Which open world games have the least distracting LOD system?

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Zuon

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#1 Zuon
Member since 2008 • 376 Posts

The process of swapping out high-poly models in your game world for low-poly ones further away from the camera is standard for most games today. However, even though there are plenty games out there that handle this transition relatively seamlessly, there are also numerous other games that handle it so poorly that you can literally see the higher quality assets suddenly fade/pop into existence, lessening the player's immersion.

So, my question is, out of all the large-scale/open world games you've played in your lifetime, which games have handled this LOD system the best, with the least noticeable distractions during gameplay? Age of the game does not matter, as long as the transition between low poly and high poly is nigh-unnoticeable.

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jahnee

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#2 jahnee
Member since 2005 • 4033 Posts

@Zuon:

RDR2, assassins creed Origins

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ulfrinn

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#3 ulfrinn
Member since 2019 • 158 Posts

There are many games that do it where it is unnoticeable. How do you pick a winner if you can't tell a difference?

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Yams1980

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#4 Yams1980
Member since 2006 • 3766 Posts

Probably most or maybe all isometric openworld games don't have this LOD problem since they can display everything on screen without view distance being much of a problem.

I find it really distracting if objects disappear or have no animations or fake animations if you get far away. Always bugged me in Saints Row 3 and 4 when you were flying up high and looked down at the city, you could see the cars disappear and then the lower quality and limited animated versions appear.

I also hate it when objects or bodies disappear, at least keep it in memory until I leave an area. I've played ancient games which will remember where dead bodies and broken or moved objects are, yet a lot of new ones decide to not even keep track of these things. Some can't even remember more than a few bullet holes until it decides to erase them. These things shouldn't disappear, its just simple x,y,z coordinates to keep track of and when a 3d game from the early 2000's can remember these details that had limits to memory, there is no excuse that new games cut so many corners.

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RSM-HQ

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#5 RSM-HQ
Member since 2009 • 8894 Posts

@Zuon: I think a lot of people are going on assumption here.

Would have been useful if you mentioned platform.

No bias from me but on console lod (level of detail) is still an extemely noticeable technique, used often. Because they focus on what your perception is concentrating with, which is ultimately your immediate surroundings. And the hardware can only take so much. I play my consoles often despite a P.C. but it's something that seemingly unavoidable. Especially in open world games.

With games even such as Horizon, Spider Man and Red Dead 2 using very noticeable lod. I think you can only really notice it less in linear games such as God of War (4); and even then I do notice it personally.

If this is at all an issue, and want games without it being as noticable? you'll need to jump onto the P.C. version (for multiplatform) and play around with the settings. In a lot of cases player-mods exist just for rendering everything as intended within your field-of-view. For anything past fifteen years most P.C. games shouldn't struggle even on a mid-lower P.C. but anything 2010 onward maybe a bit more demanding and cause frequent crashes and instability even with powerful components.

For openworlds I personally recommend modding Morrowind on P.C. for some good results. Overhaul 3.0 gives options to remove noticeable lod, even when using levitation.