Video game Quality Certification/"going gold" Debate

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Shmiity

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#1 Shmiity
Member since 2006 • 6339 Posts

Okay guys- I rarely make threads on this forum unless I really think something needs discussing. I pose this to everyone:

We all know that since around 2006 many video games come out broken, unfinished, and in poor quality and are patched later (and the problem has progressively become worse). We all know this has become very abusive towards consumers and day-one patches/huge updates are now commonplace. Something I have a very hard time researching and finding information on, is:

Every game technically has to pass certification and "go gold" to be sold. Is this cert done by a third party? If so many games come out in such poor states, are these requirements too low? Are there no standards? Is the answer purely "If we had tougher standards, companies would make less money"? There is no way that the rating (ESRB) is the only requirement for a product to be sold. Or is it?

Take my question seriously and try to research this/put links here/discuss it. It's really hard info to find. And i'm surprised I can't find many threads on certification.

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sakaiXx

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#2 sakaiXx
Member since 2013 • 7018 Posts

Usually gone gold means the game is commercially playable from start to finish without update.

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mrbojangles25

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#3 mrbojangles25
Member since 2005 • 45619 Posts

You ask a really good question.

As for the answer...I don't know.

I know that they have to get rated for audience, but outside of that I don't think there is any sort of standards. If this is the case, it's pretty disappointing.

I mean, I get it; games are non-essential luxury products. It's not like it's a food product (that can make you sick), or a vehicle (that can crash and kill you if defective) or anything like that.

But at the same time, consumers need protection from predatory companies. Additionally, the whole digital aspect of it complicates things because you can't just walk in and return a game like you can a diamond ring. Even if it is a physical copy, if you opened it the store will be like "Oh you played it, no returns". You would really have to prove you either didn't play the game, or the disc is defective or something.

I think the best answer would be to have an industry board staffed by a combination of industry professionals and also consumer representatives or something along those lines. If a company wants their certification, they have to submit their product for testing and after a certain amount of hours it can be released to the public, certified that it has passed inspection.

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Shmiity

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#4 Shmiity
Member since 2006 • 6339 Posts

@mrbojangles25: Thats what Im saying, man. I cant find any info on this, either. It's a luxury entertainment product... but video games dominate all entertainment in $$. And so many companies abuse us

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Shmiity

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#5 Shmiity
Member since 2006 • 6339 Posts

@sakaixx: I just dont believe that. We have played so many games that constantly break and dont function. The Silent Hill HD collection comes to mind. SH3 on PS3 was unplayable/broke down after the Sewers.

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Gatygun

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#6 Gatygun
Member since 2010 • 1846 Posts

I think going gold just means slang for they got a copy to push out. I don't think going gold means any quality or anything. As games will always be developed further.

Even nintendo in the 90's had patches for games through new cartridges. So yea bugs will always stay.

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Pedro

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#7  Edited By Pedro
Member since 2002 • 37060 Posts

I have gone through the process of certification for consoles. Its typically a list of requirements for the "title". It can be as basic as "Game should always be responsive" or "Game should support feature X." Most of the certification does not deal directly with the quality of the game but the overall functionality.

EDIT: Certification is sealed under NDA.

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sakaiXx

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#8 sakaiXx
Member since 2013 • 7018 Posts

@Shmiity: sometimes dev ship unfinished game due to various reasons. Still, usually gone gold just means its just commercially at a playable state to ending with bugs and glitches that comes with it. This why early leak games is playable even without day 1 patches.

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getyeryayasout

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#9 getyeryayasout
Member since 2005 • 12866 Posts

Nearly every abuse I remember being discussed going into the PS3 and 360's broadband enabled reign have come to pass.

I largely detest the gaming industry these days. It's always been a little scummy, but publishers have become so manipulative and predatory, it's difficult to support many of them.

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SUD123456

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#10 SUD123456
Member since 2007 • 5459 Posts

Going gold has nothing to do with quality and never did. Gold simply means the master copy and was literally gold colored in the CD era. Whether it was a buggy mess or not was and is irrelevant to the phrase. It's the master, it will be copied and shipped/sold. Period.

The fact that you can do day 1 patches etc. is simply a reflection of the fact that you can update remotely through the internet and that this is a viable and potentially cheaper way to get your product to market sooner.