Trailer For Wes Anderson's Isle Of Dogs Is A Love Letter To Classic Japanese Cinema

It's Wes Anderson meets Akira Kurosawa meets Homeward Bound.

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Now Playing: Isle Of Dogs - Movie Trailer

Director Wes Anderson is known for his quirky style of filmmaking, but the trailer for his upcoming film, Isle of Dogs, looks like the filmmaker's most peculiar movie to date.

The film, which comes to theaters on March 23, 2018, takes place in Japan in the near future, where an overpopulation of canines--along with an outbreak of canine flu--forces the mayor of Megasaki to sign a decree, sending all infected pups to a island made of trash. A 12-year-old boy goes on an adventure to the garbage isle to find his dog Spots and is accompanied by five hounds.

Anderson said (via Collider) that Isle of Dogs is influenced by the work of iconic Japanese director Akira Kurosawa (Rashomon, Seven Samurai). Considering Kurosawa's work, which are not films you'd take the whole family to see, don't expect Isle of Dogs to get a PG rating, like Fantastic Mr. Fox. The trailer takes viewers on an epic, uphill journey where strangers form unique bonds, which is reminiscent of Kurosawa's work.

In addition to the typical actors we see in Anderson's films--like Bill Murray, Edward Norton, Tilda Swinton, and Jeff Goldblum--Scarlett Johansson and Bryan Cranston will provide their voices to the film, along with a slew of other familiar names, which can be seen at the end of the trailer above.

The film has a unique animation style that Anderson used in his 2009 film Fantastic Mr. Fox: stop-motion animation, which isn't used as prevalently as it was in the past. "I really liked these TV Christmas specials in America," Anderson explained. "I always liked the creatures in the Harryhausen-type films, but really these American Christmas specials were probably the thing that really made me first want to do it."

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