Just tried Vudu. I remembered why streaming sucks.

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#1 Edited by Ezekiel43 (1320 posts) -

I just tested a few of my redeemed movies and TV shows on Vudu. Someone here told me that Vudu's HDX has good video quality. It does not. It takes a long while for the video to buffer to full HD, which only looks good some of the time. Even after I downloaded one of the files, in this case a Samurai Jack episode, which took a few minutes to complete, the quality was poor. I had to install the Vudu app, which required also installing Adobe Air and then downgrading to a previous version of Adobe Air. If I had played from the disc, I could have been watching within a minute. This was on my computer monitor. My connection isn't bad.

When I tried to run the streaming service from my computer through two HDMI repeaters and about 75 feet worth of cable, it told me this:

Oops! This title won't play in this quality on your display due to copyright restrictions. It can be played only if your output and display support HDCP.

I'm forced to watch in SD on the TV, even though Windows displays in 4K.

I was pretty disappointed that there are no audio options. My 5.1 surround movie was playing in stereo, and none of the buttons in the UI let me change that.

It's not really much cheaper than discs either, unless you're constantly binging, which most people including myself seldom do. The ad-free option of Hulu is 12 dollars a month. If all I want to watch on there is a season of Rick and Morty, then why don’t I just buy the show for 10 dollars instead? That way, I can also rewatch it for free if I feel like it, and I have it in the best quality. I could watch other shows on Hulu during that month to make up the cost, but the selection isn't that comprehensive, even if you combine it with a second subscription, like Netlix. They're especially poor options for older TV shows and movies, as well as foreign films. They just can't afford all those licenses. I think it's a shame that most of the "connected" people now won't even watch something if it's not on Netflix.

I also will never see my shows and movies suddenly disappear. I've seen titles disappear from Netflix. But my apartment has never been robbed.

Whenever I make threads about physical media, a few digital only users come in and start complaining about how gaudy boxes are and how inconvenient discs are. Some of it makes sense, but much of what they write just reads like lame excuses.

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#2 Posted by Byshop (19522 posts) -

@ezekiel43: HDCP error messages are not exclusive to streaming services.

"When I tried to run the streaming service from my computer through two HDMI repeaters and about 75 feet worth of cable..."

75 feet is a long way to try to extend an HDMI signal. I'm not saying it's not possible but two repeaters is definitely what's breaking HDCP. The issue here is the quality of your repeaters, likely. What are you using and with what kind of HDMI cable?

-Byshop

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#3 Edited by Ezekiel43 (1320 posts) -

@Byshop said:

@ezekiel43: HDCP error messages are not exclusive to streaming services.

"When I tried to run the streaming service from my computer through two HDMI repeaters and about 75 feet worth of cable..."

75 feet is a long way to try to extend an HDMI signal. I'm not saying it's not possible but two repeaters is definitely what's breaking HDCP. The issue here is the quality of your repeaters, likely. What are you using and with what kind of HDMI cable?

-Byshop

Actually, I made a mistake. It's 65 feet. Three AmazonBasics High-Speed HDMI cables 25 ft, 25 ft, 15 ft. Had to look up my orders to remember. The repeaters are a Tendak 4K@60HZ and a Monoprice Blackbird 4K Pro HDMI 2.0 4K@60Hz YUV 4:4:4.

Still, I find it funny that people are buying 3000 dollar OLED TVs to watch lousy streams. The quality is poor. Netlix looks much better than Hulu, but it still falls short of hard media. Don't remember if Netflix was better than Hulu with the audio options. Probably was better.

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#4 Posted by JustPlainLucas (79251 posts) -
@Byshop said:

@ezekiel43: HDCP error messages are not exclusive to streaming services.

"When I tried to run the streaming service from my computer through two HDMI repeaters and about 75 feet worth of cable..."

75 feet is a long way to try to extend an HDMI signal. I'm not saying it's not possible but two repeaters is definitely what's breaking HDCP. The issue here is the quality of your repeaters, likely. What are you using and with what kind of HDMI cable?

-Byshop

That meme is a train wreck.

Avatar image for uninspiredcup
#5 Posted by uninspiredcup (32255 posts) -

Don't notice much difference in video quality unless it's sub 720p.

But I mean, old. If you remember VHS tapes, we are light years ahead.

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#6 Posted by Byshop (19522 posts) -

@ezekiel43 said:

Actually, I made a mistake. It's 65 feet. Three AmazonBasics High-Speed HDMI cables 25 ft, 25 ft, 15 ft. Had to look up my orders to remember. The repeaters are a Tendak 4K@60HZ and a Monoprice Blackbird 4K Pro HDMI 2.0 4K@60Hz YUV 4:4:4.

Still, I find it funny that people are buying 3000 dollar OLED TVs to watch lousy streams. The quality is poor. Netlix looks much better than Hulu, but it still falls short of hard media. Don't remember if Netflix was better than Hulu with the audio options. Probably was better.

Yeah, I'm not surprised that you've having issues. Actually I'm surprised that you've able to get that working at all. The Monoprice Blackbird alone might be able to get you to where you need to be without the Tandak if you used a longer cable. One repeater could be fine but daisy chaining them is problematic. The Blackbird can extend a 4k signal by 25 meters (over 80 feet) but even then there's no guarantee that it'll work as that's really pushing the HDMI cable spec. The Amazon Basics cables technically should meet the spec, but personally I'd go with something heavier. Monoprice also carries bus-powered active 4k HDMI cables which is what I use throughout my basement.

I'm running some of these guys:

https://smile.amazon.com/gp/product/B019FN6D76/ref=oh_aui_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1

25 feet from computer to receiver, then another 25 feet from receiver to 4k projector as zone 1 and 4k tv as zone 2. Works like a charm about 99% of the time.

However, for the distance you're talking about I wouldn't recommend messing with any of the above. If you have to do a really long run then your best bet is an HDMI to Cat6 range extender. These boxes set the signal over a dedicated network cable rather than trying to extend HDMI that far. Cat6 is thinner, lighter, and better suited to carrying large amounts of digital information over longer distances. Once at the other end you have a receiver box that flips it back to HDMI and you're good to go. A good quality device like this might run you $100-200 for the pair, but they work great. You just need to make sure you're buying one that supports full 4k@60hz HDR 4:4:4 (18gbs). If you're curious, I have a co-worker who matrix wired his whole house recently. I can find out which one he used.

I don't know your setup or if this is a viable option for you but another thing you could do is just stick some sort of player device closer to your TV. A Roku is relatively cheap, supports 4k@60hz HDR, and has a player app for pretty much every major streaming service.

However, your original point is still valid. Streaming services will always have more compression than physical media because of internet bandwidth considerations. I wouldn't call it bad, though. Depends on the content and the provider. Also, make sure if you're playing on PC that you're using the service's native app or a browser that supports 4k for that service. Not all of them do.

-Byshop

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#7 Posted by DaVillain- (35548 posts) -

@JustPlainLucas said:
@Byshop said:

@ezekiel43: HDCP error messages are not exclusive to streaming services.

"When I tried to run the streaming service from my computer through two HDMI repeaters and about 75 feet worth of cable..."

75 feet is a long way to try to extend an HDMI signal. I'm not saying it's not possible but two repeaters is definitely what's breaking HDCP. The issue here is the quality of your repeaters, likely. What are you using and with what kind of HDMI cable?

-Byshop

That meme is a train wreck.

LOL I laugh so hard to this.

Avatar image for Byshop
#8 Posted by Byshop (19522 posts) -

@davillain-: When Adam Savage would look inside their latest experiment, find smoking crater, and proclaim in car mechanic voice "Well -there's- your problem" was one of my favorite recurring themes/gags on Mythbusters.

-Byshop

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#9 Posted by with_teeth26 (9429 posts) -

for some reason, I have a lot of issues with streams dropping in quality if I run them from my Desktop onto the TV.

If I use my phone and go through a chromecast it never drops from HD... no idea why. most smart TVs these days should have all the streaming apps built in which would probably work as well. I still have a 'stupid' TV so I don't have that option.

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#10 Edited by BlackBalls (1498 posts) -

That's odd. I have 20mb download and 5mb upload, because in my island that's as good as you're going to get, I'm able to watch Netflix shows at 4k without losing quality.

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#11 Posted by Ezekiel43 (1320 posts) -

@blackballs said:

That's odd. I have 20mb download and 5mb upload, because in my island that's as good as you're going to get, I'm able to watch Netflix shows at 4k without losing quality.

Like I said, Netflix has far better picture quality than Hulu. Still not as good as the disc, though. If you're only using Netflix, your selection is pretty limited.

Avatar image for ezekiel43
#12 Posted by Ezekiel43 (1320 posts) -

Just realized I kept saying Hulu in the opening post when I should have said Vudu. Sorry.

@Byshop said:
@ezekiel43 said:

Actually, I made a mistake. It's 65 feet. Three AmazonBasics High-Speed HDMI cables 25 ft, 25 ft, 15 ft. Had to look up my orders to remember. The repeaters are a Tendak 4K@60HZ and a Monoprice Blackbird 4K Pro HDMI 2.0 4K@60Hz YUV 4:4:4.

Still, I find it funny that people are buying 3000 dollar OLED TVs to watch lousy streams. The quality is poor. Netlix looks much better than Hulu, but it still falls short of hard media. Don't remember if Netflix was better than Hulu with the audio options. Probably was better.

Yeah, I'm not surprised that you've having issues. Actually I'm surprised that you've able to get that working at all. The Monoprice Blackbird alone might be able to get you to where you need to be without the Tandak if you used a longer cable. One repeater could be fine but daisy chaining them is problematic. The Blackbird can extend a 4k signal by 25 meters (over 80 feet) but even then there's no guarantee that it'll work as that's really pushing the HDMI cable spec. The Amazon Basics cables technically should meet the spec, but personally I'd go with something heavier. Monoprice also carries bus-powered active 4k HDMI cables which is what I use throughout my basement.

I'm running some of these guys:

https://smile.amazon.com/gp/product/B019FN6D76/ref=oh_aui_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1

25 feet from computer to receiver, then another 25 feet from receiver to 4k projector as zone 1 and 4k tv as zone 2. Works like a charm about 99% of the time.

However, for the distance you're talking about I wouldn't recommend messing with any of the above. If you have to do a really long run then your best bet is an HDMI to Cat6 range extender. These boxes set the signal over a dedicated network cable rather than trying to extend HDMI that far. Cat6 is thinner, lighter, and better suited to carrying large amounts of digital information over longer distances. Once at the other end you have a receiver box that flips it back to HDMI and you're good to go. A good quality device like this might run you $100-200 for the pair, but they work great. You just need to make sure you're buying one that supports full 4k@60hz HDR 4:4:4 (18gbs). If you're curious, I have a co-worker who matrix wired his whole house recently. I can find out which one he used.

I don't know your setup or if this is a viable option for you but another thing you could do is just stick some sort of player device closer to your TV. A Roku is relatively cheap, supports 4k@60hz HDR, and has a player app for pretty much every major streaming service.

However, your original point is still valid. Streaming services will always have more compression than physical media because of internet bandwidth considerations. I wouldn't call it bad, though. Depends on the content and the provider. Also, make sure if you're playing on PC that you're using the service's native app or a browser that supports 4k for that service. Not all of them do.

-Byshop

Nah, it's powerful enough. I wondered why there was no picture when using the computer with my TV's HDMI enhanced format option. I figured out the weak link today. It was the HDMI cable going from the receiver to the TV. The PC is connected to the receiver. When I took the last piece of the 65 foot cabling and plugged it right into the TV, I was finally able to play Battlefield 1 in 4K 50 fps HDR. It used to default to 30 fps. The HDR mode also looks much more exuberant now. I also just tried Vudu when connected to my PC and it no longer shows that message. I don't know if the signal will be powerful enough to also carry surround sound and not intermittently black out, but I'm guessing yes. I need to order another one of these Amazon Basic high speed HDMI cables to connect my TV to the receiver now, just a ten footer. They're much thicker than the cable that connects my receiver to the TV. I'm really hoping the receiver isn't gonna be another weak link. I don't wanna pull the thicker HDMI cables from the wall stables to find out. The specs for the Onkyo TX-NR575 say that it does support 4K 60 fps. My 4K Blu-ray player does transmit in 4K HDR through the receiver, but those movies are only 24 fps. I'm not planning to watch Vudu, considering how disappointing the quality is, or play games at this distance, so as of right now fixing this problem won't do me any good. I also prefer Netflix's disc rental service over regular Netflix, for the quality and infinitely bigger selection. They have DVDs and regular Blu-rays. For unavailable rentals, collections/boxsets and 4K content that I really want, I buy the disc. Some of the discs I own are region locked to Europe and Asia, which forces me to rip them into MKV files. That's part of the reason I have this ridiculously long HDMI connection. The signal seldom blacks out, and when it does it's only for like three seconds. The rips are from 480i to 1080p. Like I said, Windows does display in 4K 60 fps. I can at least look at some high res pictures from the sofa, watch some 4K porn and a few videos. So yeah, fixing this problem won't do me much good. But I still want to fix it.

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#13 Posted by BlackBalls (1498 posts) -

@ezekiel43 said:
@blackballs said:

That's odd. I have 20mb download and 5mb upload, because in my island that's as good as you're going to get, I'm able to watch Netflix shows at 4k without losing quality.

Like I said, Netflix has far better picture quality than Hulu. Still not as good as the disc, though. If you're only using Netflix, your selection is pretty limited.

I have Hulu, Prime and Netflix.

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#14 Posted by Ezekiel43 (1320 posts) -

@blackballs said:
@ezekiel43 said:
@blackballs said:

That's odd. I have 20mb download and 5mb upload, because in my island that's as good as you're going to get, I'm able to watch Netflix shows at 4k without losing quality.

Like I said, Netflix has far better picture quality than Hulu. Still not as good as the disc, though. If you're only using Netflix, your selection is pretty limited.

I have Hulu, Prime and Netflix.

Shit, I forgot to edit that post after realizing I should have said Vudu, not Hulu. I edited the OP. I don't actually know what Hulu's quality is like. Paying for multiple streaming services doesn't sound appealing, though. Do you binge on all three of them during the month or do two of the subscriptions mostly go to waste? Even if you add Hulu and Netlix together, they're not that comprehensive. I'm not gonna find everything I want to watch, which is why I find being a digital only user silly.

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#15 Posted by shellcase86 (4324 posts) -

@with_teeth26 said:

for some reason, I have a lot of issues with streams dropping in quality if I run them from my Desktop onto the TV.

If I use my phone and go through a chromecast it never drops from HD... no idea why. most smart TVs these days should have all the streaming apps built in which would probably work as well. I still have a 'stupid' TV so I don't have that option.

Speaking of Chromecst -- I have a similar experience....when it works. I've noticed that my Chromecasts connect less often. I don't know if Google is doing something to reduce their ability to stream content, but I've noticed an increase in the number of times I cannot connect to my Chromecast device.

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#16 Edited by Byshop (19522 posts) -

@ezekiel43 said:
@blackballs said:
@ezekiel43 said:
@blackballs said:

That's odd. I have 20mb download and 5mb upload, because in my island that's as good as you're going to get, I'm able to watch Netflix shows at 4k without losing quality.

Like I said, Netflix has far better picture quality than Hulu. Still not as good as the disc, though. If you're only using Netflix, your selection is pretty limited.

I have Hulu, Prime and Netflix.

Shit, I forgot to edit that post after realizing I should have said Vudu, not Hulu. I edited the OP. I don't actually know what Hulu's quality is like. Paying for multiple streaming services doesn't sound appealing, though. Do you binge on all three of them during the month or do two of the subscriptions mostly go to waste? Even if you add Hulu and Netlix together, they're not that comprehensive. I'm not gonna find everything I want to watch, which is why I find being a digital only user silly.

I don't know about Vudu, but Netflix and Hulu have some decent 4k content, but there will be slight differences to physical media from compression. Still, the Netflix original shows look great.

-Byshop

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#17 Posted by BlackBalls (1498 posts) -

@ezekiel43 said:
@blackballs said:
@ezekiel43 said:
@blackballs said:

That's odd. I have 20mb download and 5mb upload, because in my island that's as good as you're going to get, I'm able to watch Netflix shows at 4k without losing quality.

Like I said, Netflix has far better picture quality than Hulu. Still not as good as the disc, though. If you're only using Netflix, your selection is pretty limited.

I have Hulu, Prime and Netflix.

Shit, I forgot to edit that post after realizing I should have said Vudu, not Hulu. I edited the OP. I don't actually know what Hulu's quality is like. Paying for multiple streaming services doesn't sound appealing, though. Do you binge on all three of them during the month or do two of the subscriptions mostly go to waste? Even if you add Hulu and Netlix together, they're not that comprehensive. I'm not gonna find everything I want to watch, which is why I find being a digital only user silly.

Well, in the case of Prime, I already have prime for other things since I buy almost all my goodies on Amazon, so that's an extra bonus. Hulu is great for TV, where as Netflix as well. Honestly, I can't binge I don't have that much time but my family does so for everyone it has something good. My partner mainly watches spanish content and my brother (staying with me for a month) watches a lot of movies - I mainly watch tv. It's super worth it.

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#18 Posted by GTR12 (13442 posts) -

@ezekiel43: Thread-title still says Hulu.

Avatar image for ezekiel43
#19 Posted by Ezekiel43 (1320 posts) -

@GTR12 said:

@ezekiel43: Thread-title still says Hulu.

I didn't know you could edit thread titles.

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#20 Posted by mattbbpl (16894 posts) -

@Byshop said:

Yeah, I'm not surprised that you've having issues. Actually I'm surprised that you've able to get that working at all. The Monoprice Blackbird alone might be able to get you to where you need to be without the Tandak if you used a longer cable. One repeater could be fine but daisy chaining them is problematic. The Blackbird can extend a 4k signal by 25 meters (over 80 feet) but even then there's no guarantee that it'll work as that's really pushing the HDMI cable spec. The Amazon Basics cables technically should meet the spec, but personally I'd go with something heavier. Monoprice also carries bus-powered active 4k HDMI cables which is what I use throughout my basement.

I'm running some of these guys:

https://smile.amazon.com/gp/product/B019FN6D76/ref=oh_aui_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1

25 feet from computer to receiver, then another 25 feet from receiver to 4k projector as zone 1 and 4k tv as zone 2. Works like a charm about 99% of the time.

However, for the distance you're talking about I wouldn't recommend messing with any of the above. If you have to do a really long run then your best bet is an HDMI to Cat6 range extender. These boxes set the signal over a dedicated network cable rather than trying to extend HDMI that far. Cat6 is thinner, lighter, and better suited to carrying large amounts of digital information over longer distances. Once at the other end you have a receiver box that flips it back to HDMI and you're good to go. A good quality device like this might run you $100-200 for the pair, but they work great. You just need to make sure you're buying one that supports full 4k@60hz HDR 4:4:4 (18gbs). If you're curious, I have a co-worker who matrix wired his whole house recently. I can find out which one he used.

I don't know your setup or if this is a viable option for you but another thing you could do is just stick some sort of player device closer to your TV. A Roku is relatively cheap, supports 4k@60hz HDR, and has a player app for pretty much every major streaming service.

However, your original point is still valid. Streaming services will always have more compression than physical media because of internet bandwidth considerations. I wouldn't call it bad, though. Depends on the content and the provider. Also, make sure if you're playing on PC that you're using the service's native app or a browser that supports 4k for that service. Not all of them do.

-Byshop

If you find yourself running lengths of video cable like this, I'd recommend seeing if wiring for LAN (or a wireless repeater) might be a better option in your specific situation. Such runs are generally more flexible/useful and less prone to error.

Just something to consider for those who see themselves looking at this option in the future.

Avatar image for Byshop
#21 Posted by Byshop (19522 posts) -

@mattbbpl said:
@Byshop said:

Yeah, I'm not surprised that you've having issues. Actually I'm surprised that you've able to get that working at all. The Monoprice Blackbird alone might be able to get you to where you need to be without the Tandak if you used a longer cable. One repeater could be fine but daisy chaining them is problematic. The Blackbird can extend a 4k signal by 25 meters (over 80 feet) but even then there's no guarantee that it'll work as that's really pushing the HDMI cable spec. The Amazon Basics cables technically should meet the spec, but personally I'd go with something heavier. Monoprice also carries bus-powered active 4k HDMI cables which is what I use throughout my basement.

I'm running some of these guys:

https://smile.amazon.com/gp/product/B019FN6D76/ref=oh_aui_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1

25 feet from computer to receiver, then another 25 feet from receiver to 4k projector as zone 1 and 4k tv as zone 2. Works like a charm about 99% of the time.

However, for the distance you're talking about I wouldn't recommend messing with any of the above. If you have to do a really long run then your best bet is an HDMI to Cat6 range extender. These boxes set the signal over a dedicated network cable rather than trying to extend HDMI that far. Cat6 is thinner, lighter, and better suited to carrying large amounts of digital information over longer distances. Once at the other end you have a receiver box that flips it back to HDMI and you're good to go. A good quality device like this might run you $100-200 for the pair, but they work great. You just need to make sure you're buying one that supports full 4k@60hz HDR 4:4:4 (18gbs). If you're curious, I have a co-worker who matrix wired his whole house recently. I can find out which one he used.

I don't know your setup or if this is a viable option for you but another thing you could do is just stick some sort of player device closer to your TV. A Roku is relatively cheap, supports 4k@60hz HDR, and has a player app for pretty much every major streaming service.

However, your original point is still valid. Streaming services will always have more compression than physical media because of internet bandwidth considerations. I wouldn't call it bad, though. Depends on the content and the provider. Also, make sure if you're playing on PC that you're using the service's native app or a browser that supports 4k for that service. Not all of them do.

-Byshop

If you find yourself running lengths of video cable like this, I'd recommend seeing if wiring for LAN (or a wireless repeater) might be a better option in your specific situation. Such runs are generally more flexible/useful and less prone to error.

Just something to consider for those who see themselves looking at this option in the future.

Agreed. That's what I was suggesting here.

-Byshop

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#23 Posted by Byshop (19522 posts) -

@ezekiel43 said:
@mattbbpl said:

If you find yourself running lengths of video cable like this, I'd recommend seeing if wiring for LAN (or a wireless repeater) might be a better option in your specific situation. Such runs are generally more flexible/useful and less prone to error.

Just something to consider for those who see themselves looking at this option in the future.

Another two AmazonBasics high-speed HDMI cables arrived. One spare. I'm now running 65 feet from the PC to the receiver and another 10 feet from the receiver to the TV (ARC). It looks like HDCP isn't carried. Vudu still won't play above SD. But I'm able to play BF1 in 4K 60 Hz HDR. The PC signal no longer craps out when I enable the HDMI enhanced format. Good enough for me. I could always start streaming from the TV's apps again. But I'm gonna stick with discs and disc rentals for now, for the better quality and selection.

That should be fixable, but if you're good with how it's working then that's great. That's a particularly long run for HDMI without resorting to CAT5/6. Amazon Basics cables are decent, but if you run into any more issues I'd look at seeing what you can do with bus-powered active HDMI cables like the ones that Monoprice carries (which are also sold on Amazon). They aren't that much and they work great. My setup is a little bizarre as well and after some experimentation I was able to get it working really, really well. This is an older diagram/floor plan I made:

The above diagram is mostly accurate but I've made some changes and upgraded some hardware. The PC runs in my office in a three monitor setup, but it also extends to the main room of the basement as a fourth monitor plus VR setup for both Oculus and Vive. There's a multi-zone receiver in there that splits any input in the basement (including the PC) to any of the three display devices. All of the HDMI cables are Monoprice active cables. Each one is a 20-25 ft cable. It's all controlled by a Control4 system which uses touch screens and UHF universal remotes that work in/from any room to control any room. Everything works like a charm, up to and including running 4k HDR 60hz content to multiple rooms at the same time.

One question: What are you using to play Vudu on the PC? Is it a browser or a native app? Some streaming services work better in some browsers. IE and Edge are more tightly integrated regarding content protection, which is why they can't stream in VR apps. Chrome works with a lot of stuff but it's video playback performance is not great. Firefox works for some. On top of that, most of these services have some sort of native app you can use for playback, either a standard app or a Microsoft Windows Store native app. If whatever you're using isn't working you can try another playback method with the same hardware. You might get better results.

And lastly, I mentioned earlier that the "easy button" if you just want to watch streaming is to not run it from your computer at all. Use the long HDMI run like you are for playing games in the other room, but use something like a Roku to be able to play streaming service content in that room without having to rely on your long HDMI run.

-Byshop

Avatar image for ezekiel43
#24 Posted by Ezekiel43 (1320 posts) -

@Byshop said:
@ezekiel43 said:
@mattbbpl said:

If you find yourself running lengths of video cable like this, I'd recommend seeing if wiring for LAN (or a wireless repeater) might be a better option in your specific situation. Such runs are generally more flexible/useful and less prone to error.

Just something to consider for those who see themselves looking at this option in the future.

Another two AmazonBasics high-speed HDMI cables arrived. One spare. I'm now running 65 feet from the PC to the receiver and another 10 feet from the receiver to the TV (ARC). It looks like HDCP isn't carried. Vudu still won't play above SD. But I'm able to play BF1 in 4K 60 Hz HDR. The PC signal no longer craps out when I enable the HDMI enhanced format. Good enough for me. I could always start streaming from the TV's apps again. But I'm gonna stick with discs and disc rentals for now, for the better quality and selection.

That should be fixable, but if you're good with how it's working then that's great. That's a particularly long run for HDMI without resorting to CAT5/6. Amazon Basics cables are decent, but if you run into any more issues I'd look at seeing what you can do with bus-powered active HDMI cables like the ones that Monoprice carries (which are also sold on Amazon). They aren't that much and they work great. My setup is a little bizarre as well and after some experimentation I was able to get it working really, really well. This is an older diagram/floor plan I made:

The above diagram is mostly accurate but I've made some changes and upgraded some hardware. The PC runs in my office in a three monitor setup, but it also extends to the main room of the basement as a fourth monitor plus VR setup for both Oculus and Vive. There's a multi-zone receiver in there that splits any input in the basement (including the PC) to any of the three display devices. All of the HDMI cables are Monoprice active cables. Each one is a 20-25 ft cable. It's all controlled by a Control4 system which uses touch screens and UHF universal remotes that work in/from any room to control any room. Everything works like a charm, up to and including running 4k HDR 60hz content to multiple rooms at the same time.

One question: What are you using to play Vudu on the PC? Is it a browser or a native app? Some streaming services work better in some browsers. IE and Edge are more tightly integrated regarding content protection, which is why they can't stream in VR apps. Chrome works with a lot of stuff but it's video playback performance is not great. Firefox works for some. On top of that, most of these services have some sort of native app you can use for playback, either a standard app or a Microsoft Windows Store native app. If whatever you're using isn't working you can try another playback method with the same hardware. You might get better results.

And lastly, I mentioned earlier that the "easy button" if you just want to watch streaming is to not run it from your computer at all. Use the long HDMI run like you are for playing games in the other room, but use something like a Roku to be able to play streaming service content in that room without having to rely on your long HDMI run.

-Byshop

The results are not as nice as I originally thought, which is why I deleted the quoted post.

Dual screen setups seem really finicky, especially with the TV's HDMI enhanced format (4K HDR 60). A lot of the time, my PC won't connect to the TV between the receiver at all. It happens with and without enhanced format, but I feel like enhanced format is even worse. I doubt it's the distance; it's freaking Windows or the receiver. I haven't verified, but it seems like I have to have the receiver on before I even try switching to the second display (the TV) or they won't try to connect again until I restart the computer. It also seems that if the signal disconnects for any reason, half the time I need to restart the computer before they will connect again. It's annoying. I'm gonna try it for a while with enhanced format and without. I can play in 4K 60 without, but I would need it on if I also want to do HDR. Which I guess isn't an issue. This distance is too long for lag-free gameplay anyway. I can't think right now what else I might do on my PC with HDR. I really wish I had the bedroom that's behind the TV. Then I could be playing PC games in the living room. Controller games like Sekiro and DMC5, I mean. I prefer most games with a mouse and keyboard, which aren't ideal for coffee tables. They're too low. Then again, I spend a lot more time watching movies and TV shows these days.

I played Vudu in Firefox.

I think my USB setup is similar to yours. The dongle for the cheap wireless mouse and keyboard is plugged into a 35 foot USB repeater cable.

Something else I've been noticing about my theater system is that my HD 558 headphones will initially zap my head with static when I plug them into the receiver. I think the receiver has too much impedance even in headphone mode. Hopefully, it won't damage the components.