For monitors do you want the response time to be high or lower(2m/s or 8m/s)

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threeb07

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#1 threeb07
Member since 2007 • 59 Posts
For monitors do you want the response time to be higher or lower?
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Rob_101

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#2 Rob_101
Member since 2004 • 3291 Posts
The lower the better. Mine is 2ms which is the fastest I've seen and it also has a 3000:1 contrast ratio 8)
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Sentinel672002

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#3 Sentinel672002
Member since 2004 • 1585 Posts
I'm having all manner of problems finding LCDs with response times under 5ms locally. Irritating that...
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jmaster299

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#4 jmaster299
Member since 2004 • 326 Posts

For monitors do you want the response time to be higher or lower?threeb07

High response times are responsible for what people call "Ghosting" which means you see a double image or image drag when ever something moves. I read this big technical article on it and I don't remember everything about it but the typical response time you will find on LCDs is 5ms. You want to make sure your LCD is rated to 5ms or lower. The other guy on here replied about is 2ms monitor and that'sgreat response time but you will pay more for the better quality. Also, 5ms monitors are typicaly limited to a 700:1 - 1000:1 contrast ratio, it has some thing to do with what the monitors are actually built with and that are all in the same range. That number you want to be as high as possible because the higher the contrast ratio the wider range of colors your monitor can display making for a better picture. You will find monitors that have better MS response times will also have the higher contrast ratios. You typicaly want to go with 1000:1 or higher for the best experience. One thing to keep in mind, make sure your graphics card can handle what is known as the Native resolution for the monitor. Each monitor will list what resolution it's intended to be displayed at, for example 2560x1600, if you graphics card can not display at the "Native" resolution then the picture will not look right and look very low quality.

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Rob_101

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#5 Rob_101
Member since 2004 • 3291 Posts

I'm having all manner of problems finding LCDs with response times under 5ms locally. Irritating that...Sentinel672002

lol, do you have a Best Buy or Future Shop near you & do you live in USA or Canada?

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jmaster299

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#6 jmaster299
Member since 2004 • 326 Posts

I'm having all manner of problems finding LCDs with response times under 5ms locally. Irritating that...Sentinel672002

5ms the standard right now so finding a monitor with a better response time can be difficult because they are considered to be Higher End monitors. Do a search on places like newegg.com JUST for "2ms" this will get you the results you want with out listings for hundreds of monitors that don't fit what you are looking for.

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Sentinel672002

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#7 Sentinel672002
Member since 2004 • 1585 Posts

[QUOTE="Sentinel672002"]I'm having all manner of problems finding LCDs with response times under 5ms locally. Irritating that...Rob_101

lol, do you have a Best Buy or Future Shop near you & do you live in USA or Canada?

I'm a Yank. I've tried Best Buy, CompUSA and a few local outlets. The best I could find was 5ms. Of course, my current location isn't exactly near a large population center. More like the back of beyond... :(

Edit - Right now I'm stuck using a 17" CRT. It looks alright, but my 8800GTS is going to waste...aside from killer FPS... :P

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Rob_101

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#8 Rob_101
Member since 2004 • 3291 Posts

Hey I didn't pay that much, I think I got a pretty good deal:

http://www.futureshop.ca/catalog/proddetail.asp?sku_id=0665000FS10084227&catid=22335&logon=&langid=EN&test%5Fcookie=1

My monitor is exactly the same. Price I paid, specs, size, all the same. Except I got an LG not a Samsung. They even come with DVI cables. You just gotta look around and you'll find a good (2ms) cheap monitor.

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Makari

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#9 Makari
Member since 2003 • 15250 Posts
One thing to keep in mind is that there isn't any regulations regarding how the ms is calculated, so manufacturers pretty much say whatever they feel like. Generally a modern TN panel will be 5ms, with some sort of software 'overdrive' function it'll be 2ms. VA and IPS panels are anywhere from 6ms-12ms, depending on overdrive or not. But yeah, you can't immediately discount monitors from having low or high response times - the Dell 2007WFP is listed as 16ms, but was able to match or beat panels listed as 5ms or 3ms. References on those response time image links: http://www.behardware.com/articles/619-16/updated-survey-13-lcd-20-5-6-8-16-ms.html http://www.behardware.com/articles/662-3/22-inch-lcd-monitors-the-second-coming.html http://www.behardware.com/articles/680-4/lcd-24-iiyama-b2403ws-samsung-245t.html
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#10 Nitrous2O
Member since 2004 • 1813 Posts

One thing to keep in mind is that there isn't any regulations regarding how the ms is calculated, so manufacturers pretty much say whatever they feel like. Generally a modern TN panel will be 5ms, with some sort of software 'overdrive' function it'll be 2ms. VA and IPS panels are anywhere from 6ms-12ms, depending on overdrive or not. But yeah, you can't immediately discount monitors from having low or high response times - the Dell 2007WFP is listed as 16ms, but was able to match or beat panels listed as 5ms or 3ms. Makari

Yes, people definitely need to keep this is mind. It's confusing these days because of the differences is how the response rates are determined, you can't just compare apples to apples.

My monitor is rated at 12ms, but it's fantastic for gaming. It's been around a while (older response rate calculation), for example

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subrosian

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#11 subrosian
Member since 2005 • 14232 Posts
The misinformation here is EPIC.

There are three *types* of LCD panels (no, they're not all the same) - TN, VA, and IPS. High-end LCDs use IPS panels, generally speaking HDTVs have been forced to, and most large monitors, because the viewing angles on TN panels are not good enough for such a large monitor. Anyway, IPS panels will have a response time of at most 8ms, and sometimes as high as 16ms.

The cheapest type of panel (and worst image quality) is a TN panel. These panels use overdrive technology and can have response time as low as 2ms. These panels are favored by gamers because of the lack of ghosting, however, you don't get that *for free* - you trade color fidelity, viewing angle, and overall image quality in exchange for a faster monitor.

So, the real answer would be "it depends". A low response time (5ms, 2ms, etc) is indicative of a TN-type panel, which is a lower-end LCD. A high-end LCD that provides a better picture quality might have a higher response time. However, and there's the catch - a higher response time for the same type of panel is not better. So, if you're comparing TN panels, 2ms > 16ms. A high-response time does not necessarily indicate a VA or IPS panel.


It's all, basically, a confusing mess created by the failure of monitor manufacturers to disclose exactly what type of panel is being used in each monitor, or to measure things like response time, contrast, and color in any standardized way.