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Feature Article

Nintendo Switch One Year Later: 5 Wii U Games That Deserve A Second Chance

A prayer for ports.

One year after launching Switch, Nintendo is enjoying its regained popularity. The console-handheld hybrid continues to fly off of shelves, and it's no doubt due to the incredible selection of games available--including the likes of Super Mario Odyssey and The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild, our (any many other websites') favorite game of 2017.

Switch's popularity has also been bolstered by great ports of some of the most popular Wii U games. We've already got Mario Kart 8 Deluxe, Pokken Tournament DX, and Bayonetta 2, but anyone familiar with the Wii U library knows that's merely scratching the surface of what's possible.

A port of Super Smash Bros. feels like a guarantee--the sort of game that stirs up a lot of excitement and attention among Nintendo's player base. Looking beyond the obvious choice, however, Nintendo could give also give RPGs like Xenoblade Chronicles X and Tokyo Mirage Sessions #FE a second chance at success, as they would benefit greatly from being made portable, let alone available on a console that people are eager fill with games.

There are plenty of games that could fit the bill, but if we were forced to pick five Wii U games to transition to Switch, we know exactly what we'd pick. Take a look at the video above for our choices and why we believe they'd be right at home on Switch. And if you have any suggestions for games we might have missed, give them a shout out in the comments below.

Got a news tip or want to contact us directly? Email news@gamespot.com

doc-brown

Peter Brown

Peter is Managing Editor at GameSpot, and when he's not covering the latest games, he's desperately trying to recapture his youth by playing the classics that made him happy as a kid.
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