New PC, Old Hard Drives

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mrbojangles25

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#1  Edited By mrbojangles25
Member since 2005 • 45040 Posts

Hello! I had some questions and was hoping you folks might be able to help me.

Let's say I built myself a fresh, new computer with a sweet M.2 500 GB Samsung SSD (for my OS and certain apps) and a 2 TB Intel M.2 SSD (for games).

But, on my old computer, I had a pretty decent traditional 1 TB SSD with some data I'd like to keep. It's also where I kept a lot of my games installed.

  • If I hooked the old SSD into my new computer, would it read right away just fine, no problems?
  • I have Steam, Origin, GoG, and so forth loaded on my old SSD; would those applications work? My concern is that for whatever reason there might be files on my OS drive that are needed on my gaming drive and if I move my old gaming drive to my new PC (with new OS drive) there might be issues

Any other advice you have for someone that is migrating hard drives over to a new PC would be greatly appreciated.

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mrbojangles25

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#2 mrbojangles25
Member since 2005 • 45040 Posts

Oh and one more question: when I finish copying the files from my old SSD to the new one, Windows has a way for me to completely reformat the old SSD so it's available all fresh and empty, right?

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BassMan

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#3  Edited By BassMan
Member since 2002 • 11031 Posts

First, I just want to bring to your attention that M.2 just relates to the form factor of the drive and where it connects to. You can still get M.2 drives that operate at SATA speeds. If you want a really fast drive for the OS, make sure it is M.2 NVMe.

You can connect your old SSD to your new PC and it will work fine. You can manage the games library folders within Steam, Origin, etc.. So, you can direct them to look wherever you have the games already installed. Keep in mind that games often install save or settings files to your Windows Documents folder. You may want to back that up as well.

You will be able to re-format the drive no problem once it is in your new system.

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mrbojangles25

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#4 mrbojangles25
Member since 2005 • 45040 Posts

@BassMan: thank you! And yep I will be getting the NVMe drives.

Just getting ready for my new build. It's going to be the first build where I set my budget a bit higher than usual, so I just want to make sure I get the best bang for my buck, high performance, but not getting cheated by paying double for a 5% increase in performance haha.

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Random_Matt

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#5 Random_Matt
Member since 2013 • 4493 Posts

I'm getting a new build, anyone want to buy my X299, holy shit the new ones got completely decimated.

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04dcarraher

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#6 04dcarraher
Member since 2004 • 23269 Posts

Like the others have said That older SSD will hook up just fine.

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Horgen

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#7 Horgen  Moderator
Member since 2006 • 121741 Posts

Lots of SSD comes with software to clone from one drive to another so you get the new one as C drive. OS might need reactivation after changing the mobo though.

Just beware that the jump from HDD to SSD is bigger in terms of experienced performance than going from SATA SSD to NMVE SSD. At least for most users it is.