The products discussed here were independently chosen by our editors. GameSpot may get a share of the revenue if you buy anything featured on our site.

How To Build A Gaming PC: Step-By-Step Guide (2020)

Putting together a gaming PC build can be an intimidating process, but it doesn't have to be so hard if you know what you're doing.

25 Comments

The PC is the most powerful gaming platform out there. A strong gaming computer has the potential for higher resolutions, faster frame rates, and better visuals than current consoles can even come close to achieving. It can be very tempting to build your own gaming PC, but if you don't know where to start, it can also be quite intimidating and turn you off entirely. Thankfully, it doesn't have to be that way. PCs are much easier to build than they were in the past, and while it's not as easy as putting together a Lego spaceship, you don't have to be scared of it.

That's why we've put together this straightforward guide on how to build a gaming PC. It's intended for those who are a little wary of building their first PC or just need a little refresher of the steps to doing so. We’ll cover everything from the prep phase and picking parts to the actual parts like the CPU, GPU, motherboard, CPU cooler, hard drive (and yes, of course, which SSD you should throw in there) build and beyond. Of course, due to the current pandemic, many online stores are experiencing product shortages and shipping delays that could interfere with your PC build, so be sure to check the estimated delivery date when ordering from stores like Newegg or Amazon.

Actually picking your parts can be daunting, especially when you factor in compatibility and power consumption. There are a lot of things to consider, partially because many of your components may rely on your CPU being either from Intel or AMD. Thankfully, PC Part Picker is an invaluable resource that you should absolutely refer to when building a PC. We used the website to build our rig and highly recommend using it for yours. It makes it easy to stay within your budget and lets you know if your components are compatible with each other--it'll even make suggestions if there are issues with your chosen parts.

If you're looking for some accessories to round out your new gaming rig, check out the best gaming mice, best gaming headset, best capture card for streaming, best gaming keyboard, and best budget gaming monitors.

Tools to use

Fortunately, you don't need many tools or extra parts to build your PC--almost everything you need will be included in your components' boxes. However, there are a few items you'll need to have ready before you start building your PC.

Screwdrivers:

For the vast majority of your build, you'll be using a No. 2 Phillips screwdriver, but if you're installing M.2 SSDs into your motherboard, then you'll want to use a smaller No. 1 Phillips screwdriver for that.

Flashlight:

Thankfully, nearly every smartphone on the market can be used as a flashlight, and you’ll likely need it when installing certain cables and components into your case.

Thermal paste:

You'll want a tube of thermal paste to keep your CPU's temperature low during use. Most CPU coolers come with thermal paste already applied, which means you won't need any extra. However, if you do end up buying a tube of thermal paste, you can clean the cooler's paste off and use your own.

Terms to know

We've attempted to simplify the process of building a gaming PC as much as possible here, but if you're not familiar with PC hardware, some of the terms in this guide may need some clarification. We've briefly explained some of the parts and terminology we'll be using below. Feel free to reference this section as you work on your build.

GPU: GPU stands for graphics processing unit; another name for a graphics card. This will handle displaying images on your PC. The more elaborate and complex these images are, the more power you'll need from your graphics card. The two big names in the graphics card game are Nvidia and AMD.

CPU: The CPU (central processing unit, also known as a processor) handles all of the processes and calculations on your PC. For your PC, you'll choose a CPU from either Intel or AMD.

Motherboard: The motherboard is where all of the components are installed, allowing them to work together and perform their functions properly.

SATA: SATA is a type of connection, like USB, that is used for hard drives and SSDs to transfer data

PCIe: PCIe is another type of connection, though it's most commonly used for graphics cards and M.2 SSDs

NVMe: NVMe is a type of connection protocol that can be supported by M.2 SSDs. This provides much faster access to saving and accessing data.

M.2 SSD: An M.2 SSD is a small stick that provides your PC with storage space. You can get a SATA-based M.2 SSD or a PCIe-based M.2 SSD, the latter of which can support NVMe.

RAM: The RAM (or random access memory) is used to store data and information that is being processed by the CPU. The more RAM you have--paired with a good-quality processor--the faster your PC can perform its various functions.

Cooling system: The cooling system is used to protect the CPU from overheating.

PSU: The PSU (or power supply) supplies your PC and its various components with power.

OS: OS stands for operating system. Most gaming PCs will utilize Windows 10--it's what we suggest--though some people may want to install Linux.

A look at some gaming PC builds

We've included a breakdown of our recommended PC build alongside a much more affordable gaming PC build. This should give you an idea of the vast price range you can expect when starting to build your first PC. More expensive PC builds will absolutely rock your bank account, but they're more likely to be future-proofed--you won't need to upgrade the PC's components for quite some time, and when you do, you likely won't need to upgrade more than your graphics card. The cheaper PCs can still provide an excellent experience at a much more affordable price, but you may need to upgrade it more often if you want to keep up with new releases. Either way, you're sure to have a fantastic gaming experience, as long as you keep your expectations in check with your budget. Keep in mind that many a PC build these days lacks an optical drive (since actual disk usage is rare nowadays), but you always add one later if you need one.

Our gaming PC build

Exact price: $2,835

$1,000 gaming PC build

Exact price: $958

How to build a gaming PC

Step 1: Prepare your motherboard

Parts used: Motherboard

No Caption Provided

Assembling the motherboard outside of the case will make your whole experience much easier to deal with. Our general rule of thumb is to install as many parts as possible before screwing it into your case. An important thing to note before starting on your motherboard is that you should refer to its manual as often as possible, as your specific motherboard may suggest specific ways or places to install your components. Also, keep in mind that certain parts will require some force when plugging them in, while others simply just need to be placed into their respective spots. Please pay close attention to the following instructions before installing your components.

The first thing you'll want to do is make sure you're assembling your PC on a flat surface. Don't build it on a carpet--the mixture of static electricity and your PC's parts is a dangerous combination and could cause damage to your components. It's unlikely to happen, but we still suggest touching your metal case from time to time to help ground yourself and avoid this from happening.

Instead, build your rig in a room with hardwood or laminate floors like a dining room or kitchen--we even went the extra mile and took our socks off. Take your motherboard out of its packaging and then place it on a flat surface. You can lay it directly on your table, but we personally placed it on top of its box to avoid scratching our desk. At this point, you're ready to start.

Step 2: Install the CPU

Parts used: CPU, motherboard

No Caption Provided

The easiest part of your entire build is also the first: installing our AMD Ryzen CPU. Your motherboard's CPU socket will be protected by a piece of plastic, which you'll be able to remove when you open the tray. All you need to do is gently push down on the tray's metal arm and pull it out. Once it's free of the tray, lift it up to open the socket and the protective plastic will fall out. Be sure to keep this plastic piece in case of any issues with your motherboard, as you'll need to reinsert it before sending it back to the manufacturer.

At this point, your CPU socket tray should be open, allowing you to install your CPU on to your motherboard. Your CPU should have some small half-circle indents in its board. The CPU socket is designed to fill these indents, making it easy to line up your CPU and install it properly. Once you've figured out how to place your CPU into its socket, do so gently. Do not apply pressure directly on the CPU--simply close the tray and make sure the metal arm is locked into its original position, which may require a bit of force.

Step 3: Install M.2 SSD(s)

Parts used: M.2 SSD(s), motherboard

No Caption Provided

M.2 SSDs are another easy step in the process, but don't forget to reference your manual to find out which M.2 slots you should use first. Your motherboard may have protective thermal guards on your M.2 slots, so remove those first. Once you've taken any guards off the motherboard, you can slot in your M.2 SSDs. These require a little bit of force to slot into their respective slots, but don't push too hard--they should slide in quite easily. Once the M.2 SSDs are in their slots, the opposite end should be pointing upward at a diagonal angle. At this point, you take the respective screw (that is often included with your motherboard), push each M.2 SSD down, and screw them into the appropriate spots. At this point, you can take the thermal guard and place it on top of each M.2 SSD, screwing it back into place.

Step 4: Install the RAM

Parts used: RAM, motherboard

No Caption Provided

This is another step where you'll want to reference your motherboard's manual, which should be able to tell you which order to place the RAM in. If you have four slots and only two sticks of RAM, then you should make sure the two sticks are spaced apart in either the first and third slot or second and fourth--your motherboard manual can advise you here. Placing your RAM apart like this will help you get the most out of your CPU. First off, be sure to flip down the plastic clips on both sides of each slot you plan on using. Inserting the RAM requires more force, but make sure you start small and then ramp up your pressure gradually. When you hear a click, your RAM is in its slot. This should cause the plastic clips to flip up, gripping your RAM. If you notice your clips haven't flipped up, then your RAM may not be seated properly.

Step 5: Get your case ready for your motherboard

Parts used: Case

No Caption Provided

It's almost time to throw your motherboard into your case, but first you'll need to screw in some standoff screws that you'll place your motherboard onto before screwing it in. These standoffs will come with your motherboard, and once you've located them, you can start screwing them into your case. There should be about a dozen holes for the standoffs to fit into. Refer to your case's manual if you're having trouble finding them. Once the standoffs are screwed in, you're ready to insert your motherboard.

Step 6: Install your motherboard into your case

Parts used: Motherboard, case

No Caption Provided

The standoffs make it easy to place your motherboard into your case, but don't start screwing it in straight away. There should be a space on the back of your case for your motherboard's I/O ports to fit into. It'll be a rectangle, and you'll want your motherboard to be inserted comfortably into this space so that you can access all of the ports. Once everything fits, you can start screwing your motherboard onto the standoffs with the appropriate screws. Don't forget that you don't want to screw anything too tightly. Just turn your screwdriver until everything is securely tightened, and then you're ready to move on.

Step 7: Install your power supply (PSU)

Parts used: Power supply, case, motherboard

No Caption Provided

Installing the power supply into your case is often quite easy. You'll want to refer to your specific case's manual for this, but it's pretty straightforward. First, we took our case's mounting bracket and screwed it onto the back of our power supply. You'll notice your power supply also sports a fan, which is used to circulate air. If you're planning on placing your finished gaming PC on a hardwood floor or desk, then feel free to aim this fan downward; if you're placing your gaming PC on a carpeted floor, then you'll want to aim the fan upward.

Once you've figured out which way your PSU needs to be oriented, and screwed on the mounting bracket, you can easily slide it into your case and tighten the bracket's screws. Depending on how much room you have for your PSU, you may want to hold off on screwing it in until you've plugged in all of its various power cables.

Step 8: Connect any SATA hard drives/SSDs

Parts used: SATA drives, case, power supply

No Caption Provided

Now that the power supply is installed, you can start connecting any SATA hard drives or SSDs. Your case should have a specific bay area dedicated to holding these kinds of drives. Locate this area, then look for two metal clasps on the left and right side of each bay. Squeeze these clasps and then pull the bay out. Here is where you'll be able to screw in your SATA drive and keep it stable inside your case. Once this is done, you'll want to reinsert the bay into its place, and then plug a SATA and PSU cable into your hard drive. Find the SATA slot on your motherboard and plug the other side of the appropriate cable into it, then plug the other side of the PSU cable into your power supply. Your drive is now installed, though you will need to format it once your PC is up and running.

Step 9: Plug your case and power cables into the motherboard

Parts used: Case, power supply, motherboard

No Caption Provided

Now, you're ready to start plugging cables into your motherboard. This part requires some patience, as your case cables are extremely tiny and can be difficult to orient. You'll want to reference both your case and motherboard manuals during this step. Some motherboards, like our Aorus Ultra, come with a bus that you can plug the case cables into before inserting them into the motherboard. This makes this step much easier.

Your case cables make it so you can use the various ports on the front of your PC in addition to the power button itself. Of course, nothing is going to happen when you press that button if you don't plug your PSU into your motherboard. You'll want to plug the 24-pin ATX and EPS12V cables into their respective spots on both the motherboard and PSU. You'll be plugging in all of your power cables into the PSU, including fans, SATA drives, and your cooling system.

Step 10: Install your CPU cooling system

Parts used: Cooling system, CPU, motherboard

No Caption Provided

Installing your cooling system can be a somewhat nerve-wracking experience, particularly when applying the thermal paste, but it's a lot easier than it sounds. The first thing you need to do is mount the system's bracket to the motherboard. You'll need access to the back of the motherboard tray, as you'll be screwing part of it to the back of the tray. This'll give you the spots you need to set the cooler's pump onto your CPU and motherboard. Before you do this, however, there are a few other steps.

Liquid-based CPU cooling systems come with a radiator equipped with fans, which you'll want to screw into your case. Of course, you'll need to figure out where you want to install it. We recommend screwing it into your case's top grill, as it'll allow for more airflow, but some cases may not have a top grill, and you'll need to install it on the back of the case. Once you figure out what position you're going to go with, you'll screw the radiator into the grill itself. Once you're done this, you're ready to attach the pump.

First, you'll want to apply some thermal paste. Some coolers come with thermal paste already applied; if that’s the case, your cooler’s thermal paste is most likely capable of handling the job, and you may be able to skip this next step. You can also easily remove the cooler’s paste with a dry cloth if you bought thermal paste you’d rather go with. You'll want to apply a pea-sized glob of thermal paste into the center of your CPU. During this step, always go smaller than bigger. Once applied, you can press the cooler into its position on the CPU and thermal paste. If you feel like you've accidentally applied too much thermal paste, don't worry: It's as easy as wiping the CPU off with a dry cloth and rubbing alcohol and trying again.

Once the pump is installed, you'll want to make sure all of your cooling system's wires are plugged into the right spots. Our particular cooler required us to plug a micro-USB cable into our pump and the other side into our motherboard.

Step 11: Start cable management

Parts used: Case

Before we move on to the last step of physically building your PC, you may want to do some cable management to clean up. This'll create some room for air circulation and accessing your components if you ever want to upgrade later. Most cases come with Velcro straps or zip ties, but I always keep a bag of Velcros on hand just in case. The case we went with, Fractal's Meshify C, includes an awesome area for cable management that's equipped with a series of Velcro straps. It's located on the back of the motherboard tray. We were able to slide all of our cables into this space and keep it all fastened up nicely.

The only zip ties we used were for our CPU cooling system's wires, which were thin and plentiful. This made it easier for us to orient them through the holes in our case to reach our desired spot. Just make sure you don't over-tighten your zip ties as doing so could damage your cables.

Step 12: Install your graphics card

Parts used: Graphics card, motherboard

No Caption Provided

Finally, it’s time to discuss the component you're probably the most excited about. The graphics card is easy to install. First, you'll need to remove an appropriate number of expansion slot inserts from the back of your case to fit your graphics card. This will vary depending on which GPU you go with, but two is usually the safe number--our MSI GeForce RTX 2080 Ti takes up two. Once you unscrew and remove them, figure out which PCIe Express slot you'll need to insert your card into, then flip its plastic notch at the far end of the slot downward to prepare for installation. At this point, all you need to do is line up the graphics card with the PCIe Express slot and then push down until the plastic notch flips up and clicks. Again, you don't need a lot of force to push it in, but you will need to push the graphics card into its slot until you get that click. Once you hear that, you can screw your graphics card's mounting brackets into the case using the expansion slot's screws and holes.

At this point, you need to plug your graphics card into your power supply to give it power. (Low-end graphics cards don’t typically require extra power, so if that’s what you’re working with, you’re good to skip this step.) Take the appropriate cables included with your power supply and plug one end into the graphics card; then, plug the other into the PSU. It's okay if there are parts of the cables that go unused--just make sure every port on the graphics card has part of the cable plugged in.

Step 13: Install your OS

Parts used: USB thumb drive, case

No Caption Provided

Once you've ensured a tidy PC with all of your cables managed, you should connect an HDMI cable to your PC and plug the other end into a monitor. Plug the power cable into your PSU and the other end into an outlet; then, flip the power switch on the back of your PC to its "On" position. Press the power button on your PC, and if it turns on, you're almost good to go.

At this point, you'll need another PC and a fast USB drive of at least 8GB--we suggest the SanDisk Extreme Pro. You'll then want to head over to Microsoft and follow the steps provided there. This will help you create an installation device out of your USB drive, which you can plug into your PC before booting it up. Upon starting your PC, it should go straight into the Windows 10 installation process. Follow the steps here and wait for it to install. Once you're done, you should be good to go, though you will need to buy a proper license for Windows 10 from Microsoft. If you do this from your new PC, it'll activate automatically. On this is all setup, you're good to go, barring the installation of an optical drive, if you chose to get one.

If your PC doesn't turn on

If your PC doesn't boot, don't worry: It's certainly not the end of the world. There are a number of things that can cause a PC to not boot up on your first try, and save for any product malfunctions, they're easily solvable. Here are a few things you can do to troubleshoot your powerless PC.

Is the power supply plugged into an outlet?

This is a simple fix. Just plug your PC into an outlet, and you should be good to go.

Is the power supply's switch turned on?

Make sure you've flipped your PSU's switch into the 'On' position before powering on. This is an easily overlooked issue with a solution that's just as easy.

Are your power supply cables seated in the motherboard properly?

This is the next thing you should double-check. Reconnecting the cables could be what you need to finally deliver power to your PC.

Are your case's cables plugged into your motherboard properly?

It's important to get this step right because if you push your case's power button and its specific cable isn't plugged in correctly, it won't be able to start your PC. Some motherboards come with a serial bus that you can plug your case's cables into before connecting to your motherboard.

Are your parts installed correctly?

This is the last thing to check as it can be the most time-consuming. Reconnecting your RAM and CPU or simply switching the RAM sticks into different slots could be the solution you're looking for.

If all this fails, then your components may be defective.

Unfortunately, this can happen. Sometimes when building a PC, you realize that one of your components isn't working correctly. At this point, you'll need to contact the manufacturer of your part and ask them about their return policy. The vast majority of big PC component manufacturers have return policies that will cover defective parts, so you don't have to worry. It just might take a little longer to enjoy your brand-new gaming computer.

Got a news tip or want to contact us directly? Email news@gamespot.com

Join the conversation
There are 25 comments about this story
25 Comments  RefreshSorted By 
GameSpot has a zero tolerance policy when it comes to toxic conduct in comments. Any abusive, racist, sexist, threatening, bullying, vulgar, and otherwise objectionable behavior will result in moderation and/or account termination. Please keep your discussion civil.

Avatar image for rubensio
Rubensio

1

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 0

User Lists: 5

Nice!

Upvote • 
Avatar image for jsprunk
JSprunk

1685

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 5

User Lists: 5

I’m planning to spend at least $1800 on my gaming PC this year. That GTX 1660 is a pile of junk and so is the Ryzen 5 3600.

Upvote • 
Avatar image for jenovaschilld
jenovaschilld

2986

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 0

User Lists: 0

This guide is fine, and a good start, you will definitely want to check out other resources on pc building guides and videos. And a parts list closest to your budget. Starting out, do not go for the cheapest build for your buck possible- go with mainstream quality brands, freq used parts, and dependable parts. FIRST. You may want a crazy case or mobo to stand out, but I would go with simplistic and reliable, as you can always resale, reuse, redo a pc build later on.

One more word of advice- DO NOT BUILD ANYTHING RIGHT NOW- the inflated prices around the world on electronics good is just too high, 25+% on just about everything has gotten all parts higher then they should be. If you can possibly wait till winter, do so. IF something cost 100$ jan 2020 it now costs 125, 1000 now 1250+ - the inflation is similar to the ram factory shortages and bitcoin inflation during 2017-2018. Tolstoy-“The two most powerful warriors are patience and time.”

Upvote • 
Avatar image for xantufrog
xantufrog

13756

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 2

User Lists: 5

Edited By xantufrog  Moderator

I don't understand all the tough-guy comments here. I've been building PCs since DOS and 1) tech is always changing; I need updates and 2) people who want to get into PC gaming need a place to start, and something to take the mystery away from it.

Are there "better" resources out there for PC builds? Sure, why not. But there's no reason a PC gamer shouldn't write a guide like this. Which is what happened. The article is fine, and especially for a site with a strong console-gaming focus (as some below argue) it seems like a useful article to publish, not the opposite.

Jeez - nitpick nitpick nitpick

2 • 
Avatar image for Spartan_418
Spartan_418

3609

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 3

User Lists: 0

How about don't build a PC right now and waste $ on 2018 parts when the RTX 3000 series graphics cards are only a couple months away.

Upvote • 
Avatar image for lonesamurai00
lonesamurai00

1023

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 0

User Lists: 5

Edited By lonesamurai00

Please, who do you think you're fooling Gamespot?

This article from a website that specializes in nothing but console gaming. Do yourself a favor and get help from the likes of AnandTech, Tom's Hardware, TweakTown, PC Gamer, hell anywhere but this site. Gamespot has tried for so long to understand PC Gaming but still doesn't.

3 • 
Avatar image for santinegrete
santinegrete

4517

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 43

User Lists: 0

Man how much the atx cases have changed. I'm still using my old one because every penny just goes to hardware, and I missed the redesign that puts slots for SSDs (have to purchase a modular one) and the PSU goes downside but still back.

Upvote • 
Avatar image for jenovaschilld
jenovaschilld

2986

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 0

User Lists: 0

Edited By jenovaschilld

@santinegrete: For gamers, every penny should to go toward hardware, and cases as after thoughts. But there have been several advances in cases over the last few years that should be noted and thought of for your next build. For me it is :

- dust collectors for pos + pressure builds vs negative or which ever you prefer. No more rats nest of dust covering your hardware.

- Having your power supply on the bottom, in stead of top, and air flow fresh from the bottom is one of the best ways to exhaust heat and should be the standard from now on.

- separate partitions for PS, HDDs, and better wiring on the back side have not only cleaned everything up aesthetically but also produces better temps.

- new cases have much better options for water and air cooling. 90mm case fans are no longer standard size, and room for 240mm water cool exhaust is almost common now.

-Much better and easier fan speed controllers, painted interior cases, losing the CD_Rom drive/ optical, and I am loving mini and micro atx. oh and mesh screening for better airflow. Front buttons and ports are tens times better .

Some things I do not like, please tone the LEDs- down some, cases are looking like something my little pony would shit out. And tempered glass is gorgeous but it is killing airflow. One side is all that is needed, micro mesh designs are gorgeous now.

Also prices are -well were good- not a great time to build a pc- wait a year. Before you could get some great choices in the 60-100$ range that would fit anybody or build.

3 • 
Avatar image for santinegrete
santinegrete

4517

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 43

User Lists: 0

@jenovaschilld: thanks for the notes, really encourages me to finally get rid of this can of sardines. BTW I'm overwhelmed by those RGB leds too, I'm a practical and I want all my money to go to performance and QoL. I'm trying to replace the Ryzen 5 1500x eventually but I don't know if I have to wait for AM4+, if it ever happens :D (They said AM4 will be good until this year).

Upvote • 
Avatar image for jenovaschilld
jenovaschilld

2986

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 0

User Lists: 0

@santinegrete: A ryzen 1500 x will not bottleneck you just yet. And any am4 mobo will do you just fine, now and years later. I would say a ryzen (X)500 will run any game at 1080p to 2k and any (X)600 at 2k-4k, as the 600s are around $150 -170 range atm. They are more then capable of running any 8gb gpu without bottleneck and even your heavy strategy games will do fine, even with streaming.

Here is a decent case at $50 https://www.newegg.com/black-cooler-master-masterbox-q300l-micro-atx/p/N82E16811119331, with great air flow, design and the micromesh looks great lit up.

Me and some friends have been using cheap leds strips like these, amazon led strip $16 with remote. Using a molex as your 12 volt instead. They last for several years. Deryn lined the back edge of the mobo, and underside of metal frame near the near glass and front panels. These LEDs were not visible but shown light on all the parts, mesh, and offered a glow that was subtle and interesting, instead of garish. The purple, white and breathing color change looked best.

I cannot stress though, as this worldwide pandemic has shot up prices, and new gens of tech around the corner, in a year or two the prices will drop like a rock and it will be similar to how prices dropped after the 2017 bitcoin inflation, as 2018-2019 parts were a steal.

Upvote • 
Avatar image for pillarrocks
pillarrocks

1740

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 32

User Lists: 0

I always wanted to join the PC Master Race. Sounds expensive looking at the cost of parts. But I have to ask if you build your own gaming PC in 2020. Then how often would you have to upgrade it like say 10 to 20 years from now?

Upvote • 
Avatar image for jenovaschilld
jenovaschilld

2986

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 0

User Lists: 0

@pillarrocks: I build PCs to last for 8-10 years. With this in mind you need to do some research in not only motherboards, processors but also tech you know will still be relevant. That also means, super high end builds and super economic builds may not be the wisest choices as technology can not only pass you by but worse, become obsolete and not allow you any paths to upgrade parts down the road.

Ive built PCs since 98' and rarely upgrade them or harvest them. After they become old, I end up giving them away, trading them, or putting them to a simple use. Like I keep an old windows 98 2nd edition, just to do taxes on at work, because the software is obsolete. My 2011 main gaming pc is now my work pc, and my current 2018 build is still able to play most any game on ultra settings, with plenty of room to grow.

But lets be honest, consoles are the best bang for your buck as far as technology per dollar goes. They are greatly subsidized, and its standard architecture allows for great looking and playing games for many many years. But PC platform does offer a different environment for your gaming that is wondrous and frustrating also.

But if you build your own PC, you can save a ton of money then buying one off the shelf or having someone else build it. I price my built via power pc, for the similar parts at a $1600 build, but only had $800 in parts through carefully buying and building it all myself. I may upgrade a few things if needed, after a few years, or just build a brand new one if the competition offers better prices. And also high end gaming pc is not a hobby for most, and if you have a family/kids, money is better spent on braces and life insurance then that one or two extra framers per second.

3 • 
Avatar image for santinegrete
santinegrete

4517

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 43

User Lists: 0

@pillarrocks: I suggest you upgrade your mid-high end PC every 2-3 years. There's some pre-owned/used market sometimes to hardware that is not so old and still decent, you can make your old hardware sales get some money to help you to get the new parts. This way you can also avoid that your hardware suddendly dies, you can't sell fried hardware ;)

Upvote • 
Avatar image for Art3Zero
Art3Zero

149

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 2

User Lists: 0

Edited By Art3Zero  Online

@pillarrocks: It depends on how picky you are about visuals. If you built a new rig today for 1000-1200 usd, you could play games on max settings for 5 to 10 years until a few new games recommend a better CPU/GPU. And even then you could upgrade your CPU/GPU after those 10 years to stay back on top. In my opinion it's extremely worth it. The best games are generally on PC and a PC is so much more than a gaming rig.

Upvote • 
Avatar image for systemoverload
SystemOverload

626

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 0

User Lists: 0

Edited By SystemOverload

No such thing as a Gaming PC or anything really special about it.

A PC is a PC whether you decide to use it for it’s intended purpose, productivity or just to play video games.

The gaming PC or gamer PC is just a marketing ploy.

Upvote • 
Avatar image for xantufrog
xantufrog

13756

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 2

User Lists: 5

Edited By xantufrog  Moderator

@systemoverload: I can tell you don't work with computers on a professional level. No PC is the same (barring the exact same hardware and software base of course) and it certainly can and should be tuned to your application.

The fact that you can use any PC for gaming* doesn't actually make your point - "No such thing as a Gaming PC" on that logic is like saying "no such thing as a Pickup Truck" because you can shove shit in the back of almost any car. Sounds nonsenical - obviously the machine is different from its physical configuration to mechanics and feature set. There's a reason cars and trucks come in so many form factors and configurations - they can all largely be used for most of the same purposes but it doesn't mean one configuration is concurrently the right choice for all of those purposes.

I have workstations configured with multi-CPU setups, I use GPU servers for machine learning, I use a PC configured for gaming for gaming and a similar config for our lab's VR research, a laptop for portability, etc etc. Some are linux based, some Windows. They are all PCs of course, but they are configured to excel at their purposes and you shouldn't stomp into the room and just declare this isn't "a thing"

*on some level - most non-gaming configured PCs are as bad or worse than a Switch for the purpose. I'm serious. You need, for example, at least an entry level gaming GPU if you want to do something besides retro-gaming and candy crush

Upvote • 
Avatar image for Spartan_418
Spartan_418

3609

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 3

User Lists: 0

@systemoverload: Alternatively, a PC being a gaming PC or not simply depends on whether or not it has a capable graphics card.

Upvote • 
Avatar image for jenovaschilld
jenovaschilld

2986

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 0

User Lists: 0

@systemoverload: ahh that is not how things work. My lawn mower is not a tractor, my truck is not a 18-wheeler. I can game on a all-in-one office dell latitude playing minecraft and solitaire, but a decent gaming PC build on a good monitor opens up worlds of possibility and entertainment.

You can build a PC for HTPC, light office work, engineering, editing, portability or for gaming. While you can do a little of each on each build, a specific build not only maximizes your dollar but gives you a better/correct tool for the intended goal.

The above is talking about a niche hobby that is beloved around the world, known as gaming PC a very real thing.

2 • 
Avatar image for systemoverload
SystemOverload

626

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 0

User Lists: 0

it's still a tractor, lawnmower or truck. Video Game consoles are specially designed with special hardware to play video games for less than a PC. Those specific PC parts are not specially designed to play video games and PC cost more and consume a lot more of energy and resources.

Just marketing.

But you can think what you like.

Upvote • 
Avatar image for lonesamurai00
lonesamurai00

1023

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 0

User Lists: 5

@systemoverload: What difference does it really make. With a console you only get better optimization in games, but only decent performance. The differences between the two platforms also matters a great deal to developers as well, since they have declared the PC platform the most important platform for making their games for the past five or six years now.

Upvote • 
Avatar image for santinegrete
santinegrete

4517

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 43

User Lists: 0

@systemoverload: like shotguns? hunting shotgun, riot shotgun, military shotgun =D=D=D

Upvote • 
Avatar image for jenovaschilld
jenovaschilld

2986

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 0

User Lists: 0

Well at least this isn't a Verge PC build guide, and for the most part it will get most new people started.

Just wanted to add one thing, with that mobo and most other mobo, if you use those m.2 ssd slots on the board and another plan to add larger TB HDD or slower SSD, etc in the sata ports - refer to the mobo manual as some means you cannot use some sata ports. And with how large games and mods are getting, I love my 2 tb seagate HDD. Because you DO NOT want to fill your ssds past 75% if possible as it will slow their performance, most anyways.

There are also better and easier videos on youtube like linus tech tips.

2 • 
Avatar image for deactivated-5efed3ebc2180
deactivated-5efed3ebc2180

923

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 1

User Lists: 0

Dear GS, please change the title "How NOT to build a gaming PC in 2020".
Stick to your little consoles please...

Upvote • 
Avatar image for daidochus
Daidochus

401

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 0

User Lists: 5

@WESTBLADE: LOOOOL

Upvote • 
Avatar image for gargungulunk
gargungulunk

695

Forum Posts

0

Wiki Points

0

Followers

Reviews: 5

User Lists: 3

/wait until Cyberpunk specs are released and buy all that gear/

Nice full guide here.

It's crazy how finicky RAM can be, the speed compatibility and the install placement are things that sneak up on a no-boot.

2 •