SNES Switch controller alternatives

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pillarrocks

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#1 pillarrocks
Member since 2005 • 1987 Posts

I been looking for a SNES controller for my Switch since I hate using the Joy-cons. I know 8Bit Duo sells a SNES controller for $40 but I recently saw Castlemania Games selling a Retro bit wired SNES controller for $20 and a wireless one for $30. Is 8Bit a better option when it comes to SNES wireless controllers? I read reviews on YouTube everyone who reviews it says it's the best controller to get compared to one that Nintendo sells through their online store for $30. I really want a controller with a good battery life and the analog sticks look cool though I don't want the controller to be small for my hands.

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xantufrog

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#2 xantufrog  Moderator  Online
Member since 2013 • 15293 Posts

I bought an Retrobit Genesis wireless controller for mine and it's fantastic. Everything I wanted, and it came with both a USB wireless receiver for Switch/PC/PS3/etc AND a wireless receiver for my original Genesis (so I can use it with that too). Assuming their SNES option has similar options I don't think you'll regret it.

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pillarrocks

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#3 pillarrocks
Member since 2005 • 1987 Posts

I got a Retro Bit Sega Saturn Bluetooth controller as well but haven't used it for my Switch yet. I think it would feel weird using a Saturn controller on SNES games but might like it. I ended up getting the Retro Bit wireless SNES controller since I had a $6 coupon.

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Eoten

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#4 Eoten
Member since 2020 • 2964 Posts

Probably late to the thread, but I have the 8bitdo Sn30 Pro+, the Bluetooth SNES controller made by Nintendo, an SNES classic controller, Retrobit Bluetooth Saturn controller (same hardware and firmware used in the genesis bluetooth controller) and I've tried the 8bitdo M30.

The official Nintendo SNES controller for Switch, and for the SNES mini are not that good IMO. The Switch version has the extra ZL and ZR which is great, but the rubber in them is too stiff, too thick, and it doesn't feel like an original NES controller. The SNES mini controller uses the exact same parts, and feels exactly the same.

The d-pad for the 8bitdo products is identical to the d-pad in the SNES. Parts are even interchangeable between 8bitdo and original SNES controller parts, so, if you want an authentic SNES feel, get an 8bitdo SN30 without the sticks. You could also buy an original SNES controller, refurbish, and connect with an adapter, or 8bitdo sells a PCB for $20 you can put inside an original SNES controller to convert it to Bluetooth.

As for Retrobit stuff, they make great controllers, I highly recommend their Sega stuff for general 2D gaming and retro gaming. I used mine so much I actually snapped a leg off the cross shaped piece underneath the d-pad though. I contacted Retrobit about the issue and they sent me a few replacement pieces in about a week with no charge. Great customer service at Retrobit. I also bought the Tribute64 N64 controller from them mostly for playing PC emulators, but it turns out it's compatible with the Switch as well and works great for Smash.

The 8bitdo M30 is another great retro style controller, but I had QC issues with the one I ordered and had to return it. And honestly, if I want something retro styled with six buttons, it's hard to pass up a real deal officially licensed Bluetooth Sega controller from Retrobit. It's actually an official Sega product unlike the M30 which is cool.

As for using the six button controllers for stuff that require four face buttons on the switch, the most comfortable remapping I've found so far is the top row buttons (XYZ) being mapped to ZL, X, XR, and the bottom row (ABC) being mapped to Y, B, A. When you picture this layout you realize it's essentially a Gamecube button layout, and it prioritizes the three main face buttons, as any Sega based control scheme should.