Feature Article

PlayStation 4's Command Over Exclusives Leads To Promising Start For PS5

Sony's PS4 was the dominant console of the eighth generation thanks to a tight focus on strong gaming experiences and a slate of phenomenal titles.

The PlayStation 5 is officially out in the world, if you can get one, and its release means that Sony has officially kicked off the next generation of PlayStation. While the platform maker will continue to support its last-generation console for at least a couple of years and we can expect new games to still appear on the PS4, we're unlikely to see new iterations on the legacy machine, or any major moves with peripherals or new ideas. The PS4's time in the spotlight has come to an end.

As we enter a new chapter in the life of Sony's PlayStation brand, we're taking a look back at the life of the PS4, its place on the gaming landscape, and how things are changing with the PS5. Since its release in 2013, the PlayStation 4 has been a force on the gaming landscape, and across the last seven years, it's been clear that Sony and its gaming machine took the lead against the competition.

Sony's lead with the PS4 started with some missteps by its major rival, Microsoft, with the Xbox One. But it wasn't just a few key flubs from the competition at launch that propelled the PS4. Sony's console has become well-known for killer exclusives, and for a long portion of the generation, was the premiere home for big-hype indie games, as well. Sony also managed to make some moves in the hardware department--while not all of its ideas have defined the industry, its contribution to the mainstreaming of virtual reality had a big effect on the way the last few years have played out.

With the PS4, Sony developed a clear vision for its gaming machine, and while it tried out a variety of ideas along the way, it never wavered from making sure its system was a place to easily play and share great games. Though it didn't have to fight through the same rough public relations issues as its competition, Sony learned lessons from its own missteps with the PS3 and is carrying those lessons through to its next-generation console.

A Home For Indies

The PS4 would come to be known for bringing some of the best first-party titles of the generation. At launch, however, the PS4's lineup was a little lackluster. The console made up ground in a different realm, establishing itself as a premier showcase for indie games right from the jump. It all started with the extremely impressive side-scrolling shoot-em-up Resogun, but Sony didn't slow down on its indie focus throughout the PS4's life.

Small, interesting, and innovative titles drew a lot of attention to the indie gaming scene in the PS3 generation, and Sony had some big winners during that time with games like Journey and Hotline Miami. It continued to cultivate itself as a curated home for great indie titles on the PS4. Coupled with PlayStation Plus, which brought free games to subscribers, Sony managed to snag a lot of high-caliber and high-profile indies--and to thrive off their popularity.

Notable among them are Rocket League, which launched for free on PS Plus and became a phenomenon, and Fall Guys, which followed the same model and won some major acclaim. Sony also hit on some smaller titles, while working to make indies a bigger part of its showcase. The most memorable is No Man's Sky, Hello Games' massive exploration title that featured heavily in Sony's E3 2014 presentation. No Man's Sky's position during E3 generated enormous hype for the game--initially to the detriment of Hello Games as the game struggled to meet player expectations at launch, but largely to the benefit of the PS4. Today, No Man's Sky has seen several huge updates and has become well-regarded as the full, fascinating title that got players so excited six years ago.

Nothing seems to have changed about Sony's indie focus with the launch of the PS5. Several of PS5's smaller launch titles, like Bugsnax, got a lot of pre-release hype. Bugsnax appeared in Sony's showcases for PS5 games ahead of its launch, and when the console dropped, Bugsnax released right along with it, coming in free for PlayStation Plus subscribers. Sony's showcased launch games also included The Pathless, which comes from Abzu developer Giant Squid, a studio founded by developers who worked on the hit PS3 indie Journey.

The PS4 has waned somewhat as the location to go for worthy indie games over the course of its life--Microsoft has managed to cut back into that space a bit, while Sony has turned more of its attention to big first-party exclusives--but it still maintains a healthy collection of worthy titles. For years, one of the best things about owning a PS4 was getting access to some of the best indies around, if not as exclusives, then at least a little ahead of the competition.

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An Expensive Upgrade

Apart from the original PS4, Sony released two other iterations on the console over the course of the generation: the PS4 Slim and the PS4 Pro. The Slim introduced an improved form factor on the original PlayStation 4, but didn't mess with the internal hardware. The PS4 Pro, however, became the definitive version of the console.

As TVs adopted 4K resolutions and became more widespread and affordable, Sony put out a PS4 that could take advantage. The Pro amped up the original PS4 hardware with a more powerful CPU and GPU for enhanced performance. It also leaned into digital storage with a 1TB internal hard drive that was double the size of the original PS4's. The PS4 Pro ran games better and created better images, while offering more space to download and store games. It was an improvement over the PS4 in every way, and Sony showed off its capabilities with titles like Gran Turismo Sport that were tuned to take advantage of the hardware.

In a way, the PS4 Pro was a bummer for early adopters. It was a better version of the original PS4 and released at the same price of $400--meaning if you wanted to go for an upgrade, you needed to double your gaming investment. That said, the gains were significant if you had a TV that could leverage them, to say nothing of games running better in general on the Pro. As the generation wore on, the Pro got the best out of a lot of games, including Marvel's Spider-Man and Control. Luckily, the PS4 Pro was never essential to run those games if you were saddled with the earlier version, but it wasn't a great feeling for players who stuck with Sony in the early days of the generation, only to find themselves wishing they had the kind of console that could take advantage of their spiffy new TVs years later. With the power found in the launch PS5, it seems like Sony's next-generation offering might keep better pace with TV technology as it ramps up, but it certainly seems possible that adopters on Day One could find themselves wishing they'd waited down the line.

Tech Swings, Hits, And Misses

The PS4 had a leg-up on its Xbox One competition when it launched. While Microsoft went hard on trying to make the Xbox One an all-in-one entertainment machine, Sony held back, preferring to keep a central focus on gaming. That helped the PS4 avoid some pitfalls, but this generation was an era of trend-chasing technologies, and the PS4 had its fair share of ideas that sounded interesting at the time, but never really went anywhere.

Probably the biggest elements of the PS4 that didn't take off were related to app and second-screen integration. Smartphones had made a huge impact on gaming when the PS4 released, and many developers and publishers at the time thought that combining their games with smartphone apps would help broaden their appeal and create all kinds of additional functionality. Sony made some inroads in that direction as well. It created a second screen app, which added some ability to control your console on your smartphone, and the more interesting PlayLink app, along with a few games that used it. Effectively, the app turned your smartphone's touchscreen into a simplified game controller specific to certain games. PlayLink was actually a great idea for bringing more casual people into the fold--Jackbox Games started using the same tech idea years earlier for its Jackbox Party Pack series, and has created a line of fun, engaging, and easy-to-play party games. But there wound up being few games that supported PlayLink. At this point, you're kind of hard-pressed to find anyone who knows about it.

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The PS4 launched partway into the life of Sony's second handheld console, the PlayStation Vita, and integrating the two machines together was also a major push for the PS4. The Vita had remote play capabilities, which remain pretty impressive: Remote play allows you to stream your PS4's screen to your Vita over a wi-fi connection, so you can play your PS4 games on the machine. Less useful was the Vita's second screen capability, which allows it to work as a controller for your PS4. Not many games bothered to give the Vita any additional functionality, so it never took off as an especially useful PS4 component.

Other pieces of PS4 tech also felt like they might be a bigger deal, but never really developed. The DualShock 4 controller sports a big touchpad right in the center, allowing for touch and gesture controls in games--but few developers outside Sony's first-party studios ever really took advantage of it, and it mostly became a big, simple button for opening menus. The same is true of the internal SixAxis gyroscope that allows for motion control if you move the controller in various ways. The motion controls never turned out to be especially responsive, and few games implemented them. Even the ones that did, like The Last of Us Part 2, kept the functionality fairly minimal--in that game, you can shake the controller occasionally to recharge your flashlight's batteries. There was also the lightbar, which would change colors to indicate which players was using which controller during multiplayer games and sometimes flash or change in keeping with gameplay. It was another element that went underutilized, partially because it was hard for players to actually see what was happening with it, thanks to its position on the side of the controller facing away from them. Sony eventually added a strip of light to the touchpad in later iterations of the DualShock 4, but that never resulted in more developers making use of it.

The PS4's controller did lead to some good ideas, though. The dedicated Share button makes it easy to quickly take and share screenshots and videos, for instance, a function that's so useful that both Nintendo and Microsoft have included it as well. And several ideas, like the touch pad, the Share button, and the built-in speaker, have made their way forward with the PS5's DualSense controller. The DualSense is, at least at launch, the PS5's most impressive feature, and a lot of the technology found within it has been directly carried over from what worked for the PS4.

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Making VR (Somewhat) More Affordable

Virtual reality roared onto the gaming scene in this generation when Oculus and its Rift first hit the industry stage. But while PC VR rigs drove a lot of the conversation, Sony might have done the most to make VR approachable with the advent of PlayStation VR.

Sony's VR headset isn't nearly the most high-end one on the market, but it came relatively early in the ramp-up in VR, and it had the virtue of being cheaper and more approachable than any other system on the market. First, it leveraged the big PS4 install base, getting around the requirement of having a powerful, VR-ready PC. Second, it kept the price down--if you already owned a PS4, the whole PSVR rig would run you only about $400, which was significantly cheaper than the $600 Rift (which had additional costs, like its motion-sensitive Touch controllers, besides). It was even cheaper if you were a longtime PlayStation fan who had bought into other PS3 and PS4 peripherals, like the PlayStation Camera and PlayStation Move controllers. With those already hooked up to your system, all you needed was the headset.

Though it wasn't incredibly cheap by any stretch, PSVR was, for many who were excited by the technology, a much more affordable option than what Oculus and HTC offered on PC. Sony significantly lowered the barrier of entry to virtual reality, and while the PSVR hasn't sold like gangbusters or totally revamped the gaming landscape by helping create an overwhelming VR wave, it has helped keep VR gaming in the conversation. Sony has a number of VR exclusives, including Astro Bot: Rescue Mission, Blood & Truth, Farpoint, and The Inpatient, and Sony's support led to some exceptionally cool VR versions of games, like Tetris Effect, Resident Evil 7, and Thumper. PSVR isn't the most important thing to happen for the PS4 this generation, but Sony did make a significant contribution to making virtual reality an actual reality for a lot of players.

We've yet to see how big a part VR will play in Sony's plans for the PS5, but at the very least, its existing hardware isn't going anywhere. The PS5 supports the existing PSVR--you just need an adapter for the PS4 camera, which Sony will provide for free. And thanks to the new console's backwards compatibility features, PS4 VR games are playable on the PS5 right now.

Fighting Cross-Play

The rise of Fortnite as the biggest thing in games affected all corners of the industry. As far as the PS4 is concerned, the pressures of Fortnite might have changed Sony's policy for the better, at least as far as players are concerned.

It was Fortnite developer Epic Games that pushed both Sony and Microsoft to allow for cross-play between the platforms, something that was exceedingly rare in past generations. At first, Sony didn't go for it, fighting to keep games on the PS4 compatible with only other PS4 owners. But eventually, Sony caved to the pressure of Fortnite's huge player base, allowing developers to create opportunities in their game for cross-play integration.

With the gates opening, the flow of cross-play games seems to be increasing. Sony's change of heart allowed Destiny 2 to implement cross-save capabilities that allow players to move their characters from one platform to another, a huge move for the game's player base in the wake of its release of the PC version. Call of Duty: Modern Warfare took advantage with cross-play for its multiplayer modes. And now, several games are getting cross-generation multiplayer capabilities as Sony moves to the PS5, including Destiny 2 and Call of Duty: Black Ops Cold War. Cross-play is still picking up steam, but if the situation holds, it could lead to a new era in multiplayer gaming as it becomes a lot less important what platforms you buy games on.

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The Power Of Exclusives

The realm in which the PS4 has soared more than any other is in big-budget, well-regarded exclusive titles. There are almost too many to count and they run the gamut of genres. First-party and exclusive titles are the main way in which the PS4 defined itself, and while not every exclusive was a hit, Sony made big moves throughout the PS4's life to secure what turned out to be some of the best games on the market. It made owning a PS4 a must for players who wanted access to many of the games that defined the eighth generation.

The early slate of PS4 exclusive games--titles such as Killzone: Shadow Fall and Knack--didn't blow the doors off, but they did do a good job of showing off what the console could do. Knack excelled at displaying tons of particles on screen at once to demonstrate the PS4's power, while Shadow Fall showcased some of the PS4's more interesting aspects, with a focus on touchpad controls. But it would be the later games that really set a tone for the PS4 having some top-end experiences.

Those generation-defining titles include cinematic action games such as The Last of Us Part 2 and God of War, expansive open-world titles like Marvel's Spider-Man and Ghost of Tsushima, and massively influential breakouts like Bloodborne and Persona 5. It's in exclusives that Sony has been pummeling the competition most clearly. For a lot of games, PS4 is the only place to play them. With many, many others, including massive sellers like the Call of Duty series and games with big communities such as Destiny 2, Sony secured timed exclusivity deals that meant DLC and multiplayer offerings went to PS4 first. Sony made a number of big gets across the course of the generation, and that only increased its cache.

Sony made additional moves by acquiring Insomniac Games, the team behind Ratchet & Clank and Marvel's Spider-Man, in 2019. The studio joined its earlier purchase of Sucker Punch Productions, the studio behind Ghost of Tsushima, which it had grabbed in 2011. At this point, Sony has a stable of first-party developers that also includes Naughty Dog, Guerrilla Games, and Sony Santa Monica. It's an extremely impressive group, all of whom put out big hits for the PS4.

It's impossible to overestimate the prestige Sony gained from first-party titles this generation. Games like God of War, Marvel's Spider-Man, The Last of Us Part 2, Horizon Zero Dawn, and Ghost of Tsushima haven't just been big sellers--they've driven big conversations around games. Many of those titles have been high in the running for the best games of the year. Sony developed a very impressive library of exclusive games that elevated the reputation of the platform, while having a big impact on the gaming landscape at the time. In a big way, it was the exclusives that defined the generation--and Sony had a lot of the best.

As with its indie support, Sony isn't slowing down on its push for exclusives with the PS5. The console launched with a pair of very big names in Demon's Souls and Marvel's Spider-Man: Miles Morales, which launched on both PS5 and PS4 but got a next-gen upgrade for its PS5 release. Sony has showcased a number of big names coming down the pipe, including sequels to God of War, Horizon Zero Dawn, and Ratchet & Clank. It seems that in the PS5 generation, Sony will continue to work to make the PS5 known as the place for big prestige games that can't be found anywhere else.

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Next-Gen: The PS5

With the PS5, it seems like Sony has adopted something of an "if it ain't broke, don't fix it" mentality. The PS4 was a huge success, and while some elements and technology ideas didn't really pan out, many of Sony's moves in the eighth generation worked exceedingly well and have continued with the release of its new console.

A lot of the ideas of the DualShock 4 controller moved forward with the DualSense, which has quickly distinguished itself as the most impressive element of the PS5. The DualSense sports a dedicated Share button (now called Create), a touchpad, and a built-in speaker. Sony also added a built-in microphone that makes party chat a lot easier. But the best part of the new controller is its focus on haptic feedback. In early games like Astro's Playroom and Call of Duty: Black Ops Cold War, the use of haptics in the DualSense has made a world of difference. Astro's Playroom showcases the controller's capabilities with specific feedback for just about everything you do, from walking across a sandy beach to trudging through a gale-force wind. Cold War uses haptics to create distinct feels for each of the guns you wield in the game, adding a powerful new layer of immersion.

The DualSense also really impresses with its adaptive triggers, which can change their tension and feel depending on what you're doing in-game. Spider-Man: Miles Morales, Cold War, and Astro's Playroom all use the triggers in different ways to mimic specific actions you're taking on-screen. The quick thwip of firing off a web in Spider-Man feels different from the punchy spring of the gun trigger in Cold War--which is also different from the steadier but harder-to-squeeze trigger used for aiming down sights. Astro replicates the feel of actions like pulling back a spring with tighter triggers, and all of them provide a different sensation that changes the act of pushing buttons on a controller to bring you a little closer to what's happening in the game. Hopefully, we'll continue to see developers push the limits of the DualSense controller--it's possible it could get ignored as the console's lifespan goes on and developers make games for multiple consoles, but the possibilities are extremely interesting and its early implementation is encouraging.

No Caption Provided

Sound is also an area that Sony is pushing with the PS5, sporting new 3D surround sound tech. At launch, that technology only works with headphones, but Sony says it's adapting it for speakers in the future, as well. Like the DualSense's feedback and triggers, Sony's Tempest 3D Audiotech brings sound in all around you in a way that makes the action on screen feel a little closer to real life. So far, 3D audio isn't necessarily changing game experiences completely, but elements like the street sounds of Spider-Man or the explosions of Cold War are impressive and immersive additions, and it seems like the implementation of the tech will only get better.

And of course, the PS5 is a far more powerful machine than its predecessor. Sony has made much of its reduced load times thanks to its internal SSD, and they're an across-the-board improvement on both next-gen titles and PS4 games. While shorter load times aren't the flashiest of improvements, developers seem excited to see how they can utilize the ability for seamless transitions and access to huge maps to improve games in the next generation. And so far, less waiting in-game and truer fast travel mean we're playing games a lot more than we're waiting for them to be ready.

Backwards Compatibility Means The PS4 Lives On

The slate of launch titles for the PS5 wasn't necessarily an enormous one, but Sony has shored up its offerings with a major push in backwards compatibility. That's one of the big areas the PS4 was lacking during its lifetime--it's something PlayStation fans have clamored for, and an area where the Xbox One was miles ahead of the PS4. Sony solved the issue somewhat with its PlayStation Now subscription service, but it's made a huge stride with the release of the PS5.

Out of the box, just about every PS4 game is playable on the PS5, and the opportunity to play all your old games on new hardware is pretty impressive. A few games have been (or will be) optimized for the next-gen console, but even without updates, PS5 owners enjoy benefits like faster load times and improved frame rates or resolutions if games were built to naturally take advantage of better specs. PlayStation Plus subscribers also get access to a slate of PS4 hits they can play on their new consoles for free, which bolsters the PS5's launch library with a bunch of great games you might have missed in the last generation.

No Caption Provided

The sun might be setting on the PS4, but so much backwards compatibility support means that it feels like PS4 games are getting new life with the PS5. You don't have to immediately sink a bunch of additional money into your PS5 purchase just to have games to enjoy it on, while making the transition to the new console nearly seamless. And for the first time in a long time, it doesn't feel like upgrading to a new console generation means you're more or less abandoning the investment in great games that came before it.

With Sony and developers putting effort into optimizing older games for the new hardware, it feels like the PS5 gives a much bigger bang for the buck than the PS4 did. Backwards compatibility blurs the lines between console generations in a way that's great for players. You'll still need PS Now for titles from earlier generations, but the change in focus is a huge step for making the PS5 even more competitive and worthwhile.

Other Matters In Brief

  • PlayStation Now: Sony got ahead of the streaming competition in the PS4 era with PlayStation Now, which offers the ability to stream hundreds of PlayStation titles across multiple generations to the PS4. The service has a huge library, and while its titles tend to be a bit older, it's still an impressive service that solves some of PS4's lack of backward compatibility. PS Now's viability has grown over time with the inclusion of PC support and the ability to download games to your PS4 rather than stream them.
  • Kaz Steps Down: Kaz Hirai served as the president and CEO of Sony throughout the PS4 era, but announced he was stepping down in 2018. His leadership in the eighth generation helped Sony put a stronger focus on gaming that served the PS4 well, helping it to get ahead of the competition and regain some lost loyalty among players in the PS3 era.

The Verdict

Sony's PlayStation consoles have routinely been powerful monoliths in the gaming landscape, even when the platform maker occasionally stumbles. The PS4, however, is pretty much an unmitigated success. By keeping its eye squarely on providing solid gaming experiences, Sony managed to push ahead of the competition on a number of fronts. For many players, the PS4 became their default machine in the eighth generation, and Sony rewarded them with great games over and over again.

As we begin the journey into the next generation, all the good things from the PS4 are continuing forward, with additional improvements. Sony is maintaining support for PS4, it's adding new, useful, and exciting ideas to its controller tech, and it's leveraging the power of improved hardware to continue a focus on enticing games while maintaining the great library it already has through backwards compatibility. The PS5 launches have already brought out some powerhouses, including Spider-Man: Miles Morales and Demon's Souls. The PS4's success is a result of Sony learning a lot of lessons from the past, and while the console tried new things, there was always a clear goal in mind: provide great gaming experiences. This is a console that did that at every turn, and Sony looks primed to continue its winning streak in the next generation.

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Phil Hornshaw

GameSpot editor in Los Angeles, and the co-author of So You Created a Wormhole: The Time Traveler’s Guide to Time Travel and The Space Hero’s Guide to Glory. Hoped the latter would help me get Han Solo hair, but so far, unsuccessful.

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jenovaschilld

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I am happy to see xbox move away from this living room, social media, all in one device and stick with gaming. The xbox, and xbox 360 not only had compelling games, but exclusives to die for. They hit the ground running and contained a diverse and interesting library, unlike the monotone 8th xbox one that only had FPS and bro games.

All three platforms are heavily investing in publishers and developers, this going to be one of the greatest generations of gaming since 1998 or 2007 or maybe 89'.

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MoogleStar

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:D

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FallenOneX

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I bought a PS4 because it as cheaper and they said SFV was an exclusive. Years later I realize that was the only exclusive I bought (and it sucked at launch), and about half of the PS4 games I bought were later rebought for the Switch. I have a Series S now and the PS4 is back in a box.

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rawkstar007

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@FallenOneX: All those exclusives and the only one you played was SFV? You’re missing out man.

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FallenOneX

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@rawkstar007: Only one I bought, played a ton through Gamefly. Had No Man's Sky at launch and actually loved it, also hadn't been following it for years so it was more of a surprise than letdown.

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JustTheTip

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This is why the PS5 will smash the Xbox Series X. Microsoft keeps focusing on making “the most powerful console ever,” while Sony focuses on what actually matters... great games. They also have a powerful console. It doesn’t have to be the most powerful.

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BDRTFM

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Holy necroed articles Batman. Longest Captain Obvious article ever.

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christhunder2

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Yes that's right, provide great gaming experiences with cinematic next gen visuals. So excited, hopeful for a surprise release next year for some of the games teased in their last conference. God of war, Final Fantasy 16 especially for me.

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Edited By DEVILTAZ35

It's only sustainable for so long though. Microsoft is branching out in a huge way into the mobile space and Sony won't have a choice but to either compete or become insignificant in a couple of short years. Consoles are largely meaningless to the vast majority of people. Even 100 million units pales in comparison to the billions using phones for gaming.

I am not saying i even want this to happen but it is happening whether we like it or not. Gamepass and services like this will dominate before too long as it is just tremendous value for money people cash strapped or just casual gamers cannot ignore really.

The fact Microsoft is adding EA play next month is a huge bonus too.

Even if you don't want an Xbox console Microsoft could care less as long as you invest in Gamepass and many are every day with close to 20 million subscribers thus far.

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jenovaschilld

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@deviltaz35: Just wanted to throw this out there, in the gaming industry the shear amount of money from consoles still dwarfs mobile, and pc together. Phones may download more apps, and more purchases - same with PC, but 250+ million 8th gen consoles with a tie in ratio that those platforms would die for is herculean. The gaming industry is huge, and constantly growing, but the console didn't die, it seemed to have just gotten bigger 8th gen.

Billions of people may have a phone.... but that does not mean games sales on phones come anywhere come close to the 800lb gorilla .... console sales. The console is dead or dying is a call that is nearly as old as gaming itself..... yet it still persists.

I do agree that streaming services and subscription based purchases are the future. Near future.... probably not. Lets see how it matures by the end of 9th gen.

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ID0ntKn0w7

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@deviltaz35: I mean, if you look at the breakdown in sales, shitty time-waster games for cell phone zombies can't begin to compete with AAA games. Most people have phones, OK. Thanks for that. But most people don't ask the AT&T guy or the Verizon guy if the new Note will play Assassin's Creed before buying it, because the lion's share of the market belongs to games you wouldn't play on a phone if you could.

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JustTheTip

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Yeah, and it’s going to repeat that domination again this upcoming generation. Even the Switch outsold the Xbox One, while being out for about half as long. I see no reason why the Series X will do any better. Microsoft is just once again focusing on everything but the most important thing, good games.

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onehitta323

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Sony won hands down. Microsoft got destroyed. Wasn't even close at all. It will be the same when the new consoles release as well. Gears of Boredom and Failo couldn't deliver this gen. Better luck next time.

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Bloodborne was the only exclusive I felt was a must play to the point it would have justified (for me) buying a console just for it. GoW was awesome too, but BB is in league of its own.

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guudgidga

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@dhracox: I agree. Two of my favorite games ever. Every other exclusive on the system was largely overrated mediocrity.

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GamerBum

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Currently playing through GOW again but this time on a harder difficulty and I have to say I’m enjoying it a lot more. It’s easily one of the best games I’ve played this gen. I think the extra difficulty makes all the difference.

This game and Spidey are the stand outs.

UC4, TLOU1,2 are average and HZD I actually lost interest but do plan to go back to it on ps5 as long as it’s at 60FPS.

I’ve gotten more out of Xbox exclusives though. Gears 5 campaign is fantastic and the verses is still best in class. Forza Horizon 3 is awesome, Halo 5 on 1X is a different game and the verses multiplayer is among the the best if not the best Halo has had yet.

Between these 3 games alone I’ve got hundreds of hours racked up. Then there’s the smaller stuff like Quantum Break which was good, Sunset Overdrive was fantastic and can’t wait to play it again on XseX with auto HDR and higher framerates. The 2 ori games were amazing too. For me Xbox had the best heavy hitters again this gen.

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TheChoujinVirus

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yeah, because power-grabbing studios, money-hatting exclusive rights, and cannibalizing failing divisions make a company oh-so successful.
despite the fact that this method is nearly risking killing the gaming industry in favor of a Sony monopoly.
but don't take my word for it, remember the Sony leaks

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Thanatos2k

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Edited By Thanatos2k

@thechoujinvirus: "yeah, because power-grabbing studios, money-hatting exclusive rights, and cannibalizing failing divisions make a company oh-so successful.

Yeah which is why Microsoft is doomed to--wait, you were trying to describe Sony? Hahahha sure dude.

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Gamerforlife96

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@thechoujinvirus: and what about microsoft buying zenimax and make it a monopoly huh

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briguyb13

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Sorry, but that's just opinion about the validity of Sony's exclusives this gen. I've enjoyed a few of them, but Nintendo's exclusives were just better this gen.

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Thanatos2k

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@briguyb13: Sales told the story. It's not opinion.

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briguyb13

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@Thanatos2k: Why are you replying to a month-old comment?

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Thanatos2k

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@briguyb13: Gamespot pretended like the article was new.

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Just1MoHr

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@briguyb13: Sorry as both of you are wrong. Nintendo is Shovelware galore now & Sony is boring single player games (less Spiderman & GOW). I enjoyed XB's multiplayer games & the many 3rd party multiplayer on XB1x. I will take Halo, Gears & Crossfire X over both of those Sony mentioned games when push comes to shove.

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allencc3

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@just1mohr: Not gonna lie, but multiplayer gets pretty boring to me after a while. Who wants to sit up and play multiplayer all day? I'd rather play something more meaningful or story driven like Resident Evil or Final Fantasy.

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PsychoMantisIII

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@briguyb13: Sorry, but yours is also just an opinion; as I enjoyed Sony's exclusives more than nintendo.

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bababooey12

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@psychomantisiii: Yes, and this article is a matter of opinion by the author...like how he talks about No Man's Sky which received bad reviews because of the lack of content similar to SOT, although I will say I have played both here recently and think content wise SOT has come a long way...and No Man's Sky is still boring.

Also note too when it comes to Sony its always the same mentioned exculsives and franchises...think that's sad for a console with 400 plus exculsives this gen....

The author talks about how the PS5 launches with notable powerhouses etc, those would be....you have Spiderman and a remake, hardly would I count that as powerhouses etc. The BC on the PS5 is a joke lol may not even have enhancements to those titles... seems lazy to me.

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Gamerforlife96

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@bababooey12: and you have an old games running at higher frames for next gen wow so awesome and how do you know bc is a joke on ps5 did you try it i know you are an xbox fanboy but plzz dont make yourself look dumb

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bababooey12

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Edited By bababooey12

@gamerforlife96: I was going off of what Sony had said in regards to BC stating that a select few(at first now they are saying 4000 plus) will be enhanced and to also try the games out on PS4 before PS5 because you may not like how it plays. Also they had stated that games might not play correctly on PS5 etc. That is why I feel like their BC is a joke...if you're going to counter someone at least back it up with something, otherwise you just sound stupid... At the very least it goes back to the whole they haven't really been transparent on things.

Lol, yes there will be old games running at higher FPS, loading faster, better graphics etc....but there will also be quite a bit of new games. The launch window seems decent enough Halo Infinite, Everwild, Scorn, Medium Ascent, Call Of the Sea etc. Difference Sony is known for talking up their exculsives a good year or two in advance or even longer. Not usually the case with Microsoft...guess we shall see.

"Furthermore, Sony points out that some functionalities that were available on PS4 might not be available when playing on PS5, and some games may exhibit "unexpected behaviour" when played on PS5.

Strangely, Sony also warns users to test their PS4 games on PS5 before buying any add-ons to ensure "you are happy with the play experience".

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lostn

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this strategy won't work for much longer once Microsoft buys out every publisher and wins next gen with their fatter wallet.

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Barighm

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Edited By Barighm

Eh. Honestly, I don't think the exclusives were THAT great. It's more MS building up so much ill will, and the Wii collapsing so badly at the end, that most gamers felt like the PS4 was the only real choice. And we were saying right from the beginning of the generation that every major Xbox exclusive would eventually hit PC. That ended up being truer and truer as the generation advanced, so that was even less incentive to buy an Xbox and to get a PS4 or Switch (or both) instead.

So it's not so much that PS4 was so amazingly awesome from the outset, even Sony said they didn't understand why sales were so good, but that everyone else was worse...and then Playstation proved to be just as good as it has been every generation, so we felt like we got our money's worth.

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bababooey12

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Edited By bababooey12

@Barighm: lol to each his own goes the saying right...if you're not a PC player then the games ending up on PC eventually etc wouldn't matter, take that away and what ill will was there....I bought an Xbox going into this generation and have been very happy with my purchase certainly made my money back...the kinect wasn't a selling point for me I knew I wasn't going to use it...one big selling point though is the fact that 4K was starting to get big and I wanted a next gen console that had a 4K drive in it(Xbox One S)...which PS4 lacked this whole generation.

The next driving factor for me was I go where I feel the 3rd party games will look and play better, usually third party end up being better on Xbox.

Last and most important is the multiplayer aspect. I have always felt and still do that Xbox offers the better multiplayer experience, this gen is no different.

Again, you think only from a PC perspective..not everyone who plays on consoles also play on a PC. Obviously if you're a PC no crap why would you get it for the Xbox if your preference is PC....that doesn't make PS better than Xbox.

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theduckofdeath

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@Barighm: Also the $100 price premium due to Kinect, whose utility was questionable and turned out to be abandoned, ultimately. PS4 was just a better bet for most people, if you can or only want to jump into a single console. Let's be honest -- the built of the libraries are 3rd party multiplatform games.

Sony fans want to swear it was the exclusives that made the difference, and it really wasn't. They constantly overstate (an understatement) the draw. Not saying those games are not good ones overall, just that they're just additional...games. Exclusivity is what makes them stand out.

If you gave me a choice, I would take Demon's Souls remake and Bloodborne over any TLOU or even GoW. I know that gameplay will be the star of the show. Gameplay is borrowed and seems to be an after thought with most of the SP cinematic games. Challenge is on the backburner, too.

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bababooey12

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@theduckofdeath: Ah, is there really much of a difference though with what Microsoft did with the kinect vs what Sony is doing, going into the next generation. I mean with Sony's two models, they're basically saying that having an extra disk drive is worth an extra $100...

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theduckofdeath

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Edited By theduckofdeath

@bababooey12: I think Sony was under pressure from the Series S|X reveal. The discless version would probably have been more expensive if Sony revealed first. They want to be able to say "PS5 starts at $399." The small print is, if you can find a discless model. I don't think they can afford to sell to many at $399, and will probably manufacture far more of the $499 models, no matter what.

Microsoft never justified the existence of Kinect. I did not work well for gestures, "XBox On" command response was horrendous, and they did not produce viable Kinect games. That not even getting into the always on stipulation (which isn't a big deal for most people), except Kinect also had to be connected at all times, allegedly. Microsoft had no answers for renting games, either. Discs were just license keys after install. To this day, we have yet to get an explanation about how the could have come to E3 before launch with so many undesirable changes and so much unanswered.

I went with XB1 because I liked the launch lineup, controller and services. Can't blame anyone for betting on PS4 at the start of this gen. Sony is pretty hush about a lot of things this time around, and I'm suspicious.

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PsychoMantisIII

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@Barighm: The majority thought they were great, so this article is not objectively wrong

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Barighm

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@psychomantisiii: Who said its objectively wrong?

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CashPrizes

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That's a whole lot to read for something we have all known since E3 2013. PS4 and Sony won this generation as hard as any company has ever won a generation (except the NES but that wasn't fair, Master System and other competitors launched years too late).

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