Sony struggling to attract third-party support for Vita - Report

Sony Computer Entertainment worldwide studio president Shuhei Yoshida says publisher is finding it hard to attract third-party support for portable consoles; hopes Assassin's Creed will prove good recruitment tool when it launches on the Vita.

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Sony has reportedly admitted that it is having a hard time attracting third-party developers to make games for its PlayStation Vita console.

Sony reportedly wants more third-party devs to support the Vita.
Sony reportedly wants more third-party devs to support the Vita.

In an interview with PlayStation: The Official Magazine (as spotted by blog The Silent Chief), Sony Computer Entertainment worldwide studio president Shuhei Yoshida is reported as saying:

"We're having a more difficult time than we had anticipated in terms of getting support from third-party publishers, but that's our job."

Yoshida then went on to say that the publisher will continue to try to recruit third-party developers and pointed to the upcoming Assassin's Creed III: Liberation as a game that could entice other developers to see the benefit of working with the Vita.

"We will continue to talk to development communities and publishing partners, and tell them why Vita can provide a great experience for the IPs they have, and I hope the Assassin's Creed game will prove that," Yoshida reportedly told the magazine.

Sony was under pressure to drop the price of the Vita upon its North American launch earlier this year, with the system reaching 1.2 million units sold globally by February 26, 2012.

Earlier this year, Mario creator Shigeru Miyamoto weighed in on the Vita's problems, saying that the system's software is not matching the abilities of its hardware.

In July, Gearbox CEO Randy Pitchford said he is eager to get Borderlands 2 on the Vita.

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