Why does almost everything in American society have a stigma attached to it?

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#1 Edited by qx0d (333 posts) -

Stigma basically means shame or embarrassment. It is disapproval that society has about something.

I've realized that almost everything in America has a stigma attached to it. Thinking about going to community college? That has a stigma. Work a minimum wage job? Stigma. Not married at 30? Stigma. Even being rich has a stigma, because many people seem to just assume rich people are snobs.

Has anyone else noticed this? Almost everything has a stigma. You can't even shop at Wal-Mart without some people saying its a poor person's store. I've even read online, some people say an associate degree isn't a "real" college degree, and you should get a bachelor's degree.

Pretty much anything you can think of has a stigma. You can't even be smart, because if you are, people will consider you a "nerd."

Have you ever realized this?

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#2 Posted by Sevenizz (3413 posts) -

Ignore the fake news. It’s the Left’s way of making you feel inferior just for existing and forcing you to adopt a globalist agenda.

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#3 Posted by jun_aka_pekto (25225 posts) -

I don't have much of a stigma for anything. If someone tries to convince me otherwise? I give that person the middle finger. I can think for myself. Thank you very much.

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#4 Posted by BalaminienBGS (66 posts) -

@qx0d:

Yup, but it get's better when you see it. You leverage what to expect against being surprised. Humans are constantly judging (environment aka stimuli), working out what needs a nuanced look based on the list of priorities they judged themselves to be the list vs general judgments passed around a society that can make things easier to judge and so require less energy to deduce. I know what you're thinking though, such general assumptions held or tied to people can make for more conflict within a society surely and thus doesn't make things easier relative to the relationship of judge and judged, but that's the struggle. I'm sure an anthropologist would have a much interesting and insightful response to this, but look outside of America and you can see other counties with stigma's, but speak to an individual of any country and ask what they think of things and throw in some key word (figures, chain stores) and you'll be introduced an opinion and/or judgement of these that may be a trend amongst the others around them.

The basic transportation of a stigma is gossip and that's a social currency. It's everywhere.

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#5 Posted by Horgen (119964 posts) -

@Sevenizz said:

Ignore the fake news. It’s the Left’s way of making you feel inferior just for existing and forcing you to adopt a globalist agenda.

Isn't being married before 30 more in line with conservative thinking?

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#6 Posted by mrbojangles25 (43558 posts) -

@qx0d said:

Stigma basically means shame or embarrassment.

I've realized that almost everything in America has a stigma attached to it. Thinking about going to community college? That has a stigma. Work a minimum wage job? Stigma. Not married at 30? Stigma. Even being rich has a stigma, because many people seem to just assume rich people are snobs.

Has anyone else noticed this? Basically everything has a stigma. You can't even shop at Wal-Mart without some people saying its a poor person's store. I've even read online, some people say an associate degree isn't a "real" college degree.

Pretty much anything you can think of is stigmatized. You can't even be smart, because if you are, people will consider you a nerd.

Have you ever noticed this?

Sadly it is human nature to judge.

I feel it can all get incredibly overwhelming, too, especially if you suffer from any form of social anxiety, insecurity, or self-consciousness. You need to be tough to succeed in this world, and most don't.

@Sevenizz said:

Ignore the fake news. It’s the Left’s way of making you feel inferior just for existing and forcing you to adopt a globalist agenda.

Jesus dude, give it a rest.

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#7 Posted by Byshop (19520 posts) -

@qx0d said:

Stigma basically means shame or embarrassment.

I've realized that almost everything in America has a stigma attached to it. Thinking about going to community college? That has a stigma. Work a minimum wage job? Stigma. Not married at 30? Stigma. Even being rich has a stigma, because many people seem to just assume rich people are snobs.

Has anyone else noticed this? Basically everything has a stigma. You can't even shop at Wal-Mart without some people saying its a poor person's store. I've even read online, some people say an associate degree isn't a "real" college degree.

Pretty much anything you can think of is stigmatized. You can't even be smart, because if you are, people will consider you a nerd.

Have you ever noticed this?

Honestly it sounds like you spend way too much time and energy worrying about what other people think about you.

-Byshop

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#8 Posted by Mandzilla (3803 posts) -
@Sevenizz said:

Ignore the fake news. It’s the Left’s way of making you feel inferior just for existing and forcing you to adopt a globalist agenda.

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#9 Posted by THUMPTABLE (2078 posts) -

@Sevenizz said:

Ignore the fake news. It’s the Left’s way of making you feel inferior just for existing and forcing you to adopt a globalist agenda.

Why are the politics in the US so polarising?? Your statement is bizarre...

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#10 Posted by THUMPTABLE (2078 posts) -

@qx0d said:

Stigma basically means shame or embarrassment.

I've realized that almost everything in America has a stigma attached to it. Thinking about going to community college? That has a stigma. Work a minimum wage job? Stigma. Not married at 30? Stigma. Even being rich has a stigma, because many people seem to just assume rich people are snobs.

Has anyone else noticed this? Basically everything has a stigma. You can't even shop at Wal-Mart without some people saying its a poor person's store. I've even read online, some people say an associate degree isn't a "real" college degree.

Pretty much anything you can think of is stigmatized. You can't even be smart, because if you are, people will consider you a nerd.

Have you ever noticed this?

When you say community college, do you mean a government uni?

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#11 Posted by Gaming-Planet (19891 posts) -

Just tell them to **** their standards.

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#12 Posted by SaltSlasher (946 posts) -

I don't know about other parts of the county, but a lot of those are older era stimgas that mostly just for the women gossipers in the neighborhood.

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#13 Edited by mirgamer (2489 posts) -

As an outsider looking in, american society seem to be very judgemental.

Funnily enough, left side, right side or whatever, they make a big noise and show about diversity and acceptance yet they still end up sounding and being very judgemental. Always looking for something to blame and demonise somehow.

Maybe its just that american prizes being very vocal and speaking out what you are thinking whereas in other societies people are a lot more reserved so thats why it seems like in the US, everything is so very visibly polarised.

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#14 Edited by X_Karen_x (500 posts) -

@qx0d:

It not even mean that😉

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#15 Edited by watercrack445 (1346 posts) -

People stigmatize farting in public even in some cases private. I hold a long held dream that one day people can freely fart in public without judgement. Actually, we should protest by farting with loud speakers. Once people start hearing about it they will get used to all the different farting sounds. Eventually, more and more people will start farting in public. Maybe we could even do a musical. Wow, what a fantastic idea.

But this just a dream. I don't think this be legalize during my generation. It would take centuries just to get at least over 50% agreeing with farting in public. I don't care about the minority. It's a democracy and if the majority thinks it's ok then it's good.

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#16 Posted by LJS9502_basic (166197 posts) -

@Sevenizz said:

Ignore the fake news. It’s the Left’s way of making you feel inferior just for existing and forcing you to adopt a globalist agenda.

I really hate when everything in life has to result in political comments. Step outside and live dude.

Anyway I guess it depends on who you know. I don't notice those stigmas around here.

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#17 Posted by jun_aka_pekto (25225 posts) -
@watercrack445 said:

People stigmatize farting in public even in some cases private. I hold a long held dream that one day people can freely fart in public without judgement. Actually, we should protest by farting with loud speakers. Once people start hearing about it they will get used to all the different farting sounds. Eventually, more and more people will start farting in public. Maybe we could even do a musical. Wow, what a fantastic idea.

But this just a dream. I don't think this be legalize during my generation. It would take centuries just to get at least over 50% agreeing with farting in public. I don't care about the minority. It's a democracy and if the majority thinks it's ok then it's good.

I don't think people have problems with the noise. I think it's the smell. Some aren't even farts anymore.

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#18 Posted by mrbojangles25 (43558 posts) -

@THUMPTABLE said:
@qx0d said:

...

When you say community college, do you mean a government uni?

"community college" (or "junior college") is generally a two-year degree school where you go to get your associates degree.

In the US, post K-12 schooling is structured as the following:

  • Trade school
  • For-profit universities
  • Community/junior colleges ("2-year" degrees)
  • Four year degree schools ("college" or "university", where you get your "bachelors of ________" degree)
  • Masters degree, if desired (after four-year degree)
  • Doctorate degree, if desired (after masters degree)

The reason people look down on community college is because there are little to no requirements to get in, you don't need to really go through an application process and have good grades to get in. With that said, they are incredibly good options for people that are smart but didn't get good grades in high school, or people looking to save some money because the credit you earn in community college often counts towards a four year degree.

So, for example, you might spend a fraction of the cost per quarter at a JC, boost your GPA, and work towards your college credit prior to going to get your 4-year degree (Bachelor of ________ degree), then when you do go to a four-year school you A.) only need to spend 2-3 years there, and B.) only need to take major classes, which are a lot more interesting than the general ed you already took.

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#19 Edited by plageus900 (2653 posts) -

@mrbojangles25: An Associate of Science degree and 4 years of semiconductor manufacturing experience led me to a managment position that requires a masters degree.

Two year degrees are often underrated, however people shouldn't just stop there. I used mine to get myself into a private university.

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#20 Posted by shellcase86 (4324 posts) -

@mrbojangles25 said:
@THUMPTABLE said:
@qx0d said:

...

When you say community college, do you mean a government uni?

"community college" (or "junior college") is generally a two-year degree school where you go to get your associates degree.

In the US, post K-12 schooling is structured as the following:

  • Trade school
  • For-profit universities
  • Community/junior colleges ("2-year" degrees)
  • Four year degree schools ("college" or "university", where you get your "bachelors of ________" degree)
  • Masters degree, if desired (after four-year degree)
  • Doctorate degree, if desired (after masters degree)

Not that I disagree, but adding the "if desired" portion to only the masters and doctorate portions implies that all the options prior to it are required/necessary -- reinforcing OP's point.

I don't think that was your point, but it seemed odd to include that wording in those portions.

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#21 Posted by HEATHEN75 (643 posts) -

Try not giving a shit what random people think about you. Life is much more enjoyable that way.

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#24 Posted by goodzorr (488 posts) -

I'm not American, but the three times I've visited have been amazing. Incredibly nice people. See, I can generalise, too :P (but no seriously, my holidays there were amazing).