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Oculus Quest 2 Preorders: Where To Buy, Release Date, And More

Facebook has revealed its brand-new VR headset, the Oculus Quest 2, which improves on the original in some key ways.

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Oculus has revealed its latest VR headset, the Oculus Quest 2, which serves as a successor to the popular Quest. Like its predecessor, the Oculus Quest 2 is another all-in-one VR headset, with a number of significant changes. The Oculus Quest 2 is available to preorder right now, with a release date of October 13, and comes in two different models: 64GB for $299 and 256GB for $399.

The Oculus Quest 2 is a very similar experience to the original Quest, with some obvious improvements in resolution and refresh rate as well as general specs. We see an increase in resolution from 1600x1440 to 1832x1920 per eye as well as support for 90Hz refresh rate coming after launch--at launch, it's capable of 72Hz like the original headset and an experimental 90Hz feature for system software like Home and the Browser.

The new resolution and refresh rate comes with a shift from dual OLED displays to fast-switch LCD. It's equipped with a Qualcomm Snapdragon XR2 processor and 6GB of RAM, a jump from the original headset's Snapdragon 835 CPU and 4GB of RAM. The Quest 2 doesn't improve on battery life, however, as it keeps the 2- to 3-hour playtime of its predecessor.

In terms of the Quest 2's build, the headset is smaller and more comfortable than the original. It's easier to put on and take off while wearing glasses as well as wear for longer periods of time. The Quest 2 also features a new strap system that takes some time getting used to but provides a more secure and comfortable fit.

The IPD (interpupillary distance) is now adjustable by moving the lenses inside the headset, allowing you to choose between three different ocular distances--58, 63, and 68mm. This is based on the distance between your pupils, and when you have it at the right setting, it produces a clear image.

Oculus revealed a line of Oculus Quest 2 accessories that can be used with the new headset. These include a $49 carrying case and $39 facial interface two-pack, the latter of which lets you switch out the face shields for narrow or wider pieces to accommodate different face sizes. There's also an Elite strap for $49 that improves the Quest 2's weight balance and ergonomics; you can also get the Elite strap with a built-in battery and carrying case for $129. And of course, the $79 Oculus Link cable--which has been available for some time--is also compatible with the Quest 2.

Third parties like Logitech have also created some accessories for the Quest 2, including the company's G333 VR in-ear headphones for $50 and the over-ear G Pro gaming headset for $100. VR Cover has also made a new facial interface that improves airflow and decreases the fogging of lenses--you can snag it for $29.

If you're interested in learning more about the new VR headset, check out our Oculus Quest 2 review. There were also a lot of Oculus Quest 2 games revealed today, including games in the Assassin's Creed and Splinter Cell universes.

Oculus Quest 2 Tech Specs

Headset:

  • Dimensions: 191.5mm x 102mm x 142.5mm (strap folded in), 191.5mm x 102mm x 295.5mm (strap fully opened up)
  • Weight: 503g
  • Tracking: Supports 6 degrees of freedom head and hand tracking through integrated Oculus Insight technology.
  • Storage: 64GB or 256GB
  • Display Panel: Fast-switch LCD
  • Display Resolution: 1832x1920 per eye
  • Display Refresh: 72Hz at launch; 90Hz support to come
  • SoC: Qualcom SnapdragonTM XR2 Platform
  • Audio: Integrated speakers and microphone; also compatible with 3.5mm headphones.
  • RAM: 6GB
  • Battery Life: You can expect between 2-3 hours based on the kind of content you’re using on Quest 2; closer to 2 hours if you’re playing games and closer to 3 hours if you’re watching media. At any point, you can check the battery status of your headset in the Oculus App settings or in VR via Oculus Home.
  • Charge Time: With the provided USB-C power adapter, Quest 2 will charge to a full battery in about 2.5 hours.
  • IPD: Adjustable IPD with three settings for 58, 63 and 68mm.

Oculus Quest 2 accessories

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BasketballFan

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Waste of money. Especially removing the OLED they literally are going backwards in some aspects.

Facebook means NOBODY should be buying this. What a terrible headset.

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NikoKun

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@basketballfan: No it's not, don't spread misinformation. The LCD screen in the Quest 2 is a MUCH better screen than what the Quest 1 had. Significantly higher resolution, as well as higher refresh rate.

The OLED screens used in Oculus headsets DO NOT run at the true-black levels OLED usually run at. They have to run it a little above black, to fix issues like black smear. So it might have been slightly darker than LCD, but not enough to care about. The LCD they're using for Quest 2 has other advantages, but neither of us are technical enough to go into details on that. Certain reviewers even say the colors on the original Quest were too over-saturated, and that the Quest 2's LCD is more realistic colors.

A Facebook login is a small price to pay, you don't even have to use Facebook, just set it all to private and don't use it for anything other than vr games.

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BasketballFan

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@NikoKun: Lol NOBODY is defending this thing but a select few. It is DOA and an insult to the VR community. I say again: this thing sucks. It is a piece of crap. Low FoV too.

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NikoKun

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@basketballfan: Virtual every single hands-on review has been positive except 1. Plenty in the VR community see the potential. What you're saying is simply wrong.

Nothing about it is crap, it's hardware that would normally cost well over $600 or more, being sold for $299. The developer of Boneworks was just said on twitter that the Quest 2's power surpasses the 2016 PC VR min-spec in some ways.

No one is saying it's FOV is low. It's got the same FOV as the first Quest. I've even seen a couple reviewers say the Quest 2's FOV was slightly increased for them. But that was probably just their imagination.

Either way it's a significant improvement over previous headsets. A better resolution than the Valve Index too.

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Slannmage

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I was banned from Facebook so I cannot use it lol. Every time I try to make a new account they somehow know even using a Proxy :/ So weird because all I did was talk about the Pakistani rape gangs in the UK and now I'm permanently banned. Facebook supports pedophilia it seems :/

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amaneuvering

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Already have mine preordered.

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BasketballFan

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@amaneuvering: oops

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warmblur

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Shame a great VR headset is locked behind a data mining company.

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NikoKun

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@warmblur: So what? This isn't anything new, or unusual, even in the gaming industry. Everything needs login accounts, and every company is collecting statistics on it's users.

If people who want Quest don't wanna use FB, they can create a bare-minimum account, and set everything to private, and not post or install FB apps on other devices. Other than gaming habits, there's not much else Facebook can get from users who do that.

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uninspiredcup

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Edited By uninspiredcup

@warmblur: Yea, I was just reading some of the stuff they can do, pretty shocking.

"Should the latter happen, Facebook is clear: You can kiss your purchased software goodbye. The same goes for anyone who enters a Facebook-branded VR social zone, like Facebook Horizons or Facebook Venues, and breaks a Facebook ToS in those spaces. (Facebook says it's still working out the kinks in these policies, in terms of whether offending users will face "30-day suspensions" and what kind of software restrictions those may entail.)

On top of those issues, my Quest 2 tests have expanded upon what Facebook previously announced in terms of how they'll moderate their Facebook-branded social spaces. Facebook Venues' beta includes a notice that the app, at all times for all users, performs a "rolling recording" of everything you see, say, and do within VR, so that you can tap a button to upload that footage and report other users' behavior. (Facebook insists this recording happens entirely locally on your device.)

Should you ever tap the "report" button, the app's terms confirm that Facebook is well within its rights to retain any data you upload for as long as they deem necessary, with no statute of limitations. A similar data-retention scenario emerges every single time you block or mute someone within VR. If a stranger approaches you and does something unwelcome, and you choose to proactively push back with built-in block or mute functions, Facebook may silently and invisibly sic a moderator upon the situation to see what happened and how you may have reacted or what you might have said or done in response.

Even worse, if someone "near" you in an official Facebook VR space blocks or reports a user, even if you're just minding your own business, your behavior (including motions and speech) may be tracked by these same silent, invisible Facebook moderators. That data can be stored on Facebook's servers indefinitely without you being notified.

If you'd like to learn whether anyone on Facebook's staff watched you within any of these apps and for how long, Facebook advises you to take off your headset and visit the catch-all URL of facebook.com/support for more information. From there, you have to figure out where exactly to file such a request. (So far, searches for Facebook Venues at that site turn up zero results.)

As we at Ars Technica know, that kind of constant data collection is a bonafide recipe for disaster. If you're looking to reduce stress on your VR apps' servers, Facebook, policies like these are a good start, because I certainly won't be using that app again."

I mean, holy shit.

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NikoKun

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@uninspiredcup: Ars Technica was blowing it out of proportion. And my god that article is written as deceptively as possible.. Complaining about the report button, lmao, or if someone reports something "near" you, in quotes like it's something evil.. Y'all are being absurd.

Obviously when you need to submit an error or harassment report, it's useful for the headset to send them debug video footage of what happened in game. It helps them fix bugs or to deal with an abusive user. I see no reason why people are worried about this. You're not gonna suddenly find yourself being spied on, just because someone near you in a game had to report someone. That's not how it works.

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warmblur

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@uninspiredcup: That's insane shit.

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deactivated-5fab1400b2fcc

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@warmblur: It’s not

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warmblur

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@thegreatchomp: Quest 2 requires you to have a FB account if you don't you can't use it so yes it is locked behind a data mining company.

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deactivated-5fab1400b2fcc

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@warmblur: FB is not a data mining company

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Divisionbell

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@thegreatchomp: It is absolutely a data mining company. How could you not know that?

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NikoKun

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@Divisionbell: So is Google, in some ways to an even greater degree than FB is.. And yet most people don't think twice about using their Android phones, loaded with everything Google, clearly tracking you. lol

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