Microsoft providing advance returns for broken Xbox One consoles

If you're having any serious issues with your new Xbox One, Microsoft will send you a replacement before you ship your broken console back.

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After waiting such a long time for the new line of consoles to launch, having a busted system out of the box can be a real disappointment. Fortunately, Xbox One purchasers who are experiencing any problems, particularly the grinding disc drive issue popping up on a number of YouTube videos, won't have to wait long to get back in the action. Microsoft is using their advance return system to allow gamers to receive a console prior to shipping back a broken system for service.

Regarding the disc issue, Microsoft issued the following statement to GameSpot:

“The issue is affecting a very small number of Xbox One customers. We’re working directly with those affected to get a replacement console to them as soon as possible through our advance exchange program. Rest assured, we are taking care of our customers.

Customers have the option for us to send a replacement console right away without waiting until they have returned their old one. This means a customer only has to wait a matter of days, rather than weeks to get back up and running.”

For anyone experiencing any issues with their console, whether its hardware or service related, Microsoft recommends the following steps:

  • Talking to a live customer support person that can call you back if you don't want to wait
  • Xbox.com for support pages and forums
  • On Twitter with @XboxSupport
  • Using Help and diagnostics on the console by saying "Xbox Help"

Like the PlayStation 4, the Xbox One launch has gone smoothly with relatively few customers reporting issues that keep them from enjoying their new game systems. However, it's important to keep in mind that, since both the Xbox One and PlayStation 4 have sold over 1 million units , a problem with just 1% represents over 10,000 consoles. Studies have indicated previously that, for personal electronics, the average failure rate for most products within 2 years is around 15%.

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