Psychonauts 2 Successful Funding Campaign Has Ended [UPDATE]

"I've got my mind on my money, and my money on my mind," - Snoop Dogg, probably talking about Psychonauts?

33 Comments

[UPDATE] The crowdfunding for Psychonauts 2 is now over, after more than a month of campaigning. 24,109 backers gave Double Fine $3,829,024 to make the long-anticipated sequel to Psychonauts. About $1,874,000 of that came from investments, and about $1,954,000 came from people who chose rewards.

Double Fine's latest foray into crowdfunding is about to end. Psychonauts 2 was successfully funded last week, reaching the largest video game crowdfunding target goal ever.

No Caption Provided

Psychonauts 2 was announced at The Game Awards, alongside the campaign that would help crowdfund the game. Since then, more than 20,000 backers have helped raise a total of over $3.8 million.

Double Fine is celebrating the successful end to their campaign on Twitch. The livestream features talk about the history of Psychonauts. Voice actor Richard Horvitz, who is known for his roles in Invader Zim and Mighty Morphin' Power Rangers, was on the stream and talked about how he got the gig to voice Psychonauts' main character Raz.

Schafer revealed story details for the Psychonauts sequel in a Reddit AMA. It was also recently announced that the PlayStation 4 would be getting a re-release of the original Psychonauts this spring. You can check out GameSpot's exclusive interview with Double Fine CEO Tim Schafer on the upcoming Psychonauts 2 here.

Got a news tip or want to contact us directly? Email news@gamespot.com

Join the conversation
There are 33 comments about this story
33 Comments  RefreshSorted By 
GameSpot has a zero tolerance policy when it comes to toxic conduct in comments. Any abusive, racist, sexist, threatening, bullying, vulgar, and otherwise objectionable behavior will result in moderation and/or account termination. Please keep your discussion civil.

Avatar image for Hurvl
Hurvl

$3,829,024 dollars from 24,109 backers make the average pledge almost 159 dollars, which is really high. I haven't visited the site, because all I care about was whether it would succeed or not and knew that Gamespot would answer that for me, so I don't know what might have caused this high average pledge. Perhaps investors have to invest a larger amount of money, not just 10 or even 50 dollars.

Avatar image for Zandan
Zandan

Time for the next one.

Avatar image for neptune432
neptune432

@gtrslinger: Only part of the budget comes from crowdfunding. The rest comes from Double Fine's external partners.

Avatar image for ferval100
ferval100

https://youtu.be/j0lKjq0W2_s

Avatar image for dyshonest
Dyshonest

Double Fine managed to panhandle more millions of dollars... People never learn, do they?

Avatar image for immortality20
immortality20

Really wish xbox was also getting the rerelease, loved the game so much on original xbox.

Avatar image for Alurit
Alurit

@immortality20: I don't see any reason why would not put it on consoles

Avatar image for catsimboy
catsimboy

"24,109 suckers gave Double Fine $3,829,024 to make half of the long-anticipated sequel to Psychonauts (before Schafer releases it on early access and asks for more money)" There I fixed your article for you.

Avatar image for Ryusui
Ryusui

@catsimboy: Massive Chalice released without issue. And it's actually pretty good. If I had to recommend only one of Double Fine's crowdfunded projects so far, I'd name that one.

Avatar image for catsimboy
catsimboy

@Ryusui: Massive Chalice wasn't directed by Tim Schafer he's the problem.

Avatar image for Iemander
Iemander

@catsimboy: All of them were great, except for Spacebase df-9. Costume Quest, Stacking,, Broken Age Massive Chalice, Iron Bigrade, Brutal Legend. And the absolute pinnacle of 3D platformers ever created, Psychonauts.

I think the most tragic thing about Kickstarter is how toxic game communities can be. They start expecting every single game to get 80%+ scores and start screaming murder and fire everytime there's a failure, which is just a normal result of a creative process.

And then these communities are surprised publishers only focus on games that generate huge amounts of money. Games like Psychonauts 2 aren't being developed because publishers are even more afraid of failures. So if you don't want these failures, just stick to Call of Duty, Far Cry, Assassin's Creed and every other mass-market appeal game that's specifically engineered to not be a failure. Games designed with graphs and charts in board meetings with suits.

You want to invest in something new or surprising? Be prepared to play some failures among the delights. Just deal with it.

Avatar image for virtuasega
virtuaSEGA

@Iemander: Pinnicle of 3d platformers oh god that's rich LOLOLOL.

Avatar image for dyshonest
Dyshonest

@Iemander: "I think the most tragic thing about Kickstarter is how toxic game communities can be."

Are you, by chance, a writer at Kotaku or Polygon?

Avatar image for Iemander
Iemander

@dyshonest: that'd be extremely odd. Isn't Kotaku leading some of those toxic gaming communities in the name of social justice?

Avatar image for dyshonest
Dyshonest

@Iemander: You're using their language.

Avatar image for Hurvl
Hurvl

@dyshonest: But the important thing isn't which words he uses, but what he's expressing with those words. I see nothing Kotaku/Polygon or "other gaming site"-ish about his comment. It's just a comment.

Avatar image for dyshonest
Dyshonest

@Hurvl: When he's referring to gaming communities as "toxic", yes, he is using their language and expressing their sentiments.

Ignoring the fact that very few people outside of social justice circles use "toxic" in a non-poisonous context.

Avatar image for Hurvl
Hurvl

@dyshonest: It's not a word I hear often, but I've heard that word used to describe bad behavior in gaming communities from many other sources, e.g. Riot Games describing LoL and other devs, so I don't agree that Kotaku "owns" that word and anyone using it automatically supports whatever Kotaku supports.

Avatar image for catsimboy
catsimboy

@Iemander: There's plenty of great Kickstarter games that don't go overbudget and have to have their directors go beg for more money. Broken Age was a point and click adventure game and Schafer couldn't finish it with $3.3 million ($400k original goal lolololol) It'd be fine if Schafer was just the lead writer or artist but when he's the head of project he doesn't manage it well. Out of all the games you listed Schafer only directed Spacebase, Brutal Legend and Psychonauts and on every one of those they went over budget.

Avatar image for dyshonest
Dyshonest

@catsimboy: > Great

> Kickstarter

> Games

Does not compute.

List three "great" Kickstarter games.

Avatar image for catsimboy
catsimboy

@dyshonest: Pillars of Eternity, Wasteland 2, Divinity: Original Sin, Shovel Knight, Banner Saga.

Avatar image for dyshonest
Dyshonest

@catsimboy: The Banner Saga - 100k? It didn't need crowdfunding. It was just a quick way to give the game public attention. 100k doesn't pay for anything significant.

Shovel Knight - 75k? This, similarly, didn't need it. Compounded even more by the fact that it's an 8-bit sidescroller.

The rest could have still happened without panhandling---er, crowdfunding. You know indie games existed before these panhandling platforms existed, right?

Divinity is also a poor choice to mention. They returned to Kickstarter for their second game... I guess they blew all of the money they made on D:OS and all of the excess Kickstarter funds on partying or something, or living in a overly expensive, useless location like San Francisco (hi Tim. "San Fran is too expensive." Schafer. Why are you there, then?)

Avatar image for Iemander
Iemander

@catsimboy: wow, resorting to lies are we? Spacebase's lead was JP LeBreton. He and about 11 others were fired after the game "released".

Brutal Legend was called over budget by one of the biggest pricks in the gaming industry, he's one of the main guys doing nothing but flaunting call of duty's sales numbers in the press. Activision CEO Robert Kotick. You're free to play his within budget games if you agree with him so much.

And bringing Psychonauts in this is beyond low. That's a classic and sold millions. There's a reason why this kickstarter is so successful.

Anyway you missed the point of my post entirely.

Avatar image for dyshonest
Dyshonest

@Iemander: Brutal Legend was overbudget, though, and the major reason was Tim Schafer not knowing what type of game he wanted to make. I'm sorry that you don't like Activision, but Kotick wasn't lying.

Psychonauts is such a "classic". It's ten years old.

It reminds me of the good ol' days...

Avatar image for khankalili
khankalili

@Iemander: Psychonauts had a really bad release, and only became a 'classic/cult hit' after a whole lot of youtube fame gave it attention. Personally never really liked it, and you saying that it 'sold millions' just proves that you don't understand how number of players/sales works. A significant amount of the 'players' never even played the game and just bought it on steam because it was on sale (check the statistics).

So it could be seen as a good investment...apart from the really bad investment contract that double fine gives their investors. It is basically a company on the edge of fiscal bankruptcy. That's why it relies on kickstarter to fund anything. Don't believe me then check it out for yourself, and at the same time ask yourself why a company that keeps making 'blockbusters' and games that sell 'millions' needs kickstarter to make games.

Don't you think they would finally be fiscally responsible enough to make a game without extra money being pumped in from stupid consumers? ('stupid consumers' is just my opinion for anyone that gives money to a company that can't even find enough interested investors before they have any promises of getting anything substantial back in return... yeah I'm not a fan of kickstarter)

Avatar image for Iemander
Iemander

@khankalili: investors =/= gamers. They don't give a shit what's fun or not. They just want a minimal increase of 5% over what they invested. Something that brings in money. Regardless if it's games, fridges or coca cola. If you're waiting on investors you'll never get the game you want.

And Psychonauts did sell millions, that's exactly what I said.

Avatar image for catsimboy
catsimboy

@Iemander: Yeah it sold millions... minus the 's' there at the end. Double Fine's own numbers show it sold almost 1.7 million (so not millions plural) copies but a majority of those sales occurred over five years after it released and most of them on Steam and Humble Bundle. And like it or not money is needed to make games and if they're asking the gamers to put up the cash we have a right to grill them on being crappy money managers. (oh and BTW they're trying to turn gamers into investors with Fig, you just have to be an accredited investor under US law which means you need $1mil net worth or single yearly income of $200k hooray! thanks Fig!)

Avatar image for zeca04
zeca04

Too bad take two doesnt really have a history of good money management. I hope those backers get the product that satisfies them.

Avatar image for Iemander
Iemander

Holy crap, Psychonauts 1 was absolutely superb. Great characters, great story, amazing level design, hilarious script. Here comes the milkman!!

Avatar image for hyksiu
hyksiu

Wanna play it so badly!