Do you believe certain genres require more skill/intelligence/strategy?

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Lucky_Krystal

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#1 Lucky_Krystal
Member since 2011 • 1390 Posts

Yet another one of my topics sprung from the curious and interesting thoughts that gamers frequently post.

Quite a few people like to imply that certain genres take more or less skill/ intelligence/ and strategy. I see this argument come up in specific genres mostly. Some gamers will tell you that turn based RPGs take much more strategy and skill than action rpgs. Others will find puzzle games boring because they don't want to think that hard, they just want to kill stuff. And many will try to convince you that FPS take no skill or any kind of thinking at all. Some will even go as far as to say that most gamers lack the "intelligence" to play a game that last longer than 8 or so hours since games like Call of Duty are so popular now.

In my personal opinion (you can skip this if you want and just reply, this might be a little long)....

That's not true. In some senses. To put it simply, anyone with a normal healthy brain and the capacity to think could pick up a game, learn its mechanics and get good enough to beat the game on the easiest difficulty (should it be available). Anyone can learn the bare bones and trek through the game all the way through to the end(Edit: I realize its a stretch to say ANY game. there are exceptions to this rule). That includes ignorant trolls on the internet and young children. That may seem like an exaggeration, but remember, we are talking about learning the bare minimum, just enough to beat the game, not to play online, beat the hardest difficulty, or to beat the toughest bosses.

Video games are not rocket science. You are given certain rules to adhere by and mechanics to use. You learn these and you play through the game in order to beat it. It takes little to no extraneous thinking or hardcore strategizing to learn the bare minimum. However if we were talking about mastering the game, to where you could beat all the hardest bosses, destroy the best players out there, and beat the hardest difficulty, then that takes more time, effort, and skill than what it took to learn the basics of the game. But in each genre it takes different kinds of skills to master the game. The skills you learn in Call of Duty's Veteran mode won't help you in Portal 2. The skills you learn in Final Fantasy 13 will not help you beat Crushing mode in Uncharted 3. Beating Devil May Cry in Heaven or Hell mode will not help beat Baal in Disgaea. So its difficult to come to a conclusion of what takes more "skill" and "intelligence" because it largely depends on the player AND the game.

To me, saying something such as "RPGS take so much more strategy and skill than FPSs" is like saying "English takes so much more skill and intelligence than Math." The comparison makes little sense, as math and english recquire totally different skills. Also consider how different students struggle or excel in these two different subjects. Patience also has something to do with it, but that's a whole 'nother topic for another time...

Truth is, anyone with a properly functioning brain has the capacity to learn how to play any video game. And to imply that you are more intelligent solely becaue you play a certain genre of video games is pretty arrogant. And asinine.

So PeeGee, let me ask you: Do you think certain genres recquire more skill, intelligence, or strategy than others? If so, which ones? Do you think someone is ever more intelligent for playing or appreciating a certain type of game more? Do you see yourself as superior because you play a genre that you think takes much more skill and intelligence than any other genre, or look down on someone else for what they play ( I sometimes get this vibe from certain people when this topic is discussed)?

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Archangel3371

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#2 Archangel3371  Online
Member since 2004 • 29765 Posts
Oh yes most definitely I do although it mostly manifests itself when people are playing with or against other people.
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Smokescreened84

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#3 Smokescreened84
Member since 2005 • 2565 Posts
Considering that shooters are little more than 'run, gun, kill, kill, KILL!' with little intellect required then shooters are not exactly viable when it comes to games that test you intellectually. Turn based strategy games, RTS, puzzle and RPG's are more designed for those who can think beyond 'me have gun, me kill many, me pound chest'.
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EatShanna

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#4 EatShanna
Member since 2008 • 875 Posts
Yes, I believe strategy games take more strategy.
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contracts420

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#5 contracts420
Member since 2008 • 1956 Posts

In broad terms, yes I do think certain genres take more intelligence and strategy to play. A solid RTS game will confuse those that are used to simpler games. RPG's are nowhere near pick up and play compared to a shooter. But at the same time skill does not transfer from one genre to the next.

Here's an example. I am horrible at Demon's Souls, I absolutely suck at it. However players who have told me that I suck at video games because of this would also be the ones getting annihilated by me in Rainbow Six Vegas regardless of platform as I used to be in the top 100 players on PS3. Skills don't transfer, however I do think some genres take less thought.

I think there is a difference between a quick reflex shooter and a chess like match in an RTS game. But there are exceptions to this rule I am sure. Not every RTS will be as complex, and not every FPS will be so simple. But as I said, in broad terms the answer is yes.

I do not believe any gamer should be patronized for playing a different genre that may not be as complicated. We all enjoy different things and nobody should be looked down upon or bullied by others for it.

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dagreenfish

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#6 dagreenfish
Member since 2010 • 1818 Posts
Yes, I believe strategy games take more strategy. EatShanna
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Justforvisit

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#7 Justforvisit
Member since 2011 • 2660 Posts

Good Luck in trying to play Metal Gear Solid, Sim City or Command & Conquer as if it's Call of Duty :D

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XaosII

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#8 XaosII
Member since 2003 • 16705 Posts

Why dont you try playing a realistic flight simulator on a PC and tell me it takes the same amount of skill as Call of Duty?

A skill ceiling is something that game developers are very much aware of and will purposely raise it or lowering it based on their vision of a game. The idea that no skill ceiling exists is ridiculous.

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EatShanna

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#9 EatShanna
Member since 2008 • 875 Posts
Of course it exists. Obviously a game like CS has a higher ceiling than any of the latest CoD titles. Just like Starcraft/2 has a higher one than a game like EndWar or Act of War.
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Starshine_M2A2

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#10 Starshine_M2A2
Member since 2006 • 5185 Posts

I believe certain people are better at certain types of games. Whose to say one gamer is more intelligent than the other?

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cyborg100000

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#11 cyborg100000
Member since 2005 • 2905 Posts

A lot of games are easy to learn but take time to master, and there's the rare breed of games that require a good deal of thought along with time to become even decent at.

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GamerZem

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#12 GamerZem
Member since 2012 • 526 Posts

Absolutely. Most CoD players would get absolutely annhilated in Gears of War or Halo.

RTS games definitely require skill/strategy.

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Lucky_Krystal

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#13 Lucky_Krystal
Member since 2011 • 1390 Posts

Ok I think I mentioned strategy in my post and I take it back.

Shouldn't have included that, obviously a strategy game would take more strategy than an FPS or even some typical ho hum RPGs. However I hold on my argument that playing a certain genre may recquire that person to be more intelligent or skillful in most cases. In most the instances that I've seen the intelligence argument thrown about, it seem the poster just wanted to make themselves feel more superior to the "casual" gamers or fans of another genre that they hate.

As for skill, isn't it difficult to determine what takes more "skill" because each game recquires different skills that the player may or may not have? Its easy to say a strategy game takes more skill than an FPS, but what if we compare a puzzle game like Portal and a strategy rpg like Devil Survivor 2 or Valkyria Chronicles? Both recquire a fair amount of thinking, not just "run and gun" so could one say that one takes more skill than other? Again, doesn't it depend on the individual's strong points and the game's mechanics?

The turn based vs action rpg is a similar issue.

There are also always exceptions to the rule.

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contracts420

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#14 contracts420
Member since 2008 • 1956 Posts

Ok I think I mentioned strategy in my post and I take it back.

Shouldn't have included that, obviously a strategy game would take more strategy than an FPS or even some typical ho hum RPGs. However I hold on my argument that playing a certain genre may recquire that person to be more intelligent or skillful in most cases. In most the instances that I've seen the intelligence argument thrown about, it seem the poster just wanted to make themselves feel more superior to the "casual" gamers or fans of another genre that they hate.

As for skill, isn't it difficult to determine what takes more "skill" because each game recquires different skills that the player may or may not have? Its easy to say a strategy game takes more skill than an FPS, but what if we compare a puzzle game like Portal and a strategy rpg like Devil Survivor 2 or Valkyria Chronicles? Both recquire a fair amount of thinking, not just "run and gun" so could one say that one takes more skill than other? Again, doesn't it depend on the individual's strong points and the game's mechanics?

The turn based vs action rpg is a similar issue.

There are also always exceptions to the rule.

Lucky_Krystal

I would say certain genres take more intelligence and diligence on the players part. However skill is quite varied, anything from physical skills to mental skills or a combination of both. It's far more difficult to measure skill when comparing different genres and different players who are all unique. Especially when skills from one game and/or genre don't always transfer to the next.

So my answer is yes and yes. I think you can make the distinction that certain genres do require a more intelligent gamer. However skills depend on the user specifically I think.

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Ricardomz

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#15 Ricardomz
Member since 2012 • 2715 Posts

Sometimes it's not in the genres it's on the games.

For example: both Counter-Strike and Call of Duty are FPSs but CS requires much more skill.

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deactivated-57e5de5e137a4

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#16 deactivated-57e5de5e137a4
Member since 2004 • 12929 Posts
Yes, I'd say so. Twitchy action RPGs or Shooters obviously require more twitch reflex skill than turn-based RPGs or Military Sims like Arma. Puzzle and Adventure games require more logical puzzle solving ability than a typical FPS. I strongly disagree with your point about almost anyone can learn to play any game. Tell that to the people who could never beat Battle Toads or who are always at the bottom of the score board when playing a multiplayer shooter. I doubt every average gamer can beat a game like SpaceChem. As for asking which ones require a certain skill more than others, that's kinda impossible to say because it would depend on the perspective of a person who either did or didn't have that skill. I mean, you might not know you need a tool until you have to use it, but if it's one that you use all the time, like your molars, then you don't think about it.
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Lucky_Krystal

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#17 Lucky_Krystal
Member since 2011 • 1390 Posts

[QUOTE="Lucky_Krystal"]

Ok I think I mentioned strategy in my post and I take it back.

Shouldn't have included that, obviously a strategy game would take more strategy than an FPS or even some typical ho hum RPGs. However I hold on my argument that playing a certain genre may recquire that person to be more intelligent or skillful in most cases. In most the instances that I've seen the intelligence argument thrown about, it seem the poster just wanted to make themselves feel more superior to the "casual" gamers or fans of another genre that they hate.

As for skill, isn't it difficult to determine what takes more "skill" because each game recquires different skills that the player may or may not have? Its easy to say a strategy game takes more skill than an FPS, but what if we compare a puzzle game like Portal and a strategy rpg like Devil Survivor 2 or Valkyria Chronicles? Both recquire a fair amount of thinking, not just "run and gun" so could one say that one takes more skill than other? Again, doesn't it depend on the individual's strong points and the game's mechanics?

The turn based vs action rpg is a similar issue.

There are also always exceptions to the rule.

contracts420

I would say certain genres take more intelligence and diligence on the players part. However skill is quite varied, anything from physical skills to mental skills or a combination of both. It's far more difficult to measure skill when comparing different genres and different players who are all unique. Especially when skills from one game and/or genre don't always transfer to the next.

So my answer is yes and yes. I think you can make the distinction that certain genres do require a more intelligent gamer. However skills depend on the user specifically I think.

Well in the way you state it, I can kind of understand and agree. Its sounds a lot less condescending too.

The reason I was so against the "intelligence" argument was, like I said, because when I came across it, it mostly boiled down to someone saying "Ahurrdurr I'm smarter and better than you because I don't play FPSs." We can all see some games just have a steeper learning curve (its even noted in reviews) so I guess a person may have to learn and apply more concepts/mechanics possibly for a longer amount of time for certain genres. I still think a large part of the equation varies due to game mechanics and the individual however.

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o4SSASSINo

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#18 o4SSASSINo
Member since 2012 • 25 Posts
Good question, but you should have used "games" instead of "genres" Because like others have said, CS and CoD are both FPSs but CS has a way steeper learning curve, therefore requiring more skill. But I believe it all depends on what the developer had in mind as far as how difficult his/her game would be. So, yes, I think some games require more skill than others.
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#19 mav_destroyer
Member since 2005 • 3073 Posts
Yes, I think different games require different skills whether the skills in question are quick reflexes or complex problem solving depends on the game. You used a very good example about comparing English to Math. While all students at school study the same things there will always be students who excel at certain subjects and struggle in others. Same could be said about video games, some gamers have better thinking skills and prefer games that involve puzzles while other gamers have fast reflexes and prefer fast paced action games. I for one prefer to play RPGs or Strategy games, and I generally suck at FPS games. When I play FPS games most of the time I'm just decorating the environment with my virtual blood and body parts. On the other hand a friend of mine once gave me a strategy game (I think it was Total War or something similar) and literally told me his level of intelligence is not high enough for this game. Some games just have a steeper learning curve than others (not to be confused with game difficulty) To sum it up you could say every game requires a unique skill to play it, so yes some games require more of a certain skill than others. It could go something similar to this: RPG/Story games (Literature) Puzzle games (Logic/Math/Physics depending on the game) Action/FPS games (Quick reflexes) Real time and turn based strategy (Quick thinking)
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#20 El_Zo1212o
Member since 2009 • 6057 Posts
Skill is a funny thing. People develop skill by playing the games they play over and over again. But- I think some games take a more interesting kind of skill than others. For instance, Call of Duty or Halo are based on memorization and twitch aiming- you memorize the map layouts, the places where people tend to hide and the lesser used paths into those areas in order to get the drop on your enemy and then use your superior aiming ability to kill them before they can draw a bead on you. Now Assassin's Creed: Brotherhood takes a measure of memorization- keeping track of where the nearest escape routes are- but it relies more on cleverness and deception than simple twitch aiming skills. You have to out think your opponent. You can rely on your abilities to aid in your deception- using disguises, morphing groups of NPCs, or using decoys- or you can use them to smoke out your prey. You can use them to buff your offensive or defensive abilities, or you can do perfectly fine(even to the point of winning) without using any abilities at all. The player's innate grasp of the concept behind the multiplayer mode evens out the gap between a level 1 and a level 50 player.
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#21 Vari3ty
Member since 2009 • 11111 Posts

I really think skill is equivalent to how much time you're able to put into a game. If I play a multiplayer shooter all the time, and almost nothing else, I can get pretty good at it. However, if I only play it once in a while, I'm at a disadvantage to the other people who play it constantly, because they have had more practice.

MMOs are the definition of skill = time invested. Take EVE Online, for example. I've never played it, and if I decided to just jump into it today I'd have absolutely no idea what I was doing. After several months of gameplay and reading guides and discussing on forums, I could probably get a decent feel for the game, but it would take years for me to fully grasp all of the aspects of it.

In short, I believe almost anyone can become skillful at any game, provided they have the time required to become good at it.

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#22 WaterSphere
Member since 2012 • 203 Posts
I'm sure it does.
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Venom_Raptor

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#23 Venom_Raptor
Member since 2010 • 6959 Posts

Definitely. Most First-Person shooter games (while still able to present a challenge) do not require as much critical thought as tactical shooters or role-playing games.