ten years now, a few of them good enough to publish, and my newest book is actually about a gamer. The feedback Ive gotten from agents and publishers is, Great story, but theres no market for it because gamers dont read.

To which I say, REALLY? I am a gamer and a reader. My friends are gamers and readers. What am I missing? Thanks for taking the time to reply.

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#5 lordgodalming
Member since 2005 • 273 Posts

I think a lot of XIII's bad rap is simply the internet's power to make people say "Me too!" Even sites that initially gave positive reviews for XIII are now talking about what garbage it was—although that may also be because it gets their forums buzzing. For awhile it became the popular thing to say "OMG LINEAR THE JRPG IS DEAD MASS EFFECT RULES LOL."

Yeah, yeah. Personally, I've played FFI, VI, VII, VIII, IX, X, X-2, XII, XIII, and XIII-2, and I have LOVED them all, even X-2. You just never know exactly what you're going to get when you pop in a new Final Fantasy (at least if you go on media blackout like I do before a launch), except that it's going to be different than the previous ones and it's going to be very well made, and in my opinion that element of surprise is all part of the fun.

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#6 lordgodalming
Member since 2005 • 273 Posts
[QUOTE="lordgodalming"][QUOTE="iloveflash"]

If you can't afford every game in the world, you probably should be using your money on more important things.iloveflash

 

I'm confused. So if you can't afford all games, you shouldn't buy any? Isn't that a bit like saying, "If you can't eat lobster for every meal, you should quit eating"? Maybe I'm missing your point. 

Well, it's important to point out here that eating and playing games are two very different things. Gaming is not a necessity to staying alive, while eating is. Within that context, yeah, that is exactly what I mean: don't buy games you can't afford. With $60, for example, I can by myself a nice lobster dinner with olive rice and garlic buns. Or better yet, I can buy my family some clothes. Or better yet, I can save up for my son's education. Pay life insurance. A phone bill. Etcetera.

Again, this is assuming that you worked really hard to earn that money in the first place. If money comes to you easily, by all means, use it for what it's for. If not, be aware of the bare necessities and act responsibly. I think the world wouldn't be in such deep economic feces right now if people adhered to that philosophy.

I think I'm starting to get you. "Don't buy games you can't afford" is a far different message than "Don't buy any games if you can't buy them all," which is what I understood the first time. Lobster notwithstanding, this type of logic would also lead to "Don't buy a PS3 unless you can ALSO afford a 360, a Wii, a PSP, a DS, a gaming PC, etc." Which is of course ludicrous.

But your real message seems to be moderation. I'm a big fan of moderation. Most things in life taste best that way in my opinion. And that leads back to my original post, which argues that our (the gaming community's) immoderation in the way we consume information from the internet leads to an overly critical slant in most professional game reviews. So I will show some moderation of my own and sign off Gamespot to read a book and perhaps go to bed at a reasonable hour.

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#7 lordgodalming
Member since 2005 • 273 Posts

If you can't afford every game in the world, you probably should be using your money on more important things.iloveflash

 

I'm confused. So if you can't afford all games, you shouldn't buy any? Isn't that a bit like saying, "If you can't eat lobster for every meal, you should quit eating"? Maybe I'm missing your point. 

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#8 lordgodalming
Member since 2005 • 273 Posts

I'm particularly annoyed at those top 20 lists because I click them myself.

Ha ha, me too. Every once in a while you get a funny one. Gamesradar does a decent job making funny lists. But as you say, there would be no need for them without our unending demand for game-related infotainment. 

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#9 lordgodalming
Member since 2005 • 273 Posts

Some games used to suck. And I don't mean they had some screen-tearing or "slightly floaty" jump mechanics. I mean they were boring, catastrophically glitched, or just plain unplayable for any number of reasons.

This problem scarcely exists anymore. Like the film industry in the late 70's, gaming has been changed by the phenomenon of the big-budget blockbuster. Retail games simply can't afford to suck at the same level as older games used to suck. Complaints about games like Final Fantasy XIII or more recently Castlevania are so nitpicky and ridiculous that I'm surprised any thinking person could take them seriously. Ratchet & Clank Future: Tools of Destruction gets a 7.5 on Gamespot for having too much variety?...WHAT?

Why do the gaming media do this? Because they have to, and there are a couple reasons why. One, because games are technology-based, gamers immediately become acclimatized to--and therefore expect--constant improvements in technology, production values, etc. That makes sense. Plenty of games that were considered outstanding 10 years ago now seem run-of-the mill or downright lousy compared to current "average" games. That's just the nature of the beast, whether the beast be the gaming industry, technology, or humanity itself.

The other reason is far more problematic. Like television news networks that must fill a 24-hour news cycle, the gaming media are under tremendous pressure to keep their readers coming back hour after hour, day after day. We gamers, as an audience, are truly insatiable, and you could argue that the constant flood of information and opinions coming from gaming sites only makes us hungrier. For example, Tetsuya Nomura tweets that FFVXIII has a new hair-rendering system that allows for 6% more waviness? Every gaming news outlet in the world rushes to repost this "story" and suddenly N4G has 20 new Top-Tens about the best/worst haircuts in video games.

And you know what? WE CLICK THE LINKSBecause we are insatiable. Also like television news, positive information is a hard sell. All of these new games that five years ago would have been game-of-the-year contenders are now "too linear," only have 2x AA instead of 4x, or suffer from occasional online lag (usually prior to launch, so the complaint is even more meaninless). The gaming media MUST complain about these things because we gamers would quit reading reviews if every single one read, "Well, doggone it, THIS game is great too. What a golden age of bounty we live in when every game works and is pretty fun right out of the box. See you tomorrow!"

Gaming has been my favorite hobby for over 20 years now, and I continue to be relentlessly positive about it. I can't afford to buy every new game that comes out, but the ones I do buy I consistently enjoy. Which is more than I could have said even ten years ago. It's just too bad that being positive doesn't generate more hits.