Nintendo Smartphone Games May "Feel Different," New Loyalty Program Teased

"Doing things differently isn't something we shy away from."

26 Comments

Nintendo of American president Reggie Fils-Aime has shed more light on two of the company's most exciting upcoming projects: smartphone games and My Nintendo, the company's new loyalty program.

Speaking with Time Magazine, Fils-Aime reiterated that Nintendo does not plan to simply port its games to smartphones. Instead, the company wants to make "new compelling experiences that leverage what smart devices do best." He went on to say that Nintendo's smartphone games "may feel different," but explained why you shouldn't worry about that.

No Caption Provided

“So what we've been working at is development of apps that feature Nintendo IP in a meaningful way for mobile platforms," he explained. "We understand that this may feel different. And that's OK. Doing things differently isn't something we shy away from. And we're confident we can deliver 'surprise and delight' within the profile of mobile devices just as well as we do with dedicated portables or home consoles."

Nintendo's first smartphone game is Miitomo, which was previously expected to launch this year but is now scheduled to arrive in 2016. You can read more about it here. A total of five smartphone games from Nintendo are due to launch by 2017.

Also in the interview, Fils-Aime talks more about My Nintendo. He says Nintendo's goal for the My Club replacement is to have it serve as a single hub that tracks all of your interactions with Nintendo, whether that be through games or an amusement park.

"What's different with My Nintendo, is that My Nintendo is meant to be the virtual hub for all of your consumer interactions with Nintendo IP," he explained. "Meaning playing a smart device app from Nintendo, it recognizes that you've done that and you'll be rewarded for that activity. Purchase games for our dedicated game systems, My Nintendo will know, you'll be rewarded for that activity. Play games, watch videos, conceptually go to Universal Studios, the thought process is that this is a more robust and sticky way for you as a consumer to interact with all things Nintendo, for it to be tracked, and then for you to be rewarded for all that activity."

Given My Nintendo's "much larger vision," Nintendo needed to say goodbye to Club Nintendo.

"[My Nintendo] is tremendously ambitious," he said. "It is something where we're trying to take a very complicated concept and simplify it as much as we can. But that's why we had to make the transition from one program into something that's very different in execution."

Are you looking forward to Nintendo's new smartphone games and My Nintendo? Let us know in the comments below!

Got a news tip or want to contact us directly? Email news@gamespot.com

Join the conversation
There are 26 comments about this story