Museum opens 15,000-piece game exhibit

Gamers are as guilty as any other crowd when it comes to obsessively hoarding anything related to their interests. However, pretty much everyone's game collection looks a bit smaller today, given that the Strong National Museum of Play announced its National Center for the History of Electronic...

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Gamers are as guilty as any other crowd when it comes to obsessively hoarding anything related to their interests. However, pretty much everyone's game collection looks a bit smaller today, given that the Strong National Museum of Play announced its National Center for the History of Electronic Games collection. The 15,000-piece collection features every major gaming console manufactured since 1972, ranging from the Magnavox Odyssey to the Nintendo Wii, as well as more than 100 handheld devices.

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According to Strong National Museum of Play representatives, the collection includes more than just hardware and software, extending into the realms of "packaging, advertising, publications, electronic-game-inspired consumer products, literary and popular inspirations of electronic-games imagery, historical records, personal and business papers, and other associated artifacts." The exhibit also includes 10,000 games, from Atari Space Invaders to Wii Sports.

"Electronic games are not only changing the way we play; they are having a profound effect on the way we learn and the way we interact with each other," said museum president and CEO G. Rollie Adams. "Because Strong National Museum of Play is dedicated to exploring the role of play in American life, we are especially interested in the growing impact that electronic games have on it. The National Center for the History of Electronic Games is the museum's mechanism for collecting games and related artifacts and documentation; and for interpreting them through exhibits, publications, and other means."

The National Center for the History of Electronic Games collection is housed at the Strong National Museum of Play in Rochester, New York. More information on the museum is available through its Web site.

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