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Feature Article

Xbox One Report Card 2017: Year In Review

Take a look back at the year in gaming for Microsoft.

Xbox One is now four years old, and its fourth year on the market felt both unsurprising and encouraging. It's difficult to know exactly how the system performed commercially because Microsoft has stopped sharing sales numbers, but Xbox boss Phil Spencer has made it clear that, for him and Microsoft, success is no longer gauged by Xbox One hardware sales. Microsoft has broadened its gaming aspirations, but in many ways, it's doubled down on its recent, user-friendly strategies with Xbox One, which has been promising.

With 2017 coming to a close, let's take a look back at the year that was for Xbox One.

Another Dose Of New Hardware, This Time With Meaningful Changes

Last year's Xbox One S was a solid hardware revision, providing a dramatic reduction in size, HDR support, and 4K Blu-ray playback capabilities. A small performance boost aside, however, it was effectively the same system that had launched back in 2013. The same can't be said of Xbox One X, which released worldwide in November.

Microsoft likes to tout that Xbox One X is the "world's most powerful console." As much as that sounds like a marketing line with little foundation in reality, it is true. Xbox One X is a powerhouse of a console, and one that's also incredibly well designed. That it manages to be so powerful but so quiet--and no bigger than an Xbox One S--is a feat of engineering.

Many of the games that have been updated to take advantage of the system's additional horsepower look stunning. Assassin's Creed Origins, Forza Motorsport 7, Wolfenstein II: The New Colossus, Gears of War 4, Hitman, Halo 5: Guardians, and others boast major improvements. Oftentimes, games even feature marked boosts to resolution and other areas over their PS4 Pro-enhanced counterparts.

But within those improvements, there has also been some degree of confusion. To its credit, Xbox One X does address one specific complaint about PS4 Pro: It allows you to filter your games to show only those with enhancement updates. However, it's unclear exactly what you're getting from any given game. Microsoft's website hosts a list of X-enhanced games along with indicators for those with HDR and 4K support, but is it native 4K, or a dynamic resolution? Do players have a choice between a mode favoring higher resolutions and one that offers steadier framerates and better effects? Finding out typically involves turning to third-party publications like Digital Foundry. It requires too much research on the part of Xbox One X owners to know what type of experience to expect from a game.

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That said, as was the case with PS4 Pro, it's hard to complain about the general approach of a mid-generation hardware refresh, because it's purely optional. There are always going to be those who want better graphics and performance without building a costly PC, while others will prefer to keep playing games on their existing console. The Xbox One X feels like an ideal compromise for this point in time: It provides those who care about playing improved versions of games an option for doing so, but without splitting up the multiplayer userbase or taking anything away from those who are happy with what they have. There is a degree of compromise to this, as games still have to work on Xbox One. At least so far, no developer has shown a willingness to provide meaningfully different gameplay features on X. We don't know of any games that will operate like, for instance, Shadow of Mordor, which offered the Nemesis system on current-gen consoles but an extremely pared-back version on Xbox 360 and PS3. But it's a compromise that is necessary to avoid leaving anyone behind, and it isn't preventing the X from offering some truly gorgeous games.

Among the most welcome aspects of how Xbox One X operates are the improvements it presents across the board. Even without a patch, Xbox One games benefit from anisotropic filtering, as well as--in many cases--shorter load times, framerates that more consistently reach their targets, and improvements to dynamic resolution scaling, which allow games to run at higher resolutions more often. The results vary from game to game, but they are often impressive--and this even extends to Xbox 360 and original Xbox games. And whatever the case, you're getting all of these benefits at no additional cost beyond that of the system itself.

Continued Welcome Improvements To The Xbox Ecosystem

Those improvements to your existing game library play into a broader strategy that Microsoft has been pushing over the past two years. Since the introduction of backwards compatibility, it's felt as if Microsoft decided to listen to what fans want and give it to them. While you might be missing out on some of the exclusives that PS4 owners have access to (more on that later), the company has made owning an Xbox One a more attractive proposition than ever.

That starts with the continuation of backwards compatibility. We've seen more than 145 more games added this year, bringing the total to over 450 games. This allows you to play games you already own on Xbox One, oftentimes with various technical improvements, even on non-Xbox One X systems. It's maybe the single best feature to distinguish the system from the PS4 (whose closest equivalent is the subscription-based PlayStation Now), and it continues to be available for free.

Microsoft has presented Xbox One owners with what feels like a respectful ecosystem that is committed to keeping your game library playable--and better than ever, if you have an Xbox One X.

Backwards compatibility has only improved this year with the added support of original Xbox games. While the selection is limited and will not expand at the same semi-regular pace as the Xbox 360 backwards compatible library, it is nevertheless nice to be able to play Ninja Gaiden Black and company on Xbox One.

2017 also saw Microsoft enter a new space with Xbox Game Pass. For a flat fee, subscribers can play full versions of games from a library with more than 100 games. But unlike Netflix or PlayStation Now, these game are downloaded, rather than streamed. That avoids any potential latency issues, though large download sizes for some games mean slow connection speeds remain a problem.

Game Pass certainly provides value for some--$10/£8/AU$11 per month isn't terribly unreasonable for someone on a tight budget who doesn't care about owning games long-term. However, it still feels somewhat incomplete. Microsoft has spoken about the potential it has to support original game development, much in the same way that Netflix has its own original programming, but six months in, that's something we have yet to see bear fruit. ReCore's Definitive Edition was available right at launch on Game Pass, but that was an update to a year-old game. Whether the service ends up leading to the creation of new games remains to be seen.

No Caption Provided

Elsewhere, Microsoft has provided more Xbox Play Anywhere games, providing a great incentive to pick up digital copies of select games, which provide access on both Xbox One and Windows 10 PCs at no additional cost. And the company continues to pursue cross-play support. While Sony has refused to open the gates of PSN, Nintendo has acquiesced, allowing Xbox One and Switch owners to play games like Rocket League and Minecraft together. That's good news for everyone involved.

Frequent System Updates--And Finally Making Some Progress

The layout of the Xbox One's menus and dashboard have been a source of complaints since launch. Providing intuitive access to so many features is no easy task, and this has remained a work-in-progress for the past four years. As with Xbox 360, Microsoft has not been shy about overhauling the Xbox One dashboard. 2017 was the best example of that yet, as we saw not one but two major updates to the layout of the dashboard and Guide.

The first of these came in March. It dedicated far less space to the active game or app and provided shortcuts for options related to it, such as its game hub. It also finally made the Guide accessible with a single button press--something that had previously required two. The Guide itself was refined to provide quick access to Game DVR and other functionality. Other additions included an on-screen Achievement tracker, Mixer integration (known at the time as Beam), and the co-pilot accessibility feature.

Incredibly, just over four months later, Microsoft revealed another redesign. Speed and customization were touted as two of the key goals. Aesthetically, it looked nearly identical to the March update, but the main Home screen was changed completely. It now consisted of "content blocks," each of which is dedicated to an item of your choosing, such as a specific game. The Guide (still brought up with one press of the Xbox button) was reoriented to have a horizontal layout. The Fall update officially launched in October.

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Xbox One's menus remain complex and intimidating, particularly for newcomers. Introducing such frequent shake-ups leads to confusion; just as you become accustomed to one setup, things are suddenly much different. As you'd expect, opinions vary about any such change, though the Fall update's Guide has at least surfaced frequently used features in an intelligent way. Microsoft has said that "small adjustments" are more likely than "big changes" in the future, which may be wise, though there is still work to be done.

Some Quality Games, But The Exclusives Gap Feels Bigger Than Ever

Xbox One is, ultimately, a machine meant to play games. And indeed, there were tons of great games to play throughout 2017. Microsoft certainly argues as much, but a problem arises when looking at exclusives on Xbox One versus PS4. Sony had a banner year, with Horizon: Zero Dawn, Yakuza 0, Uncharted: The Lost Legacy, Hellblade, Nioh, and Nier: Automata as its console exclusives. Furthermore, in many cases, third-party games were undeniably better on PS4, whether that was due to hardware (Xbox One lacks VR support to make Resident Evil 7's VR mode playable) or value considerations (Sony paying for timed-exclusive content in games like Destiny 2).

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Xbox One owners do have a lot to play, however. Between the exclusives that were released and the numerous third-party games on the market, picking up an Xbox One in 2017 would not leave you without worthwhile games. (The frequent addition of new backwards-compatible games doesn't hurt, either.) And if you pick up an Xbox One X, you're now even getting the best version of these third-party games, with the exception of those with PS4-exclusive content.

Xbox One was not completely devoid of exclusives this year. Forza Motorsport 7 and Cuphead are both terrific, and PUBG's early access release is likely to be enormous, if the game's performance on PC (and that of Fortnite's Battle Royale update) are any indication. But the gulf in exclusives this year has felt particularly huge, no doubt due to the cancellation of Scalebound and delays of Crackdown 3 and Sea of Thieves (both of which were delayed in 2016, too). Whether it made the right calls or not, the end result was a year that was much stronger for the competition in terms of exclusive games.

Other Matters, In Brief

  • It was another good, if unspectacular, year for Games With Gold. There were few newly released games (Slime Rancher being a notable exception), but we still got a total of 48 games that are playable on Xbox One, all of which stand to receive at least some benefits when played on Xbox One X.
  • Xbox One remained the only console with access to EA Access. This remains a nice service for $30 per year, even offering recent games like Battlefield 1, Titanfall 2, and Mass Effect: Andromeda.
  • 500 GB remains effectively the standard hard drive size for Xbox One. That felt small at launch in 2013, and the situation is only worse now. With games like Gears of War 4 and Halo 5: Guardians ballooning in size (the two combine to take up about 200 GB) and less than 400 GB being usable, it's possible to fill the drive with only a few games installed. Xbox One's external hard drive support is great, but the system could use more storage space right out of the box. This problem extends to Xbox One X, despite the 1 TB hard drive, due to the size of 4K assets.
  • Kinect feels well and truly dead at the end of 2017; like the Xbox One S, Xbox One X lacks a port for the sensor, necessitating the use of a dongle. With little support and its voice commands looking more outclassed than ever by devices like the Amazon Echo, that's for the best.

Verdict

Even in lieu of a headlining game like a Halo FPS, this still has in many ways been a positive year for Xbox. It's unlikely to ever catch PS4 in terms of sales, and it remains to be seen if Microsoft can begin to match PS4's exclusive output. But after it started out this generation by turning off a huge number of people with the Xbox One's initial unveiling, Microsoft has continued to make amends by focusing on fan-friendly initiatives like backwards compatibility, Play Anywhere, and cross-play.

Microsoft says it has unannounced games coming, but there's no telling when; exclusives may remain an issue for the foreseeable future. There's no getting around that, but Microsoft has presented Xbox One owners with what feels like a respectful ecosystem that is committed to keeping your game library playable--and better than ever, if you have an Xbox One X. That may not be as flashy as a long list of exclusives, but it's a compelling argument to consider investing in Xbox.

The GoodThe Bad
  • Xbox One X provides great upgrades, especially on 4K HDR TVs
  • Original Xbox backwards compatibility
  • Continued support of cross-play and Play Anywhere
  • Exclusive game lineup thoroughly outclassed by PS4 and Switch
  • Xbox One's UI is still in need of improvement
Got a news tip or want to contact us directly? Email news@gamespot.com

mrblondex

Chris Pereira

Chris Pereira is GameSpot's engagement editor. He likes Twin Peaks, The X-Files (before it was bad), and serial commas.

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371 Comments  RefreshSorted By 
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Avatar image for cboy95
Cboy95

I wish Square Enix would port Nier Automata already!

Avatar image for PSYCHOV3N0M
PSYCHOV3N0M

"Microsoft has presented Xbox One owners with what feels like a respectful ecosystem that is committed to keeping your OLD game library playable--and better than ever, if you have an Xbox One X."

*FIXED*

Avatar image for cboy95
Cboy95

We should get more JRPGs for the system. Like Nier Automata.

Petition: Port Nier Automata to Xbox One

Avatar image for wamadden4
WAMadden4

@cboy95: JRPGs are for weebs... as well as pretty much all RPGs.... BORING!!!

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Creepywelps

@cboy95: Jrpgs don't go to Xbox because Xbox gamers dont support them.

Avatar image for bubba_666
Bubba_666

Xbox One is a great piece of technology, but without any REAL exclusives to take advantage of it's power, and few in sight. It's hard to recommend it over the standard Xbox, or the S model. Just like the Pro isn't worth a dime, when you already own a PS4 Slim (or stock model). I prefer PS4 because of all the content you can't' get anywhere else. And I've done a direct comparison of games like Rise Of the TR, Destiny 2, Assassins Creed Origins etc. And found the difference in the PS4 Slim, and the X is very marginal. Just slightly sharper texture on some games. I actually found AC Origins to look superior in many ways on the regular PS4. Lighting, color, clarity, even framerates were more solid. And this was all done on a Sony 4K TV, with the option for HDR. The only games that were like WOW on the X were Gears 4, Gears 3, Forza 7(meh game), Halo 5 and some old 360 games. Thats it. Other than that, it's still just not worth it. Because the difference(s) are far from NIGHT and DAY. Now next gen, we'll see how that goes. I think the PS5 will hit stores in 2019, with The Last Of Us 2, and Death Stranding releasing right along side it. In that case I think Sony will set a new record for sales and gaming standards. Just my opinion.

PS Look at Trump, yeah he's the most powerful man in America...does it make him the best? Hmm

Avatar image for Thanatos2k
Thanatos2k

D+. Xbox One X while too expensive is technically sound machine, but games are being held back by having to run on regular Xbox One. Game library is a flaming wreck, crippling lack of exclusives destroy any reason to own the platform.

Avatar image for uncle5555
uncle5555

@Thanatos2k: Hmmm....

"Xbox One X while too expensive is technically sound machine, but games are being held back by having to run on regular Xbox One X"

One of these things is EXACTLY like the other. ;-P

Avatar image for Thanatos2k
Thanatos2k

@uncle5555: Yeah yeah, typo. I originally wrote Xbox One and X One S, then deleted a few words because I thought it was redundant, and forgot to remove the last X.

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TiringPillow

I love the X and knowing that I have the best console version available. I wouldn't trade that for anything. I mean, why would you? Who wouldn't want the best? For those who don't care as much about having a substandard product the PS4 Pro is perfect for them. Everybody wins!! The gaming golden age for sure.

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Random_Matt

Sub 30FPS box for the majority of games, super powerful.

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KhanWasHere

@Random_Matt: A LOT of games are still 60fps though. Not saying Xbox One X is the definitive gaming device but there are tons of 60fps games running at near 4k and that's very impressive for the specs.

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darkelf83

So why does MS get a pass for not having VR? You didn't even mention that they seem to not have plans as yet to support it either. Sony gets ripped for not having cross-play in 2 titles and MS gets a pass for not accepting Square's offer to bring FFXIV to Xbox (which would support cross-play).

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xhawk27

@darkelf83: MS is making sure they don't get burn again like they did on Kinect. Second VR needs to be wirlesss to be real revloutionary. Until the technolgy can support this they are taking their time. Square might be making too many high demands to MS to allow FFXIV on XBL.

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solid_snake1461

I just love this season of the year. It’s winter and yet the rage of people going at each other's throat makes it almost feel like the peak of the summer heat.

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Plus_1

@solid_snake1461: tru spit. 😂💯

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Bubba_666

Yeah most people who own an Xbox One S are perfectly fine and satisfied with it. The x basically for people who want to see more pixels here and there. The pro was really no different and not even necessary to have. But since the Xbox one was always ridiculed for being weaker it's nice that people have the option for the X. I'm fine with the PS4 Slim and the s. Both hooked up to 4K TV look amazing. Also Sony are just always going to have the better exclusives only for their console. And that's really what most people are waiting on. Myself included. Also I've seen enhanced games on the X especially ones that aren't 4K that don't look any better then the stock PS4 at 1080p. So for me it's definitely not worth the price for but good for the people who want to pay it.

Avatar image for Daelusca
Daelusca

@bubba_666: Again, you ponies need to qualify those statements with PS will always have the best anime Japanese indies......with that qualification I 100% agree with you.....and X will always have the best multiplayer games (including PUBG) and the best non Japanese single player games....to each their own and all that.

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dlCHIEF58

@bubba_666: Triggered.

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Bubba_666

@plus_1: Whatever you say young lad. ;o)

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PCGameboy

The Xbox X has been very disappointing with many games that have been out. Most games not native 4k, but dynamic 4k with dips below, and most games being 30fps with some also dipping below even that like AC Origins, Fallout 4, Skyrim, FF15, Quantum break, and more. Even some of the games that have an unlocked fps dips below 60fps, and are not at all consistent. They should of worried about consistent framerate at an acceptable resolution like 1440p or something. The focus on 4K is making the Xbox X fall short on both 4K resolution, and a stable 60fps in most games.

Avatar image for willnulife
willnulife

@pcgameboy: Maybe disappointing to you, but to other folks that can see the real difference, not at all. Developers make it a point to optimize games on console for an "as smooth as possible" experience. The fps range on a console game is much narrower and more tightly controlled than on a PC.

If it's locked at 30, you won't see much variance up or down. Locked at 60, same thing. But on PC? People brag about how they hit 70 fps, or this or that, when in reality the game escalates up or down by over 20, 30, or 40 fps. That's not an experience developers want to give to their mainstream audience on a console.

The reality is, unless you have a GTX 1080 Ti, you're just not going to see a real noticeable improvement over the X. Sure, you can turn down PC settings to 1440p and get 100+ fps, but then you'll get 40-60+ fps variance in your game.

Avatar image for pcgameboy
PCGameboy

@willnulife: What are you talking about? Console games framerates are all over the place in many games.. Go look at Digital Foundry, or VGTech videos, and there are framerates dipping below 30fps in some games like AC Origins, FF15, Fallout 4, and more. On PC peoples framerates depending on their build can be up to 144fps, and rarely dipping below 100. Or they can lock their fps at 60 if they wanted to. Far smoother experience than most games on consoles, including the Xbox X. \

The framerates are a night and day difference, and i won't be seeing any drops down to the 40s if i am playing above 100fps, or locked framerate. Get over yourself dude. lol The Xbox X version of many games do not run anywhere near as smoother as PC with higher fps than 30. The Xbox X power is nowhere near the 1080ti, or the 1080. Its barely as powerful as the 1070, even less when considering the CPU the Xbox X has. DOn't need a 1080ti to play tons of games at 1440p 60fps+.

Avatar image for willnulife
willnulife

@pcgameboy: "The Xbox X power is nowhere near the 1080ti, or the 1080. Its barely as powerful as the 1070, even less when considering the CPU the Xbox X has."

A good PC build with a GTX 1070 will cost around $1200. A 1080 isn't much better than a 1070. A 1080 Ti is a little jump, but now you're talking $1500+ for a solid build.

At $500, that shows the value of the X. It's kind of funny when you say you're disappointed in a box that costs $500 because it can't perform better than a $1300 PC.

"Get over yourself dude."

lol. This has nothing to do with me. Not sure what you were getting at with that comment.

You just verified what I already posted. "can be up to 144fps, and rarely dipping below 100." That's a huge variance in framerate. Going from 144 down to below 100 is a large difference. Devs don't like that. This is why they lock framerates. If the X was unlocked, it would go well above 30 at times, and still dip occasionally at times.

I play games on my PC. I might be playing at 60 fps, and then for a certain area the game lingers in the 30s and 40s. It judders. It's not good.

Besides, you might satisfied with 1440p on a small monitor. With the image quality of TVs these days, I prefer 2160p. For cinematic games, 30 fps is fine. I'd rather have the image quality, and when given the choice, Digital Foundry agrees.

Avatar image for wiggs2k
WIGGS2K

@willnulife: right, why are we comparing the PC against the One X, again. We all know for a fact that it can not compete with a good PC. Like you said earlier $500 is better than paying $1300+. The good part is that consoles last way longer than PCs, meaning i dont have to worry about my video card not being able to play a certain game. Now i have to spend another $200+ for a new video card.

Now if the PS4 is so far behind the X1X in performance, i can see the comparisons with the PC, but the PC will always have better everything, but with a hefty pricetag.

MS vs Sony, who cares. I dont. I prefer MS X1X. Sonys PS controllers are too small for my hands and i love the underdogs.

Plus, for the Sony ppl. How is it that MS can come out with at least 2 Forzas a year, but it seems like Sony takes forever to put out a new GT game?

Avatar image for pcgameboy
PCGameboy

@willnulife: That is bs. lol My PC is GTX 1080 and I7 7700K build and cost about 1.3k for me to make, someone only needs a GTX 1070 and a mid range CPU to be better than the Xbox X.. The 1080 is about 30% better than 1070, and the 1080ti is about 40% faster than the 1080... Add that up and you are looking at over 50% better performance with a 1080ti compared to a 1070. (link 1080 vs 1080ti http://gpu.userbenchmark.com/Compare/Nvidia-GTX-1080-Ti-vs-Nvidia-GTX-1080/3918vs3603)

Please dude you have no idea what you are talking about. a $800 PC will outperform the Xbox X. PCWorld has already don PCs to try matching the Xbox X power, and $780 i believe was the closest they have come. (Though prices will drop when VOlta comes out.) Uh, no you completely ignored the fact that i said you can LOCK the framerate if you don't want framerate changing, but a its barely noticable when dipping 144to120fps, its so damn smooth that it STILL destroys a locked 30fps which is still slow, and not smooth at all. Thats ignoring the face that there are games on the Xbox X that are not locked at 30fps, and dip under that.

IF your PC dips under 60fps then that is your issue, my PC on every game i play NEVER dips under 60fps.. I can change settings if i have to to keep a locked 60, or higher. You clearly either don't own a PC, or you are so biased, that you would make your PC look bad just to make the overrated Xbox X sound better. lol

Uh no there is no "cinematic games", they are games not movies, there is input, and everything that goes into a game to make it smooth, and 60fps is always smoother. 4K doesn't mean anything when it runs like as*. Most people would prefer a higher framerate than higher resolution. Go look at Digital Foundry video on Fallout 4, and see all the pissed off Xbox gamers in the comments because its at 30fps, with some dips. You can make up whatever excuse you want, and like whatever platform you want, but Xbox X falls VERY short to even a GTX 1070 experience, because of all the compromises with the CPU, and the closed ecosystem of developers not giving players much options on consoles.

Avatar image for xhawk27
xhawk27

@pcgameboy: Look a butthurt X hater. Hahahahah shut it hater. For $500 the X is a steal for the power it has. "So Deal with it"!

Avatar image for pcgameboy
PCGameboy

@xhawk27: Steal? Most games not running native 4K, and mostly at 30fps? I mean if you want tons of compromises then sure its a "steal". Even games like Skyrim run at 30fps. No thanks. Glad you enjoy it though.

Avatar image for willnulife
willnulife

@pcgameboy:

"Please dude you have no idea what you are talking about."

Oh look, another PC guy that thinks he knows all about it because he owns one.

You are the one that stated this, "Its barely as powerful as the 1070," and now you're changing your story? lol.

Building a PC that approximates the specs of the X never works. The X will outperform it. It turns out that the 1070 averages 55 fps in 4k on Forza 7. Titanfall 2 averages 44 fps in 4k, whereas X averages around 1800p from 2160p. In those two games, the X performs better, so the 1070 is not too far off the mark.

Don't spout percentages based off specs. What really matters is actual performance. In CoD: WW2, the 1080 gives you 8 more fps than the 1070. There's your "30%" in action.

"Uh, no you completely ignored the fact that i said you can LOCK the framerate if you don't want framerate changing,"

That's great, but nobody does it when they brag about their FPS.

"Uh no there is no "cinematic games""

Oh okay, genius.

You need to go back to your first claim that the X is around the 1070 in performance. That's far more accurate. But I guess if you blew $1300 on your 1080 setup, I can see why you're upset with the X at $500.

Avatar image for pcgameboy
PCGameboy

@willnulife: I never changed my claim that its near the 1070, nto once. Also there are tons of ebnchamrks with the 1080 having more than 10-30fps more than the 1070. Depends on how optmized the game is, but the 1080 has far more than just 8fps more than the 1070. It is in FACT 30% better than the 1070. There si video testing the 1070 vs 1080, and in the majority of games its more than 10fps more than the 1070, which makes a big difference when trying to stay at a stable framerate, and reaching 60fps. Many are more than 10fps difference. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ybQ-34Grr5k

This is only a stock 1070 vs a 1080, the 1080 can be overclocked to do even better than the 1070, something the Xbox X cannot do. Also people still can locke their fps, whether they actually do it or not is irrelevant, fact is, 120-144fps is still better than a locked 30fps.

Why would i be upset at the Xbox X when it can't hit 60fps in the majority of games, even at 1080p it can't keep a solid 60fps without dips in many games. Gears 4 performance mode it still dips below 60fps. Who would be upset at that? lol Fallout 4, and Skyrim STILL run at 30fps on the Xbox X... Noooo thank you. I will play ALL my games at 60fps+at 1440p Ultra. Much better, and more consistent experience than fake 4K 30fps with dips.