The ophthalmologist said I can go blind in my right eye

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#1 Posted by LegitGamer3212 (1619 posts) -

I would really like to get your opinion about something....so 2 months ago I got hit in the eye by a handball in the right eye. It wasn't a very hard hit but it wasn't very light either. The very next day I saw a constant small black dot in my right eye that wouldn't go away. This went away in a week. I went to my ophthalmologist yesterday and he told me I have a small retinal tear from the hit. The only treatment to seal up the tear is with a laser, it takes about 5 minutes. However, after the laser there's a chance I'll see a small blurry greyish area on the top right corner of my right eye, basically after the laser that area of the eye will be like a dead zone. If I don't do anything (no laser) there's a 10% chance the retinal can detach and I can lose vision, 90% this won't happen.
I have done some research online and some doctors say a small retinal tear like mine on the side of the eye will heal on its own. If it's close to the Macular it's more dangerous. Some people say the percentage of retina detachment from a retinal tear is lower than 10%, some claim it's 2%. I'm 24 years old and would hate to live with bad or no vision for the rest of my life. Please...I would like your honest opinion about what I should do....it's been really stressing me out.

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#2 Posted by jasean79 (2593 posts) -

I would leave it be and take the chance that it heals on its own.

Did the doctor say what the percentage of seeing a "dead zone" would be if you had the laser corrective surgery?

Or, if you let it go and 6 months or a year from now it doesn't heal, can you elect to go with the surgery then?

Rule of thumb for me is, if you can potentially heal without surgery, do that. No matter what the surgery is, anytime they go in and start messing around with corrective procedures, you'll never be 100% anyway. So, why not take the chance and let your body do the healing?

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#3 Posted by Nuck81 (6979 posts) -

Stop masturbating

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#4 Posted by Master_Live (18821 posts) -

I would seek a second opinion, not from Gamespot, but from another ophthalmologist of course. This is your eye, your vision. Whatever a visit with a different medical professional cost it is more than worth it when you weight the possible outcomes.

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#5 Posted by Shadowchronicle (26969 posts) -

@Master_Live said:

I would seek a second opinion, not from Gamespot, but from another ophthalmologist of course. This is your eye, your vision. Whatever a visit with a different medical professional cost it is more than worth it when you weight the possible outcomes.

This please. Don't weigh your decisions on what people say in a forum especially for something like this.

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#6 Posted by thegerg (18397 posts) -

@Master_Live said:

I would seek a second opinion, not from Gamespot, but from another ophthalmologist of course.

This X 1,000,000. Why is this not the first step you take?

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#7 Edited by sherman-tank1 (8315 posts) -

You should also find a way to discover the experiences of people who went through the same dilemma you are facing, and what they would say to do.

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#8 Posted by Serraph105 (32123 posts) -

I agree with Master_Live on this get a second opinion, and make sure it's an eye doctor not us.

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#9 Posted by LegitGamer3212 (1619 posts) -

@jasean79 said:

I would leave it be and take the chance that it heals on its own.

Did the doctor say what the percentage of seeing a "dead zone" would be if you had the laser corrective surgery?

Or, if you let it go and 6 months or a year from now it doesn't heal, can you elect to go with the surgery then?

Rule of thumb for me is, if you can potentially heal without surgery, do that. No matter what the surgery is, anytime they go in and start messing around with corrective procedures, you'll never be 100% anyway. So, why not take the chance and let your body do the healing?

He didn't say what the percentage of seeing a dead zone is. If it doesn't heal in 6 months to a year I can still do the laser surgery.
I was thinking.....so right now I can see fine my vision in both my eyes are good, after the laser chances are I'll see a blurry spot. This means the outcome of the surgery is worse.

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#10 Posted by chessmaster1989 (30204 posts) -

Get a second opinion

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#11 Edited by BranKetra (51726 posts) -
@shadowchronicle said:

@Master_Live said:

I would seek a second opinion, not from Gamespot, but from another ophthalmologist of course. This is your eye, your vision. Whatever a visit with a different medical professional cost it is more than worth it when you weight the possible outcomes.

This please. Don't weigh your decisions on what people say in a forum especially for something like this.

Unless a user here is another ophthalmologist, I recommend this advice.

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#12 Posted by Gaming-Planet (19113 posts) -

Ouch. I nearly blinded myself last week when I landed my fall directly to my eye on the sharp corner of my desk. It busted my eyelid open and my eyeball had like a blood spot, luckily my vision is fine after the fall and my cornea was safe.

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#13 Edited by lamprey263 (34999 posts) -

Drinking a pregnant woman's breast milk should help with the healing... couldn't hurt at least, not unless she slaps you for asking anyways.

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#14 Posted by ShepardCommandr (4939 posts) -

personally i would just wear an eye patch like a boss

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#15 Edited by The_Last_Ride (76371 posts) -

that sucks, i hope it goes well

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#16 Posted by LegitGamer3212 (1619 posts) -

@chessmaster1989: So I did what everyone said and got a second opinion. The eye doctor today, who went to Harvard by the way, said it's NOT a retina tear or retina hole. However, she did say there was something irregular in the same spot where the 1st doctor said there was a retina tear. I asked how sure she was that it's not a retina tear she said she's 90-95% sure it's NOT a tear or hole. She doesn't know what it is. She referred me to a retina specialist to get it checked out to be 100% sure. Now I don't know what to do, 1st doctor is saying it's a tear, 2nd is saying it's not. I don't know what the 3rd will say.

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#17 Posted by Master_Live (18821 posts) -

@LegitGamer3212 said:

@chessmaster1989: So I did what everyone said and got a second opinion. The eye doctor today, who went to Harvard by the way, said it's NOT a retina tear or retina hole. However, she did say there was something irregular in the same spot where the 1st doctor said there was a retina tear. I asked how sure she was that it's not a retina tear she said she's 90-95% sure it's NOT a tear or hole. She doesn't know what it is. She referred me to a retina specialist to get it checked out to be 100% sure. Now I don't know what to do, 1st doctor is saying it's a tear, 2nd is saying it's not. I don't know what the 3rd will say.

Well, the 3rd dude is a retina specialist so I think you are on the right track.

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#18 Posted by deeliman (3803 posts) -

What master live said

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#19 Posted by whipassmt (15375 posts) -

Yeah. The best advice would come from consulting multiple ophthamologists.

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#20 Edited by sonicare (55887 posts) -

Go see a retina specialist. They are a subgroup of ophthalmology that specializes in the retina. There are many different types of tears that can happen in the retina. Some are asymptomatic and small. These often occur naturally. Those usually are low risk to turn into detachment. If your tear is not what the call a "horseshoe tear" than the chance of detachment goes down.
However, if you got your tear from trauma and are symptomatic, you may be at higher risk. So see if you can have a retina doctor look at it.