When you get depressed how do you break out of it?

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warmblur

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#1 warmblur
Member since 2017 • 7524 Posts

Just curious if any of you suffer from depression what helps you break out of it at least temporarily? I've had depression for about 25 years now I've run the gambit of treatments, everything from talk therapy, anti depressants, supplements, CBD etc...When my depression is at it's worst I get this heaviness feeling inside my head almost a claustrophobic feeling like the walls are closing in on me. But anyways what works for me the best right now is THC not alot but just enough to break me out of that sinking feeling it has done wonders for me. Just wondering what works for you guys when you get in a depression?

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GirlUSoCrazy

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#2  Edited By GirlUSoCrazy
Member since 2015 • 13176 Posts

Mindfulness practice. It's slow but effective and lasting.

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johnd13

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#3 johnd13
Member since 2011 • 10517 Posts

Going for a walk. It really helps clear my mind.

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warmblur

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#4  Edited By warmblur
Member since 2017 • 7524 Posts

@girlusocrazy said:

Mindfulness practice. It's slow but effective and lasting.

Can you give a few examples please not sure what you mean exactly.

@johnd13 said:

Going for a walk. It really helps clear my mind.

Yeah, walking definitely helps especially somewhere peaceful.

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GirlUSoCrazy

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#5  Edited By GirlUSoCrazy
Member since 2015 • 13176 Posts

@warmblur: There is a good breakdown here, but mostly this:

One part is meditation where you sit for 10 minutes and observe your thoughts, noticing if there are automatic reactions to them, and noting what those reactions are, what your feelings are. Saying "I am reacting X way. I am feeling Y." every time there is a thought.

Then you can do a meditation where you focus on your body and noticing where there is tension. Then you ask yourself "can we relax this part just a little bit?" and move on to the next.

Another part is during your regular day, noticing when you are doing things on autopilot, automatically reacting, vs when you are doing things thoughtfully and with intent.

Eventually you feel less pressure, stress, and do less ruminating, and you think more clearly and constructively. It's a slow process, like skimming scum off the top of a pond every day, and then coming back the next day to remove more, until eventually things are a lot cleaner.

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omegaMaster

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#6 omegaMaster
Member since 2017 • 1847 Posts

I think I may have had mild symptoms of depression, but I do have anxiety and worry quite a bit.

Do some exercise and hit the gym, it helps eliminate negtivity and focus on your health and fitness.

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br0kenrabbit

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#7 br0kenrabbit  Online
Member since 2004 • 16818 Posts

Best thing for me is hang out with a friend or two. Sit on the porch and shoot the shit for an evening or go throw some disc golf.

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madrocketeer

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#8 madrocketeer
Member since 2005 • 8916 Posts

Nihilism. I get bouts of melancholy sometimes, but I always recover by remembering that none of this matters a damn, and gradually got back to my usual chill self.

Though I should note; I am not a Nihilist. It's just a useful philosophical starting point. To sum up myself; let's just say Nietzsche wasn't a Nihilist either, and I'm of a somewhat similar mind.

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Sancho_Panzer

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#9  Edited By Sancho_Panzer
Member since 2015 • 1782 Posts

Exercise is the quickest way out for me. Sunshine helps a lot too.

Other than that, I sort of steer into it a bit and then thrash about until it turns into a productive kind of mania. It's oddly effective.

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warmblur

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#10  Edited By warmblur
Member since 2017 • 7524 Posts

@girlusocrazy said:

@warmblur: There is a good breakdown here, but mostly this:

One part is meditation where you sit for 10 minutes and observe your thoughts, noticing if there are automatic reactions to them, and noting what those reactions are, what your feelings are. Saying "I am reacting X way. I am feeling Y." every time there is a thought.

Then you can do a meditation where you focus on your body and noticing where there is tension. Then you ask yourself "can we relax this part just a little bit?" and move on to the next.

Another part is during your regular day, noticing when you are doing things on autopilot, automatically reacting, vs when you are doing things thoughtfully and with intent.

Eventually you feel less pressure, stress, and do less ruminating, and you think more clearly and constructively. It's a slow process, like skimming scum off the top of a pond every day, and then coming back the next day to remove more, until eventually things are a lot cleaner.

Thanks I might give mediation a shot I only did a little bit along time ago.

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#11 dracula_16
Member since 2005 • 14980 Posts

I go for a walk. I live near a river and a forest; it's fun to relax and sit by the river. There are a lot of good places to stop and meditate or pray.

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mrbojangles25

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#12 mrbojangles25
Member since 2005 • 50220 Posts

I tend to endure it longer than I need to, inflict harm on my body (in my case, binge eating and gaining weight and feeling gross...in others, it could be alcohol or drugs or cutting and so on), and then after I finally get a goods night sleep and maybe have a nice day I sort of snap out of it.

I'm actually going through a pretty bad slump right now of serious depression but thus far I am fighting the good fight and hanging in there, at least on the physical side. Mentally I'm like "Man, where is that giant asteroid they keep saying will wipe us out" :D

Honestly though, I just do quick meditations or midnfulness stuff. I tend to just do the whole "breathe in for five seconds, hold breath for five seconds, then breathe out for five seconds" until my mind is blank. Then, before any other thought comes into my mind, I focus on something positive. Could be a joke, something my niece or nephew did recently, a good deed I did, or just the lyrics of a song I like. That more or less starts a chain reaction of "good thoughts" that I can hold on to.

@girlusocrazy said:

Mindfulness practice. It's slow but effective and lasting.

It IS slow, and difficult.

But it really does work.

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GirlUSoCrazy

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#13  Edited By GirlUSoCrazy
Member since 2015 • 13176 Posts

@mrbojangles25: Been there, getting no sleep and a struggle to get through the day, barely enjoying anything and when I did I was trying to cling to it and keep it going somehow. I couldn't take it anymore, thinking "living like this doesn't make sense, it isn't normal having this much trouble." I got meds to help with sleep primarily, and it also helped with mood in a subtle way. That broke the cycle for me. I did mindfulness during that time which helped me get back to the present moment instead of ruminating. After a while that just came naturally and I didn't need the meds and I kept it going by myself. I never thought it could happen but you just gotta find the right thing that works for you, keep trying.

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#14  Edited By Gaming-Planet  Online
Member since 2008 • 20751 Posts

I'm literally broken but I've found that NDRI's work better for me than SSRI's, at least for now. I tried doing without psych meds for 2 years, and within those 2 years it went from being really great to really awful very gradually. It just became a pretty bad case of dysthymia and it destroyed my self esteem in the process. My grades tanked, my relationship was affected, and I just stopped caring about my hobbies in general. It got so bad to the point where socializing just felt painful and my productivity went into the drain.

I have PTSD and never got proper therapy for it, and for some odd reason it got really bad when I was off the meds and manifested itself in very strange ways where I felt like my life was being threatened whenever someone was hostile towards me or in my personal space. As for my depression, I feel like just doing good things for myself makes me feel good. Like being productive, exercising, socializing. It was only until recently where none of those worked so I went back on antidepressants and wish I had done so earlier.

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Speeny

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#15 Speeny
Member since 2018 • 2944 Posts

I either just end up getting over it with time or I’ll try to distract my mind with the things I’m passionate about.

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#16  Edited By jaydan
Member since 2015 • 4961 Posts

Being self-aware of depressive patterns and a willingness to confront them and identify with what causes problems is a great start.

Often times when I ask people why they're feeling depressed, the most frequent response is people don't know why they're depressed and that it might just be abstract and nothing else to it; there are almost always reasons why people become depressed, and something that triggers it.

It could be a matter of getting yelled at by your boss at work or maybe you're peering too heavily into the lives of other people as projected on social media, or perhaps you've been holding onto deep-rooted secrets you'd rather file away into the back and pretend it doesn't exist. There's a lot of reasons why people can fall into depression, yet so many fail to identify the causes and so many insist there isn't a cause that triggers their depression.

I think it is important to identify and confront those triggers than act like they don't exist at all.

That's just the first step to recovery: becoming self-aware, but depression is seldom subsided overnight. From then it's important to take steady action to counter-adjust your own triggers.

Maybe being overweight and unhealthy is the source of your depression: and maybe taking more walks and planning out a weightloss system is a great counter-adjustment that will ultimately liberate you from your own problems when you start to get back in shape.

Do more of that, even if you think there's no reason - there probably is. Sometimes reasons are merely unclear at first but they will come to you if you allow yourself the openness to confront from within.

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GirlUSoCrazy

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#17 GirlUSoCrazy
Member since 2015 • 13176 Posts

I think that's why mindfulness and examining your automatic reactions vs intentional reactions helps you track down the source of the issue. At the same time it trains you to be calm and constructive instead of tense up automatically and fall back on knee jerk reactions that are ultimately self destructive.

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jaydan

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#18 jaydan
Member since 2015 • 4961 Posts

I must add that confronting and cushioning depression with bad and destructive habits (like overeating, drinking, doing drugs, etc.) is NEVER a good option yet they're the easiest options to reach for. "Curing" depression with a night of heavy drinking only delays and builds up greater problems down the road. This is how people get so far down the rabbit hole that they can't dig out of it in any easy manner.

Identify good vs. bad habits, and capitalize on good habits with good long-term effects. At the end of the day to cure depression, you want to create long-term barriers that will prepare you from any and all future episodes. You want to be prepared not only for your current episode but all future episodes.

I've always looked at my struggles with a light at the end of the tunnel. Sometimes the light isn't always immediately visible, but as long as I hold the belief there is indeed light at the end, that's enough to push me forward until I see the passage. How do I know there's always light at the end of the tunnel even if it's not visible? Because I've already been-there-done-that many times, hence being aware of my patterns. If I already pulled through my struggles in the past, I can certainly pull through the next time; only difference, is each time I become much more aware and confident of these dark tunnels I've been through, and get a greater grasp on navigating myself.

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warmblur

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#19  Edited By warmblur
Member since 2017 • 7524 Posts

@speeny said:

I either just end up getting over it with time or I’ll try to distract my mind with the things I’m passionate about.

I wish I could do that but unfortunately alot of my depression comes from permanent health issues so I can't just get over it but I'm the moron that put myself in this situation. But I do agree that distracting your mind with things helps no doubt about that.

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Serraph105

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#20  Edited By Serraph105
Member since 2007 • 35321 Posts

Well I don't have clinical depression that needs medication to balance out a chemical imbalance that's in my body. For people (like yourself it seems TC) I highly recommend going that route, go to a doctor, tell them what you are going through, and get prescribed what you need to help you balance out. And yes I do know how difficult that process can be, but if you need it then you need it.

That said, when I get depressed the best thing I can do for myself is to get up, get moving, and do some work. Either work that I get paid for or household chores. It doesn't really matter which one I do because when I focus my thoughts on accomplishing something my thoughts are no longer on the thing I'm depressed about.

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warmblur

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#21 warmblur
Member since 2017 • 7524 Posts

@Serraph105 said:

Well I don't have clinical depression that needs medication to balance out a chemical imbalance that's in my body. For people (like yourself it seems TC) I highly recommend going that route, go to a doctor, tell them what you are going through, and get prescribed what you need to help you balance out. And yes I do know how difficult that process can be, but if you need it then you need it.

That said, when I get depressed the best thing I can do for myself is to get up, get moving, and do some work. Either work that I get paid for or household chores. It doesn't really matter which one I do because when I focus my thoughts on accomplishing something my thoughts are no longer on the thing I'm depressed about.

Unfortunately I can't take antidepressants anymore it messes with my physical health condition I tried multiple times but just ended up messes my body up even more.

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Serraph105

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#22 Serraph105
Member since 2007 • 35321 Posts

@warmblur: that's too bad man. I hope you figureout a workable solution for yourself. Depression is a rough thing to deal with.

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warmblur

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#23 warmblur
Member since 2017 • 7524 Posts

@Serraph105 said:

@warmblur: that's too bad man. I hope you figureout a workable solution for yourself. Depression is a rough thing to deal with.

Thanks man.

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#24 SOedipus
Member since 2006 • 13339 Posts

I get bouts of it every couple years, usually hits me in the summer. Spending time with people and keeping busy helps. Being alone is the worst, for me anyway. I'll take extra shifts if they're offered just so I'm out of the house and doing something. When I am alone, I use the time to workout. I do it excessively as well. I feel a lot better afterwards, but I've done some harm to my joints. It sucks. It's not like I would do anything else, as I wouldn't get any enjoyment from video games or watching stuff when I'm depressed. Medication can help, but everyone reacts to them in their own way. If I take SSRIs I'm not on them long. Just enough to get that energy that can help motivate me to go from destructive habits (overeating) to better ones (working out), then I go off them. I found CBD oil to be okay, but I find it better for anxiety than I do for depression.

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warmblur

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#25 warmblur
Member since 2017 • 7524 Posts

@SOedipus said:

I get bouts of it every couple years, usually hits me in the summer. Spending time with people and keeping busy helps. Being alone is the worst, for me anyway. I'll take extra shifts if they're offered just so I'm out of the house and doing something. When I am alone, I use the time to workout. I do it excessively as well. I feel a lot better afterwards, but I've done some harm to my joints. It sucks. It's not like I would do anything else, as I wouldn't get any enjoyment from video games or watching stuff when I'm depressed. Medication can help, but everyone reacts to them in their own way. If I take SSRIs I'm not on them long. Just enough to get that energy that can help motivate me to go from destructive habits (overeating) to better ones (working out), then I go off them. I found CBD oil to be okay, but I find it better for anxiety than I do for depression.

So true it's also great for sleeping and inflammation.

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#26 comp_atkins
Member since 2005 • 37192 Posts

@br0kenrabbit said:

Best thing for me is hang out with a friend or two. Sit on the porch and shoot the shit for an evening or go throw some disc golf.

he frolfs! he scores!

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#27 br0kenrabbit  Online
Member since 2004 • 16818 Posts

@comp_atkins said:
@br0kenrabbit said:

Best thing for me is hang out with a friend or two. Sit on the porch and shoot the shit for an evening or go throw some disc golf.

he frolfs! he scores!

Disc Golf:

-is free

-is outside

-is nearby

-is fun to throw things at other things

By the fourth or fifth hole, we've usually already forgotten who's ahead. It's just a nice casual game that beats sitting around on a nice day.

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uninspiredcup

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#28 uninspiredcup
Member since 2013 • 45724 Posts

I've found the best way to keep yourself feeling like shit it to keep yourself busy either through menial tasks or learning.

Even if it's something little, the sense of achievement/progress is a moral boost.

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#29 vic11con
Member since 2021 • 1 Posts

I try and indulge my mind in some other activities, I try to socialize as well just to divert my mind from the thoughts causing depression. But it's hard and nothing really works for long. Only time heals you.

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#30 BdazmedPrim
Member since 2021 • 51 Posts

As I think, it's important to know who are you for yourself - to know your inside true wishes and dreams.

For extroverts and introverts, it'll be different for example.
When you know what you want and what do you like to do or something, you can go to it.

When I have depression and feel sucks, I just try to remember again for what I have come to this Planet. I think about what I have now and for what I can be appreciated, say thanks to God and to my families.

I use different practices to powered it - meditation, kundalini yoga, listening and singing my favorite songs, walking and make fits. Being with friends or those who love is a great idea too!
As an introvert, I like to be alone with nature in beautiful places and making my favorite hobbies besides gaming. Reading holy scriptures helps me too because it makes my mind clear and takes me to higher vibrations away from sickness and depression. When I think about love in the World or my families, about thanks to the Lord, I don't think about depression - destructive feelings and thoughts are gone. Our mind just can't think both of it at the same time