New World's Massive Launch Is Causing Server Issues And Long Login Queues

Amazon is looking to address server issues as New World soars past half a million concurrent players.

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New World, Amazon Game Studios' long delayed MMO, is finally live, and it has quickly become the #2 game on Steam with more than 700,000 concurrent players and counting. Unfortunately, that also means server issues and long login queues for many players looking to dive in.

Most of the game's North American and European servers are currently at "High" population counts, with a few still at "Medium" population. Amazon says it is looking into the problems and wants to get everyone into the game. Some on Reddit have said they're even getting kicked out of the queues themselves, send back to the very end of the line and forced to wait several more hours.

Another update on September 28 also mentioned that more servers will come online in order to expand the capacity for the game, and that the "sole focus" for the team is to make sure players can log in quickly.

The game is also seeing massive popularity on Twitch, which is owned by Amazon. As of late Tuesday, there were more than 900,000 people watching New World on the platform, and those watching certain channels and who link their Steam accounts can earn Twitch drops for in-game items.

New World's launch comes after multiple delays and beta periods. The game was originally set to release in spring of 2020, before being delayed three more times. A closed beta period for the game earlier this year saw more than 200,000 concurrent players.

Amazon has a lot riding on New World. The company's previous game, the free-to-play hero shooter/battle royale Crucible, failed to find any kind of audience, and was canceled a few months after release. A planned Lord of the Rings MMO from the studio was also canceled.

Amazon Game Studios vice president Christoph Hartmann recently said New World would be the game that proved what the studio was capable of, and if the game's launch is any indication, it seems like Amazon's investment in the game space may soon start paying off.

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