Can the Wii *technically* do 802.11n WiFi??

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#1 Posted by peestandingup (275 posts) -

So, I noticed that inside the Wii is a Broadcom wireless chip for doing wireless internet over 802.11g networks. Im pretty sure these chips can technically do 802.11n with a software update, just like they did with some Mac computers a few months ago.

 

Anyone heard anything about this?? I have a wireless N router & Mac with 802.11n, so Id like to have my network all N for speed.

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#2 Posted by mouthforbathory (2114 posts) -
Those Macs were built with WiFi adaptors made to do 802.11n, they didn't have the drivers yet, because at the time "n" wasn't an official standard yet, but it was built in because was going to become the standard.  The "officiality" just needed to be finished. Unless Broadcom built "n" into the Wii (which is unlikely), it can't do it. And besides, very few homes even max out a regular "g" or even "b" connection. Do you have an internet connection capable of 54 MiBits/Sec? Most likely not, as even home fiber optic connections can barely reach 30 MiBs.
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#3 Posted by Jaysonguy (39454 posts) -

You don't need anything faster then B for online gaming.

Last time I checked the Wii only has a B built in, either way it's not exactly a huge need for G or even N.

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#4 Posted by peestandingup (275 posts) -

I just thought I read that the Wii had the same Broadcom chip in them that the pre-N Macs had, so it could do N with just a software update.

 

No, my internet cant go that fast, BUT I have an all N network in my house with a wireless server that I put all my media files on (iTunes, iPhoto, etc), so whenever there is a G (the Wii) device on the network, it brings the speed down to G, so I dont get the speed with reading/writing files that N would provide. I have to keep a wireless G router in bridge mode just for the Wii because it cant see my N router.

 

Also, wireless N has FAR greater range. 

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#5 Posted by mouthforbathory (2114 posts) -
Well the point of N is too provide higher bandwidth from the WiFi device.  The higher the bandwidth the better when you have lots of devices connected, but it's more likely your internet will the be the initial bottleneck.
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#6 Posted by MiiforWii (1013 posts) -

You don't need anything faster then B for online gaming.

Last time I checked the Wii only has a B built in, either way it's not exactly a huge need for G or even N.

Jaysonguy

I think that "Online gaming" can use n if it wanted to, gaming can use a ton of bandwith... The question is, can "Wii Online Gaming" use anything over B? 

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#7 Posted by MiiforWii (1013 posts) -

I just thought I read that the Wii had the same Broadcom chip in them that the pre-N Macs had, so it could do N with just a software update.

 

No, my internet cant go that fast, BUT I have an all N network in my house with a wireless server that I put all my media files on (iTunes, iPhoto, etc), so whenever there is a G (the Wii) device on the network, it brings the speed down to G, so I dont get the speed with reading/writing files that N would provide. I have to keep a wireless G router in bridge mode just for the Wii because it cant see my N router.

 

Also, wireless N has FAR greater range.

peestandingup

I dont know if the Wii can "do" n, but its nice to see another Mac person on these forums... :) 

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#8 Posted by codezer0 (15898 posts) -

The Broadcom wireless chips in the Macs had coding to allow 802.11n to be made possible, but at the time, .11n was nowhere near ready for standardization and Apple didn't have an Airport Extreme or other router product that could communicate at this speed.

Now with the new AE and AppleTV, Apple had a reason to enable the .11n support for those Macs.

Only way the same thing could happen with the Wii is if in fact the WLAN chip in the Wii had .11n capabilities or the ability to flash it and enable this support. However, given the rather huge bulk order that Nintendo would have to do for the parts that make a Wii work, this is HIGHLY unlikely.

Given that the Wii does support up to WPA2 (IIRC), then that suggests to me it at least supports .11g. I don't think a Wii is going to be needing .11n support...  And if you did need faster speeds, there are ethernet adapters so that you could use a faster, wired connection.

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#9 Posted by peestandingup (275 posts) -

[QUOTE="peestandingup"]

I just thought I read that the Wii had the same Broadcom chip in them that the pre-N Macs had, so it could do N with just a software update.

 

No, my internet cant go that fast, BUT I have an all N network in my house with a wireless server that I put all my media files on (iTunes, iPhoto, etc), so whenever there is a G (the Wii) device on the network, it brings the speed down to G, so I dont get the speed with reading/writing files that N would provide. I have to keep a wireless G router in bridge mode just for the Wii because it cant see my N router.

 

Also, wireless N has FAR greater range.

MiiforWii

I dont know if the Wii can "do" n, but its nice to see another Mac person on these forums... :)

Right on! Hey, there are actually TONS of Mac users on here. Wii & Mac users are sorta similar & adhere to the "think different" attitude. Plus, Mac users are growing like crazy lately. Its like the 80s all over again. :-) Im gonna break out my original Macintosh to celebrate!

 

 

The Broadcom wireless chips in the Macs had coding to allow 802.11n to be made possible, but at the time, .11n was nowhere near ready for standardization and Apple didn't have an Airport Extreme or other router product that could communicate at this speed.

Now with the new AE and AppleTV, Apple had a reason to enable the .11n support for those Macs.

Only way the same thing could happen with the Wii is if in fact the WLAN chip in the Wii had .11n capabilities or the ability to flash it and enable this support. However, given the rather huge bulk order that Nintendo would have to do for the parts that make a Wii work, this is HIGHLY unlikely.

Given that the Wii does support up to WPA2 (IIRC), then that suggests to me it at least supports .11g. I don't think a Wii is going to be needing .11n support... And if you did need faster speeds, there are ethernet adapters so that you could use a faster, wired connection.

codezer0

Yeah, the ethernet adapter is probably the way I'll end up going.