Students Have No Moral Responsibility to Pay Back Federal Student Loans

  • 184 results
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4

This topic is locked from further discussion.

Avatar image for BluRayHiDef
BluRayHiDef

10839

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 2

User Lists: 0

#1 BluRayHiDef
Member since 2009 • 10839 Posts

The fact that the U.S. government lends money to naive, fresh-out-of-high-school eighteen year olds is reckless and irresponsible. An eighteen year old is still a teenager, though legally recognized as an adult. Considering that society (i.e. teachers, school counselors, television, etc) tells young people that college is the only way to succeed, and that - to be specific - attending a highly accredited private university is ideal, then it's to be expected that a naive eighteen year old is going to accept federal student loan money (assuming that they can't afford it without the aid) to attend college. To them, signing the dotted line is a mere formality on the road to success. Little do they know, college is not for everyone, so some of them wind up flunking out or dropping out, with tons of debt. 

I believe that such people have no moral responsibility in regard to paying the loans back. To lend tens or even hundreds of thousands of dollars to a naive eighteen year old, fresh out of high school, is stupid and manipulative.

Avatar image for Fightingfan
Fightingfan

38011

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 0

User Lists: 0

#2 Fightingfan
Member since 2010 • 38011 Posts
What does moral responsibility mean? You can't default on student loans; you have to pay or you can't own anything for the rest of your life.
Avatar image for CHOASXIII
CHOASXIII

14716

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 2

User Lists: 0

#3 CHOASXIII
Member since 2009 • 14716 Posts

Keep that idea, it will get you far OP. 

Avatar image for Ace6301
Ace6301

21389

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 1

User Lists: 0

#4 Ace6301
Member since 2005 • 21389 Posts
If you take out a loan you sure as hell better recognize that you're expected to pay it back. If people got out of loan payments because they felt they were mislead loans would cease to exist.
Avatar image for chessmaster1989
chessmaster1989

30203

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 8

User Lists: 0

#6 chessmaster1989
Member since 2008 • 30203 Posts
You're a fvcking moron.
Avatar image for Wasdie
Wasdie

53622

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 23

User Lists: 0

#7 Wasdie  Moderator
Member since 2003 • 53622 Posts

It's not an issue of morality. 

The government gave you money for you to go to school. You have to pay it back. You are legally obligated to pay them back. Before accepting the FAFSA loans you sign agreements that you will pay them back. You do not need to use federally sponsored student loans to go to school either. 

Avatar image for Fightingfan
Fightingfan

38011

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 0

User Lists: 0

#8 Fightingfan
Member since 2010 • 38011 Posts
You're a fvcking moron.chessmaster1989
It's his glaucoma medication.
Avatar image for 22Toothpicks
22Toothpicks

12546

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 0

User Lists: 0

#9 22Toothpicks
Member since 2005 • 12546 Posts
Being naive to the conditions of a contract one signs is not a valid excuse to skip on those conditions.
Avatar image for BluRayHiDef
BluRayHiDef

10839

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 2

User Lists: 0

#10 BluRayHiDef
Member since 2009 • 10839 Posts

It's not an issue of morality. 

The government gave you money for you to go to school. You have to pay it back. You are legally obligated to pay them back. Before accepting the FAFSA loans you sign agreements that you will pay them back. You do not need to use federally sponsored student loans to go to school either. 

Wasdie

I recogize that it's a legal responsibility, but am arguing that if someone refuses to live up to it, they shouldn't be criticized or stigmatized, which is often the case.

Avatar image for Fightingfan
Fightingfan

38011

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 0

User Lists: 0

#11 Fightingfan
Member since 2010 • 38011 Posts

[QUOTE="Wasdie"]

It's not an issue of morality. 

The government gave you money for you to go to school. You have to pay it back. You are legally obligated to pay them back. Before accepting the FAFSA loans you sign agreements that you will pay them back. You do not need to use federally sponsored student loans to go to school either. 

BluRayHiDef

I recogize that it's a legal responsibility, but am arguing that if someone refuses to live up to it, they shouldn't be criticized or stigmatized, which is often the case.

Who knows you're 20k in debt unless you tell them? I doubt the average person knows my debit, though they assume I'm wealthy due to the symbol on the top of my truck, which is completely wrong.
Avatar image for GummiRaccoon
GummiRaccoon

13799

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 0

User Lists: 0

#12 GummiRaccoon
Member since 2003 • 13799 Posts

The fact that the U.S. government lends money to naive, fresh-out-of-high-school eighteen year olds is reckless and irresponsible. An eighteen year old is still a teenager, though legally recognized as an adult. Considering that society (i.e. teachers, school counselors, television, etc) tells young people that college is the only way to succeed, and that - to be specific - attending a highly accredited private university is ideal, then it's to be expected that a naive eighteen year old is going to accept federal student loan money (assuming that they can't afford it without the aid) to attend college. To them, signing the dotted line is a mere formality on the road to success. Little do they know, college is not for everyone, so some of them wind up flunking out or dropping out, with tons of debt. 

I believe that such people have no moral responsibility in regard to paying the loans back. To lend tens or even hundreds of thousands of dollars to a naive eighteen year old, fresh out of high school, is stupid and manipulative.

BluRayHiDef

College is pushed far too much as being the key to success.  I know a lot of people that got a lot of really pointless degrees (liberal arts of some kind), after being told that employers just look at the fact that you were smart enough to get a degree and will consider you.

In many professions, getting a degree can be very important but only if it is the right degree. 

For instance, I know a girl that got a degree in chicano studies and is stuck selling books at barnes & noble, as she can't find any jobs that need a chicano studies degree and all of her work history is working at barnes & noble.

 

My wife has a BA in child development and she is a preschool teacher, her degree is very necessary for her work.  


College is important for society, but having a bunch of liberal arts majors working as cashiers with massive debt doesn't help anyone.

Avatar image for Master_Live
Master_Live

20510

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 0

User Lists: 7

#13 Master_Live
Member since 2004 • 20510 Posts
Good, those who think like you shouldn't pay back the loans, just deal with consequences.
Avatar image for Master_Live
Master_Live

20510

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 0

User Lists: 7

#14 Master_Live
Member since 2004 • 20510 Posts

[QUOTE="Wasdie"]

It's not an issue of morality. 

The government gave you money for you to go to school. You have to pay it back. You are legally obligated to pay them back. Before accepting the FAFSA loans you sign agreements that you will pay them back. You do not need to use federally sponsored student loans to go to school either. 

BluRayHiDef

they shouldn't be criticized or stigmatized, which is often the case.

So what should happen?
Avatar image for TacticalDesire
TacticalDesire

10713

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 0

User Lists: 0

#15 TacticalDesire
Member since 2010 • 10713 Posts

[QUOTE="BluRayHiDef"]

[QUOTE="Wasdie"]

It's not an issue of morality. 

The government gave you money for you to go to school. You have to pay it back. You are legally obligated to pay them back. Before accepting the FAFSA loans you sign agreements that you will pay them back. You do not need to use federally sponsored student loans to go to school either. 

Fightingfan

I recogize that it's a legal responsibility, but am arguing that if someone refuses to live up to it, they shouldn't be criticized or stigmatized, which is often the case.

Who knows you're 20k in debt unless you tell them? I doubt the average person knows my debit, though they assume I'm wealthy due to the symbol on the top of my truck, which is completely wrong.

Don't tell me you've stuck a Bentley badge on your truck :P.

Avatar image for TacticalDesire
TacticalDesire

10713

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 0

User Lists: 0

#16 TacticalDesire
Member since 2010 • 10713 Posts

Being naive to the conditions of a contract one signs is not a valid excuse to skip on those conditions.22Toothpicks

That's not entirely true.  A contract with a minor is voidable, which is why most organizations will not enter into a contract with a person under 18 without a co-signer.  Courts have also ruled certain contracts voidable when it is clear that one party took advantage of the other through a language barrier or something similar.

Avatar image for deactivated-6127ced9bcba0
deactivated-6127ced9bcba0

31700

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 1

User Lists: 0

#17 deactivated-6127ced9bcba0
Member since 2006 • 31700 Posts

Everyone has a moral obligation to pay back debts that they accrue.

Avatar image for BluRayHiDef
BluRayHiDef

10839

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 2

User Lists: 0

#18 BluRayHiDef
Member since 2009 • 10839 Posts

[QUOTE="BluRayHiDef"]

[QUOTE="Wasdie"]

It's not an issue of morality. 

The government gave you money for you to go to school. You have to pay it back. You are legally obligated to pay them back. Before accepting the FAFSA loans you sign agreements that you will pay them back. You do not need to use federally sponsored student loans to go to school either. 

Master_Live

they shouldn't be criticized or stigmatized, which is often the case.

p

So what should happen?

They should be respected for their decision. As for what should be done in regard to all outstanding student loan debt, it should be forgiven by the government en masse, just as the banks were forgiven.

Avatar image for Fightingfan
Fightingfan

38011

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 0

User Lists: 0

#19 Fightingfan
Member since 2010 • 38011 Posts

[QUOTE="22Toothpicks"]Being naive to the conditions of a contract one signs is not a valid excuse to skip on those conditions.TacticalDesire

That's not entirely true.  A contract with a minor is voidable, which is why most organizations will not enter into a contract with a person under 18 without a co-signer.  Courts have also ruled certain contracts voidable when it is clear that one party took advantage of the other through a language barrier or something similar.

Pretty hard to prove a judge you were too stupid to recognize the conditions of a contract. I don't see hot rats who sign up with sprint, att, and verizon using that in court.
Avatar image for deactivated-5b78379493e12
deactivated-5b78379493e12

15625

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 12

User Lists: 0

#20 deactivated-5b78379493e12
Member since 2005 • 15625 Posts

Regardless of the source of the load, public or private, you are obligated to play the loan back. Remember that teenagers aren't always making the decision on their own. A significant number of college students rely on funds from parents, and the parents are co-signers of the loans. The parents are part of that responsibility. You cannot place this on naive teenagers.

I'd really like to see how far this philosophy takes you. If you aren't fined or arrested for defaulting on a loan in the long term, you will look all useful relationships, personal and public, because no one will be trusting enough to give anything to you.

Avatar image for 22Toothpicks
22Toothpicks

12546

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 0

User Lists: 0

#21 22Toothpicks
Member since 2005 • 12546 Posts

[QUOTE="22Toothpicks"]Being naive to the conditions of a contract one signs is not a valid excuse to skip on those conditions.TacticalDesire

That's not entirely true.  A contract with a minor is voidable, which is why most organizations will not enter into a contract with a person under 18 without a co-signer.  Courts have also ruled certain contracts voidable when it is clear that one party took advantage of the other through a language barrier or something similar.

Well, I stand corrected.
Avatar image for TacticalDesire
TacticalDesire

10713

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 0

User Lists: 0

#22 TacticalDesire
Member since 2010 • 10713 Posts

[QUOTE="TacticalDesire"]

[QUOTE="22Toothpicks"]Being naive to the conditions of a contract one signs is not a valid excuse to skip on those conditions.Fightingfan

That's not entirely true.  A contract with a minor is voidable, which is why most organizations will not enter into a contract with a person under 18 without a co-signer.  Courts have also ruled certain contracts voidable when it is clear that one party took advantage of the other through a language barrier or something similar.

Pretty hard to prove a judge you were too stupid to recognize the conditions of a contract. I don't see hot rats who sign up with sprint, att, and verizon using that in court.

Oh, in a situation such as student loans which OP is describing it'd be nigh impossible unless the person had a mental handicap, but the point is that there are laws in place to protect people who are unfairly manipulated into a contract.

Avatar image for TacticalDesire
TacticalDesire

10713

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 0

User Lists: 0

#23 TacticalDesire
Member since 2010 • 10713 Posts

[QUOTE="TacticalDesire"]

[QUOTE="22Toothpicks"]Being naive to the conditions of a contract one signs is not a valid excuse to skip on those conditions.22Toothpicks

That's not entirely true.  A contract with a minor is voidable, which is why most organizations will not enter into a contract with a person under 18 without a co-signer.  Courts have also ruled certain contracts voidable when it is clear that one party took advantage of the other through a language barrier or something similar.

Well, I stand corrected.

For what it's worth though none of those claims would work for a normal 18 year old signing onto a student loan, so in most cases you're right:P

Avatar image for BluRayHiDef
BluRayHiDef

10839

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 2

User Lists: 0

#24 BluRayHiDef
Member since 2009 • 10839 Posts

Regardless of the source of the load, public or private, you are obligated to play the loan back. Remember that teenagers aren't always making the decision on their own. A significant number of college students rely on funds from parents, and the parents are co-signers of the loans. The parents are part of that responsibility. You cannot place this on naive teenagers.

I'd really like to see how far this philosophy takes you. If you aren't fined or arrested for defaulting on a loan in the long term, you will look all useful relationships, personal and public, because no one will be trusting enough to give anything to you.

jimkabrhel

 

What about the students that are declared wards of the state or as independents because they don't have parents? Those students sign the loans on their own.

 

Avatar image for deactivated-5b1e62582e305
deactivated-5b1e62582e305

30778

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 3

User Lists: 0

#25 deactivated-5b1e62582e305
Member since 2004 • 30778 Posts

Morals don't mean shit if your life is ruined.

Avatar image for TacticalDesire
TacticalDesire

10713

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 0

User Lists: 0

#26 TacticalDesire
Member since 2010 • 10713 Posts

[QUOTE="jimkabrhel"]

Regardless of the source of the load, public or private, you are obligated to play the loan back. Remember that teenagers aren't always making the decision on their own. A significant number of college students rely on funds from parents, and the parents are co-signers of the loans. The parents are part of that responsibility. You cannot place this on naive teenagers.

I'd really like to see how far this philosophy takes you. If you aren't fined or arrested for defaulting on a loan in the long term, you will look all useful relationships, personal and public, because no one will be trusting enough to give anything to you.

BluRayHiDef

 

What about the students that are declared wards of the state or as independents because they don't have parents? Those students sign the loans on their own.

 

Even if you're considered an independent for tax purposes your parents can still co-sign a loan with you.  Hell, anyone can be a co-signer.

Avatar image for Flubbbs
Flubbbs

4968

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 0

User Lists: 0

#27 Flubbbs
Member since 2010 • 4968 Posts

they will pay or the government will just garnish their wages, take your tax refunds, etc

Avatar image for Fightingfan
Fightingfan

38011

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 0

User Lists: 0

#28 Fightingfan
Member since 2010 • 38011 Posts

[QUOTE="jimkabrhel"]

Regardless of the source of the load, public or private, you are obligated to play the loan back. Remember that teenagers aren't always making the decision on their own. A significant number of college students rely on funds from parents, and the parents are co-signers of the loans. The parents are part of that responsibility. You cannot place this on naive teenagers.

I'd really like to see how far this philosophy takes you. If you aren't fined or arrested for defaulting on a loan in the long term, you will look all useful relationships, personal and public, because no one will be trusting enough to give anything to you.

BluRayHiDef

 

What about the students that are declared wards of the state or as independents because they don't have parents? Those students sign the loans on their own.

 

Most banks want some for of collator before handing over money to someone high risk. They're in to make money; not lose it. Federal government is a different story. The thought of students loans is stupid from a federal perspective; education should be free, and paid for by the tax payers, which it already is, but isn't accessible to everyone.
Avatar image for lamprey263
lamprey263

44655

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 10

User Lists: 0

#29 lamprey263
Member since 2006 • 44655 Posts
I imagine most students who attend college want high paying jobs when they get out, the college degree is how to accomplish that. However, for some leaving university it's still quite a challenge to even get a high paying job in today's job market, sometimes it's hard for some just to achieve any meaningful employment. It's not immoral of them because some people can't make their loan obligations, I'm sure they'd want to earn a living where they can start to pay back that money. If anything though, the current university system doesn't necessarily focus students to achieve degrees that are necessarily in demand, that's a huge problem. Maybe our education system needs a big overhaul, I say instead of federal loans for school they should give business some sort of subsidized incentive to educate new workers toward the particular trade their seeking employment for, to quickly and directly get them into the skilled jobs that are in demand.
Avatar image for deactivated-5acfa3a8bc51d
deactivated-5acfa3a8bc51d

7914

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 2

User Lists: 0

#30 deactivated-5acfa3a8bc51d
Member since 2005 • 7914 Posts
Adderall is a school supply a student loan can cover
Avatar image for surrealnumber5
surrealnumber5

23044

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 1

User Lists: 0

#31 surrealnumber5
Member since 2008 • 23044 Posts
uncle vinny charges less interest, but i guess there are more vinnys than there are federal governments.
Avatar image for way2funny
way2funny

4570

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 12

User Lists: 0

#32 way2funny
Member since 2003 • 4570 Posts

The fact that the U.S. government lends money to naive, fresh-out-of-high-school eighteen year olds is reckless and irresponsible. An eighteen year old is still a teenager, though legally recognized as an adult. Considering that society (i.e. teachers, school counselors, television, etc) tells young people that college is the only way to succeed, and that - to be specific - attending a highly accredited private university is ideal, then it's to be expected that a naive eighteen year old is going to accept federal student loan money (assuming that they can't afford it without the aid) to attend college. To them, signing the dotted line is a mere formality on the road to success. Little do they know, college is not for everyone, so some of them wind up flunking out or dropping out, with tons of debt. 

I believe that such people have no moral responsibility in regard to paying the loans back. To lend tens or even hundreds of thousands of dollars to a naive eighteen year old, fresh out of high school, is stupid and manipulative.

BluRayHiDef

The government DOES NOT lend money to students. They GUARENTEE the money. The difference? They contract out the work of lending the money to banks, and they do not themselves lend the money.

Avatar image for mattbbpl
mattbbpl

23050

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 0

User Lists: 0

#33 mattbbpl
Member since 2006 • 23050 Posts
I respectfully disagree. To accept your argument would imply that college age adults are not able to enter into contracts which carries with it a whole host of side effects that I'm sure they themselves would find unpalatable.
Avatar image for coolbeans90
coolbeans90

21305

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 0

User Lists: 0

#34 coolbeans90
Member since 2009 • 21305 Posts

Cute, OP.

Avatar image for LJS9502_basic
LJS9502_basic

178865

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 0

User Lists: 0

#36 LJS9502_basic
Member since 2003 • 178865 Posts
Your idea of morality sucks....then again I've seen some of your other ideas so....
Avatar image for Chris_Williams
Chris_Williams

14882

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 1

User Lists: 0

#37 Chris_Williams
Member since 2009 • 14882 Posts

dumb, it's just a part of life. Our government doesn't care if students leave college with thousands of dollars of debt. Where as other countries allow their students to go with no or very little cost.

Avatar image for YoshiYogurt
YoshiYogurt

6008

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 0

User Lists: 0

#38 YoshiYogurt
Member since 2010 • 6008 Posts
How else are we supposed to get money for college? I have maybe 10K in saving for it but that isn't going to cover the entire cost which will be $80,000 -$100,000.
Avatar image for BluRayHiDef
BluRayHiDef

10839

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 2

User Lists: 0

#39 BluRayHiDef
Member since 2009 • 10839 Posts

You are to a certain degree correct but the issue is a cultural one. Some people believe that in order to be a productive member of society you have to have a degree.

The issue with what you are saying is in order to be permanently weighed down you would have to have dropped out very late on during the course.

Leejjohno

One does not need to drop out very late in their major to incur large debt. A single year at a private university can cost $50,000, which is absurd.

Avatar image for LJS9502_basic
LJS9502_basic

178865

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 0

User Lists: 0

#40 LJS9502_basic
Member since 2003 • 178865 Posts

[QUOTE="Leejjohno"]

You are to a certain degree correct but the issue is a cultural one. Some people believe that in order to be a productive member of society you have to have a degree.

The issue with what you are saying is in order to be permanently weighed down you would have to have dropped out very late on during the course.

BluRayHiDef

One does not need to drop out very late in their major to incur large debt. A single year at a private university can cost $50,000, which is absurd.

Are you being forced to attend such a costly university? No. There are state schools, community colleges, tech schools, all of which cost less. If you incur too much debt....it's your fault.
Avatar image for lo_Pine
lo_Pine

4978

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 4

User Lists: 0

#41 lo_Pine
Member since 2012 • 4978 Posts

Yes, they do. There would be no other way for the student to go to college if they did not receive a loan.

Avatar image for BluRayHiDef
BluRayHiDef

10839

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 2

User Lists: 0

#42 BluRayHiDef
Member since 2009 • 10839 Posts

How else are we supposed to get money for college? I have maybe 10K in saving for it but that isn't going to cover the entire cost which will be $80,000 -$100,000.YoshiYogurt

If the government stopped interfering with the market for education, the Law of Demand would ensure that tuition costs would drop, since the demand for education is so high. Ironically, by flooding money into the educarion market, the government is causing the cost of education to increase, because educational institutions have an incentive to increase their prices, because they know the government will simply give more money to students to pay the increased prices.

Avatar image for BluRayHiDef
BluRayHiDef

10839

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 2

User Lists: 0

#43 BluRayHiDef
Member since 2009 • 10839 Posts

[QUOTE="BluRayHiDef"]

[QUOTE="Leejjohno"]

You are to a certain degree correct but the issue is a cultural one. Some people believe that in order to be a productive member of society you have to have a degree.

The issue with what you are saying is in order to be permanently weighed down you would have to have dropped out very late on during the course.

LJS9502_basic

One does not need to drop out very late in their major to incur large debt. A single year at a private university can cost $50,000, which is absurd.

Are you being forced to attend such a costly university? No. There are state schools, community colleges, tech schools, all of which cost less. If you incur too much debt....it's your fault.

People who graduate from expensive, private schools have a greater chance of being employed in the field of study they majored in. Hence, people are effectively forced to attend expensive, private universities. Be honest. Who do you think Lockheed Martin would choose to hire? Someone who attended MIT or someone who attended  some no-name community college?

Avatar image for lo_Pine
lo_Pine

4978

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 4

User Lists: 0

#44 lo_Pine
Member since 2012 • 4978 Posts

[QUOTE="YoshiYogurt"]How else are we supposed to get money for college? I have maybe 10K in saving for it but that isn't going to cover the entire cost which will be $80,000 -$100,000.BluRayHiDef

If the government stopped interfering with the market for education, the Law of Demand would ensure that tuition costs would drop, since the demand for education is so high. Ironically, by flooding money into the educarion market, the government is causing the cost of education to increase, because educational institutions have an incentive to increase their prices, because they know the government will simply give more money to students to pay the increased prices.

You seem to have a flawed view of how supply and demand works. When there is high demand an increase in supply lowers the price of the good.
Avatar image for coolbeans90
coolbeans90

21305

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 0

User Lists: 0

#45 coolbeans90
Member since 2009 • 21305 Posts

[QUOTE="LJS9502_basic"][QUOTE="BluRayHiDef"]

One does not need to drop out very late in their major to incur large debt. A single year at a private university can cost $50,000, which is absurd.

BluRayHiDef

Are you being forced to attend such a costly university? No. There are state schools, community colleges, tech schools, all of which cost less. If you incur too much debt....it's your fault.

People who graduate from expensive, private schools have a greater chance of being employed in the field of study they majored in. Hence, people are effectively forced to attend expensive, private universities. Be honest. Who do you think Lockheed Martin would choose to hire? Someone who attended MIT or someone who attended  some no-name community college?

Lockheed Martin recruits engineers from the state school I go to (and the in-state tuition runs under $10k annually), so . . . what the fvck are you talking about?

Avatar image for lo_Pine
lo_Pine

4978

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 4

User Lists: 0

#46 lo_Pine
Member since 2012 • 4978 Posts
[QUOTE="BluRayHiDef"]

[QUOTE="YoshiYogurt"]How else are we supposed to get money for college? I have maybe 10K in saving for it but that isn't going to cover the entire cost which will be $80,000 -$100,000.lo_Pine

If the government stopped interfering with the market for education, the Law of Demand would ensure that tuition costs would drop, since the demand for education is so high. Ironically, by flooding money into the educarion market, the government is causing the cost of education to increase, because educational institutions have an incentive to increase their prices, because they know the government will simply give more money to students to pay the increased prices.

You seem to have a flawed view of how supply and demand works. When there is high demand an increase in supply lowers the price of the good.

Just to clarify.
Avatar image for LJS9502_basic
LJS9502_basic

178865

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 0

User Lists: 0

#47 LJS9502_basic
Member since 2003 • 178865 Posts

[QUOTE="LJS9502_basic"][QUOTE="BluRayHiDef"]

One does not need to drop out very late in their major to incur large debt. A single year at a private university can cost $50,000, which is absurd.

BluRayHiDef

Are you being forced to attend such a costly university? No. There are state schools, community colleges, tech schools, all of which cost less. If you incur too much debt....it's your fault.

People who graduate from expensive, private schools have a greater chance of being employed in the field of study they majored in. Hence, people are effectively forced to attend expensive, private universities. Be honest. Who do you think Lockheed Martin would choose to hire? Someone who attended MIT or someone who attended  some no-name community college?

That's not true.
Avatar image for BluRayHiDef
BluRayHiDef

10839

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 2

User Lists: 0

#49 BluRayHiDef
Member since 2009 • 10839 Posts

[QUOTE="BluRayHiDef"]

[QUOTE="LJS9502_basic"] Are you being forced to attend such a costly university? No. There are state schools, community colleges, tech schools, all of which cost less. If you incur too much debt....it's your fault.coolbeans90

People who graduate from expensive, private schools have a greater chance of being employed in the field of study they majored in. Hence, people are effectively forced to attend expensive, private universities. Be honest. Who do you think Lockheed Martin would choose to hire? Someone who attended MIT or someone who attended  some no-name community college?

Lockheed Martin recruits engineers from the state school I go to (and the in-state tuition runs under $10k annually), so . . . what the fvck are you talking about?

Your state school is an anamaly. Also, for every engineer not chosen from your state school, a dozen are chosen from a private school.