Nintendo Issues Statement on Amiibo Stock in America and Europe [UPDATE]

Corporation responds to retailer claiming some figurines are sold out for good.

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Update: Nintendo of America issued the following statement, similar to that of NOE:

"Some amiibo were very popular at launch, and it is possible that some amiibo in the United States, Canada and Latin America may not be available right now due to high demand and our efforts to manage shelf space during the launch period. Certain sold-out amiibo may return to these markets at a later stage. We are continually aiming to always have a regular supply of amiibo in the marketplace and there are many waves of amiibo to come."

So, it's not a confirmation of any Amiibo being discontinued, but it's also not a promise that they will bring sold-out figures back.

The original story appears below.

Nintendo Europe will continue to resupply Amiibo stock that has sold out, the corporation has told GameSpot, following rumors that some of the new toys have been discontinued already.

However, the issue is complicated because representatives for Nintendo of America have said, and later denied, that it will no longer manufacture some of the highly sought figurines.

Confusion surrounding the supply of Amiibo began when an independent Canadian games retailer, Video Games Plus, claimed on Twitter that Nintendo "has officially discontinued Marth, Wii Fit Trainer, & Villager Amibos."

"Sorry folks these are gone forever," the retailer wrote.

A purported Nintendo executive claimed that "we have not discontinued any of the Amiibo figures."

However, when questioned on the matter, a representative for Nintendo of America said that "due to shelf space constraints, other figures likely will not return to the market once they have sold through their initial shipment."

While sill not totally clear or adamant, Nintendo of Europe has issued a statement to GameSpot, which reads:

"Nintendo of Europe would like to confirm that supplies of Amiibo are currently available in the European market. Amiibo have been very popular at launch and as such it's always possible that a few retailers may have sold out. We are continually aiming to always have a regular supply of Amiibo brought into the marketplace and there are many waves of Amiibo to come."

Note that they're not saying individual Amiibo will never be discontinued, but they do offer the clarity that no Amiibo are currently off the market.

Amiibo figurines are plastic miniatures of some of Nintendo's most iconic characters. With built-in NFC technology, these toys can will interact with certain Nintendo games in various ways, such as transferring gameplay data. The first Nintendo game set to support Amiibo is Super Smash Bros for Wii U, and Nintendo has now revealed an initial list of other games that will support the toys in some form. They are:

Currently, 2DS, the 3DS, and the 3DS XL do not support Amiibo technology, which is why Nintendo is set to release a new version of the handheld with NFC capability built in. This system is already available in Japan.

For a further look at the Amiiibo figures, take a look in the gallery below:

Click the images below to view in gallery
Click the images below to view in gallery
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Click on the thumbnails below to view in gallery
Click on the thumbnails below to view in gallery
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An earlier version of this story reversed the timeline for statements from Nintendo. It has since been corrected.

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