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Feature Article

How Mass Effect: Andromeda’s Characters Deal With Science, God (And Why That’s So Exciting)

Ryders on the Storm.

My fondest memory of the Mass Effect series is a conversation I had with Thane Krios. In a quiet corner of the Normandy's Crew Quarters he explained that his species, the Drell, believe their souls exist as separate entities from their physical bodies. For Thane, this belief allowed him to reconcile his nature as a virtuous figure with his profession as an assassin for hire; the deplorable actions of his body could not tarnish the purity of his soul. The Mass Effect series is about intergalactic politicking, mediating interspecies relationships, navigating moral dilemmas, and--of course--engaging in warfare. But it's the moments in which characters reveal something deeply personal about themselves that are the most profound.

I've always been fascinated with the series' depictions of religion, the way it leans on frameworks of faith that have parallels in real life but then creates a layer of abstraction by exploring them through alien species or relating them to existence on an intergalactic scale. These are the moments that stick with me, and in my hands-on with Mass Effect: Andromeda, it was a moment like this that I walked away thinking about the most.

Andromeda follows thousands of people from numerous species as they venture from the Milky Way galaxy to a distant world in search of a new home. For these characters, and the player, Andromeda is positioned as a journey of exploration and discovery. From a broader gameplay perspective, it's the discovery of new planets to adventure in, quest threads to follow, decisions to make, and conflicts to resolve--either through diplomacy or violence. But the theme of discovery also drives the narrative arcs of Andromeda's cast, all of whom are hoping to find something beyond a new home.

Aboard the Tempest--the ship that players will use to travel around Andromeda's Helius Cluster--I encountered one such person: Suvi. She's staring out into the the depths of space and admiring the view. To her, the distant stars and majestic planetary bodies are "a constant reminder of the divine intelligence behind all of creation."

Like Thane, Suvi reconciles two parts of her that, to outsiders, seem contradictory: she's a woman of science, but also of faith. During our conversation she reveals science brings her closer to something greater than herself. She's lived her life having to justify these beliefs and needing to prove that her faith in the divine doesn't diminish her work as a scientist.

As a person from a traditionalist Muslim family that has grown up in Western society, I couldn't help but relate to Suvi. That perceived incompatibility between faith and science has been mirrored in my own life, and Suvi expressed an idea that I've held but never been able to adequately verbalize. In that moment, I found myself remembering why I love the Mass Effect series and why I find Andromeda's potential so exciting.

After this exchange, I took the time to wander around the Tempest and speak to more of the crew joining protagonist Ryder in the search for a new "Golden World." In the engine room Gil questioned his decision to join the Andromeda Initiative but said he ultimately did so to find a purpose for himself. Similarly, Vetra, a well-connected Turian that specialises in gathering information, felt the need to justify her presence on the mission, indicating that she's dealing with issues of inadequacy and self-confidence. Jaal, who is part of the new Angara race native to the Andromeda galaxy, is an outsider trying to find footing among people from unfamiliar cultures. PeeBee, the wise-cracking Asari, refused to entertain any personal questions and outright said she has no interest in putting down roots or finding a new family in the crew of the Tempest. She bounced between happy-go-lucky, guarded, and distant.

For me, the series' strength lies in textured, layered characters offering unique perspectives that I can learn to understand--and perhaps even relate to. Based on the few hours I spent with Andromeda, it looks like there will be an abundance of them.

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Beyond the promising characters, Andromeda looks to have made a number of interesting changes to the familiar Mass Effect framework, the majority of which I was able to experience in the game's opening missions. Don't worry, there won't be any spoilers ahead.

Our search for a Golden Planet began aboard Hyperion, an Ark housing a human colony numbering 20,000 people. Player-character Ryder is awoken from cryosleep 600 years after departing from the Milky Way galaxy. As Ryder was getting her bearings, a doctor approached and gave me my first taste of the new dialogue system, which looks to address the binary nature of the series' role-playing.

It does this by asking players to select responses based on tone. In any given conversation you're presented with the option to be casual, emotional, logical, or professional, depending on the scenario. Instead of having a series of neutral probing questions and then two responses that align with either the Paragon or Renegade moral archetype, responses now represent a diverse set of emotions that shape each relationship dynamic.

For example, Cora Harper is the Pathfinder's second in command and technically Ryder's superior. When I later became the Pathfinder (despite the fact that she was better suited for the role), some tension began to grow between us. This informed the way I conducted myself around her; I opted to remain professional to prove that I was capable of handling the responsibility. For PeeBee, however, I adopted a casual tone in conversation, purely because she came across as someone that prefers to be around a leader that isn't uptight all the time.

As a result, Andromeda doesn't feel like it's funneling you down a path of good or evil. Instead, the different flavors of responses invite us to play different roles with different people and define relationships with greater nuance.

Ryder's first mission takes me to Habitat 7, a planet set to be the new Earth. However, upon my arrival it became abundantly clear that it was less than golden. In fact, Habitat 7 looked like it had been torn and twisted into something uninhabitable.

It's blue sky and sparse plant life indicated that it could have once been a new home for mankind, but it was now fraught with thunderstorms, and oxygen levels had plummeted as the atmosphere became choked in argon nitrogen. Intense magnetic activity meant that rock formations were floating in the air, and metallic inclusions attracted destructive electrical phenomena, the danger of which I experienced first-hand when a lightning bolt hit our ship and scattered my crew around the designated landing point. With only security specialist Liam Costa in tow, I began searching for the rest of the team.

The different flavors of responses invite us to play different roles with different people and define relationships with greater nuance.

Taking a page of out of Dragon Age: Inquisition's book, Mass Effect: Andromeda's planets are built to be a series of contained spaces where players explore and complete quests. Although they're not connected to form what we'd traditionally consider an open-world, each location is large enough to hold story missions, as well as side missions you can uncover and complete by venturing off the prescribed path and exploring.

To accommodate this, Ryder has been given a robust set of traversal abilities, most notably a jump and a dash enabled by a rocket pack. Ryder was also able to clamber up Habitat 7's rocky cliff faces to reach elevated areas, a skill that proved necessary to track a distress call from a teammate for a sidequest.

These abilities are also at the core of Andromeda's new combat mechanics, which I employed against the aforementioned Kett. At one point we came upon a friend who had been cornered by this unfamiliar alien race. Wearing armour made of bone and brandishing guns, they looked to be hostile but, as pointed out by Ryder, first contact protocols dictate that you cannot open fire unless fired on. Given the option to act first and talk later, I decided to let cooler heads prevail and attempted to talk to the Kett. Since they spoke an unknown language and weren't treating our friend very nicely, I had no option but to engage.

Interestingly, Ryder voiced her displeasure about how things unfolded and even made the case for the Kett feeling as threatened by us as we were by them. Andromeda makes attempts at presenting the Kett, and the mysterious Archon leading them, as figures that could also be on a journey that parallels ours. Since the portions of the game we played were devoid of necessary context, it wasn't clear what their motivations were, but I got the feeling the game doesn't want to present them as clear-cut bad guys.

In this scenario it was us versus them; the perfect opportunity to put combat through its paces. Mass Effect 3's combat serves as the foundation for the way Andromeda plays, in particular the increased freedom of movement. However, one major difference is that the role of cover has been significantly diminished. Although Ryder will automatically move into cover as you approach any appropriately large, solid object--and in fact it's often necessary to recover from damage--but between the new movement abilities, Biotic powers, and destructive weaponry, Ryder feels like a character designed to always be on the offensive.

The Kett didn't make a habit of coming out into the open, preferring to obscure themselves behind cover and quickly move between objects in the environment. As a result, I was forced to take the fight to them by leaping out of cover and launching myself into the air with a jet pack. Once airborne, I could hover long enough to aim and fire off a few shots. Ryder's dash could then be used to quickly maneuver back into cover and begin the loop again.

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While combat in previous entries in the series felt very stop-and-start--with players moving between different cover points and popping out to fire their weapons or use powers--Andromeda's skirmishes feel like they're focused on forward momentum. However, the combat's newfound energy comes at the cost of a degree of control and a layer of strategy that series fans are used to having.

Unlike previous games, you only have direct control over Ryder, and teammates can't be issued commands beyond moving to a specified location or focusing fire on a designated enemy. BioWare has also reworked how Biotic powers are implemented to ensure you aren't spending extended time in a radial wheel. Instead of having a suite of powers on an instantly accessible wheel, you have three favourites that are assigned to shortcuts so that they can quickly be employed in the heat of battle, much like in Mass Effect 3. It is possible to create four loadouts that you can switch between during battle, but given that they're two menus deep, it only makes sense to do this in order to adapt to changing battle conditions between waves, rather than as a workaround for the new system.

Another major change for Andromeda is the new freeform class system. Instead of selecting a specific role and developing a set of abilities limited to that class, you're able to learn any ability and even reassign Ryder's skill points at any time. This is a welcome change as it allows you to create unique play styles and experiment with ability combinations. Those that opt to specialise when acquiring and upgrading abilities will unlock Profiles that correspond to classes from previous games. These are used to enhance abilities by bestowing Ryder with stat bonuses. Together these changes empower the player to have greater control over the type of Ryder they develop and guide through the galaxy.

After the delays and relatively little we'd heard about Mass Effect: Andromeda, I began to worry that it may not live up to the series' legacy. And while I can't outright say I'm confident it will deliver, Andromeda's tweaks to combat and dialogue are smart. However, my passion for the Mass Effect series is tied to the connections I developed with its characters. So in the end, that personal moment with Suvi is what makes me optimistic about the series' future.

Got a news tip or want to contact us directly? Email news@gamespot.com

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Tamoor Hussain

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Mass Effect: Andromeda

Mass Effect: Andromeda

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Avatar image for lamanuwa
lamanuwa

As an engineer by trade, my enjoyment of the game came to a sudden stop when I met the Chief Science Officer and found out she is a creationist.

If you disagree with her opinions, she'll just say let's not talk about this anymore. Good idea. That's just great science fiction writing right there.

"GOD must have a plan, so why bother with science. Andromeda, here's our best scientist, she believes in creationism. That's how we roll in Milky-Way"

No dialogue option to ask her, who created the creator, either. LOL.

Avatar image for greggy713
Greggy713

I think the game is hit-and-miss and sadly lacking compared to the original trilogy. I will get it once the aforementioned patches Bioware/EA downloads come into play. It does have merit on its own with some of the characters and side-missions though the main villains are two-dimensional evolutionist cult (while I like a couple of the love interests, I wish Suvi was a romance option for a Male Ryder given her good looks and well-written character). As a stand-alone I would've called Mass Effect: Andromeda good. Following the original trilogy and the controversy, I wouldn't recommend it (yet).

On a side note, it's a shame here that the comment section is filled with triggered atheists either spewing hate, ignorant vitriol or shouting their personal excuses as to why they deny God and hate religion (I see a recurring use of the Association Fallacy in many of their comments). An announcement of ONE openly avowed religious character in the game provoked all those responses; which is quite telling of the people who say these things.

To close, if you're an atheist, or even non-Christian, let's have a civil discussion instead of slanderous rants such as "all religion is indoctrination". (regarding that accusation, religion can be used as such but not all religion is that; to take a few examples, people have come to know God in their adult years after being non-believers and there is political indoctrination. Marxism is an atheistic political ideology that people have been indoctrinated with that has caused the deaths of millions).

Avatar image for jesseyh
JesseYH

Too bad Suvi was made a lesbian though. She's the only one I find interesting at the moment. I guess my Scott Ryder is gonna have some very limited options to make human descendants with after we conquer-- I mean, colonize our own world.

Avatar image for yoshikawa12
Yoshikawa12

Wait, did the default MC is an old man?
I was avoiding any news about Andromeda but my curiosity got the best of me and open this page.

Btw that girl on the pic above look weird.

Avatar image for luzarius
luzarius

I've never seen a game with such ugly characters before. The human females look awful, like they were purposely made ugly. The Asari look ugly as hell which breaks the lore.

I'm pretty sure the SJW got to this one. I'm going to have to pass.

Avatar image for yoshikawa12
Yoshikawa12

@luzarius:

Seems they did it on purpose just like they did with DAI.

Nice catch on the Asari lore.

Avatar image for jai_86
Jai_86

Sounds like Mass Effect: Andromeda will be yet another in Bioware's arsenal of games made by theists, for theists, where theistic belief is depicted as being nothing but virtuous and special and deserving of everyone's respect no matter what. Yawn.

I had hoped they might've learned something since Dragon Age: Inquisition, which was almost insulting in its depiction of atheists as a disingenuous, ignorant, tiny minority surrounded by wise and virtuous theists of all shapes and sizes. At the very least I thought Bioware might have actually learned what atheism is since then, but looks like we're just gonna get more of the same.

I'll just have to focus on the colonizing and inter-species warfare aspect of the game when I play it.

Avatar image for runstalker
runstalker

@jai_86The beauty about science is that it's highly reproducible.

People can get into these epic theism vs. atheism discussions that go on for hours, but you can crush the point with one simple set of facts:

Take any major religion of your choosing and eliminate any and all scripture and baubles associated with it. The great gospels penned by human worshipers, the traditions and buildings and purported instruments devised by the faithful. Wipe it all from history. Clean slate.

Now do the same with science; wipe history clean of physics, gravity, biology, evolution, cosmology, you name it. Clean slate.

In due time, yet another batshit crazy religion will surely arise to replace the old one, with yet another human-penned gospel, yet more supernatural entities governing all of existence, and yet more human-devised traditions, and sermons, and rules, and buildings, and statues, and men proclaiming to be figureheads of it all.

It certainly won't be precisely the same as the other religion that was wiped clean, because there was never any inherent, universal, or reproducible truth to the human-penned production of it all. There was never anything in the environment, in nature, or in the cosmos that would immediately re-establish that eliminated religion as inherently real.

With science, on the other hand, again in due time, humans would re-discover everything just as it was originally discovered. Physics, gravity, biology, evolution, cosmology, you name it. Because it's actually there and it's reproducible, inherently ready to be proven. Because humans did not create these things. We are inherently part of this nature; evolved observers and explorers.

Wiped clean, religion crumbles under the weight of its own illusion. There's nothing absolutely real that survives and persists and returns. Wiped clean, science remains entirely intact, ready to be re-discovered.

Is it too much to ask to remain open-minded to the possibility of a superior intelligence while pursuing science and reason, without going to the trouble of creating entirely human-concocted spiritual myths about our cosmic origins?

One would have to assume that an omnipotent entity would value an honest skeptic over a bogus believer.

If none of this has changed your mind, probably because you're neck-deep in religious indoctrination from childhood reinforcement that you still haven't escaped, or maybe you still think it's at least "safe" to bet on one afterlife (like buying a ticket for the chance to win a lottery), please consider this:

What if your chosen religion is actually 60% correct - wow!, but it's 40% dead wrong, and you worship that religion's doctrine as if it were 100% correct. Had you ever considered that this presumption of total accuracy might be the single most offensive thing in all of creation for a god?

That you simply follow ancient traditions for a chance to win that lottery ticket to eternity, because it's the 'normal' or 'safe' way to fit in? That you've 'done the work' and 'invested the time' like a dutiful drone, using someone else's prayers (translated and mistranslated a dozen times over hundreds of years by authors who never knew each other), so you've been able to 'purchase' your voyage to eternity?

Had you ever considered how disgusted a god might be by these shallow, selfish, vacuous actions? The audacity of such presumption.

Yes folks, it's okay to break from your childhood religious indoctrination and open your mind. If you live a good life, are good to others and your world, that should be a pretty safe bet. You shouldn't need to lean on forgiveness of sins by some human-concocted rule system or participate in ancient rituals that contain no inherent, reproducible truth, just because someone else told you it was the right thing to do, or because you've convinced yourself that a supernatural entity is intercepting your every thought.

Your actions and your legacy are more important than your fantasies of an afterlife. Even a god would find that method of living to be more commendable than participating in these illusions of being the center of the universe, worthy of endless redemption and spiritual immortality, through the fragile and fleeting doctrine of ancient scripture from bygone eras of ignorance.

Live well-love well-learn well. Open your mind and escape from religion's dubious grasp. Your proverbial soul will not suffer. It will be set free.

:

Avatar image for Isamu_36
Isamu_36

@jai_86: I don't like being told what to believe or think.

Having said that, at least in the DA universe, it's been proved by the existence of the Veil, the demons, spirits and Darkspawn that the metaphysical and god in that universe exist.

In that universe; I can't emphasize it enough.

Anyone denying god, non-corporeal entities or magic in that context would not only be ignorant but also stubborn because the are happening in front of their bodies.

What's atheism in your own words?

Avatar image for jai_86
Jai_86

The incompatibility with science and faith is not merely 'perceived', it's factual; science is about evaluating evidence to form the most probable conclusions. The definition of 'faith' is 'belief without evidence'. Faith is an almost inverse counterpoint to science, the two are at odds with each other on a fundamental level.

People can believe in and practise both but they do so by compartmentalizing their minds, separating the part of them that thinks scientifically and the part that utilizes faith. No one can approach science from a faith-based standpoint because it's a fundamentally unscientific method of thinking and no one can approach their faith from a scientific perspective because doing so always shines an unwelcome light on faith-based beliefs.

The people who attempt to reconcile the two are at best inconsistent, at worst hypocrites.

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IanBrettCooper

"...the Drell, believe their souls exist as separate entities from their physical bodies. For Thane, this belief allowed him to reconcile his nature as a virtuous figure with his profession as an assassin for hire; the deplorable actions of his body could not tarnish the purity of his soul."

Yes, it allows him to live an immoral life and pretend he's moral. Religion often does that. That's why we need to get beyond such ridiculous delusions.

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Maroxad

Given the complete bogus science of the original Trilogy. I dont really have high hopes. Fun fact: Mass Effect was already a thing before the trilogy came out, however, it has nothing to do with relativistic or quantum mechanics, or quantum field theory.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mass_effect_(medicine)

Avatar image for connorman01
connorman01

im skeptical about this game. not getting this game right away. if the side questing is as linear and tedious as dragon age inquisition's (which it looks like it is going to be) then theres the deal breaker

Avatar image for whatsazerg
whatsazerg

Humans faith exists because we have a need to know... and because we are still ignorant to a great many things... faith/religion/god is still relevant to many people. As we learn more, and educate ourselves we understand our universe better and no longer have the need to fill in the blank with "god/s"

I have a hard time believing that someone in the time of Mass Effect Andromeda (Humans travelling to another galaxy) that anyone would still believe in a deity.

Avatar image for Maroxad
Maroxad

@whatsazerg: One thing religion is really good back is moving the goalposts. "*Insert deity here* exists beyond space and time", however, is a goalpost that I dont seeing moved any time soon, if ever.

Avatar image for someoneelse
someoneelse

@whatsazerg: well that means your close-minded. People have different views and what would be so absurd about believing there's some sort of "creator"? Nobody can answer where everything came from, it had to start somewhere/somehow.

Avatar image for ianbrettcooper
IanBrettCooper

@someoneelse: The fact that things have to start somehow does not mean a god or any sort of creator has to do it.

Avatar image for someoneelse
someoneelse

@ianbrettcooper: No sir, youre right it doesnt. But until we have the answer to that question i would think any beliefs would be "believable", wouldnt you?

Then again thats just me i have no problem with any belief and am actually interested in discussing them and perhaps the reason behind those beliefs.

Some people are hesitant to talk about them because often they are insulted or "poked holes in". Instead of saying what you just said you could alter it to a question or a less agrressive form. It comes off as if youre challenging the belief and who would want to discuss what they believe with someone whos only intent is to break it down? Not me i just like to know ill ask and be respectful, cause it could all be possible. Could be some alien playing the sims, could be nothing but matter and chance, could be a god, could be greek gods, could be buddha, maybe tom cruise idk, if im totally honest sometimes i think maybe im just on the Truman Show. So who knows?

Avatar image for ianbrettcooper
IanBrettCooper

@someoneelse: Oh dear. Did I trigger you? Did I say things too harshly? Poor baby. Diddums! If religious folks hadn't spent the last few hundred years burning their critics to death, maybe I'd be able to accept your criticism without it striking me as hilarious. Grow up!

Avatar image for Keyrlis
Keyrlis

@ianbrettcooper:

Oh dear. It looks like you were looking for a fight, and got a sincere conversation. Did you feel ashamed that someone offered another point without diminishing your own? Did you jump to conclusions rather than conclude he was arguing logically, AND passionately? :P Sorry, just kidding- Irony over, sincerity now.

Faithlessness is not without its own godless beauty, so you can't assume someone disagreeing with you is a religious nut saying there MUST be a god. The infinities of possibilities allow for anything, however unlikely, to be right until proven otherwise. Even the flying spaghetti monster. Don't blind yourself to any possibility, but in turn, don't bind yourself, either. That is what THEY do, and then call it doctrine.

Peace and smiles, even if they are fake. :)

Avatar image for someoneelse
someoneelse

@ianbrettcooper: no sir not at all. I dont have much of a religious view myself. I just try to help people be respectful when talking about things that are very important to people (religion/faith).

By the way sir i didnt criticize you, so not sure what you have to accept? "Maybe id be able to accept your criticism".

It may be you that needs to grow up, as youre very rude and agrressive over the internet to the point youll attack people over their religious beliefs. That to me seems immature, maybe you should get some faith sir. Regardless of its beliefs on "the end" religion does serve to help people set morales and how to treat one another. To some people thats important and it seems like the whole treat thy neighbor with respect would've done wonders for you. I mean what purpose did your first five sentences serve? Just belittle, insult, and bully your beliefs onto others, yea thats a good way to do it.

Avatar image for RO-nIn187
RO-nIn187

@someoneelse: the problem is most people dont see the harm in putting god in as the answer to things unknown (or even deny scientifically proven facts). but it is harmful and counterproductive to our mental evolution. in order to survive as a species and maybe one day be able to colonize other planets and star systems we have to become one race and work together. if we cant explain something we have to find out the answers with science, not religion. as long as racism, religion and even big cultural differences divide us we are doomed. if we dont kill ourselves there is still a huge risk that life on earth will be wiped out either by a comet some day or at the latest when our sun dies... thats why we need to focus more on space discovery and spreading the human race in the universe.

Avatar image for someoneelse
someoneelse

@RO-nIn187: whos denying scientifically proven facts? What facts? Has science definitively proven their cant be a higher being? We dont even know about aliens and just found out about a nee galaxy a bit ago. We dont have answers and to claim someone elses ideas are wrong when their is no answer seems folly to me.

I also dont think you can claim that we'll only survive and colonize other planets if we work together. Look at how far we've (humanity) come and throughout all of it we have hated each other argued beliefs and battled racism.

Aboloshing our individuality and differences may seem like forward progress but i think its accepting and working with our differences thats the answer. Judging from our past (history) it seems that forcing your beliefs and views on other people and supressing theirs seems to be the wrong choice.

Avatar image for RO-nIn187
RO-nIn187

@someoneelse: what facts? evolution would be a big fact that a lot of religious people deny... some even still believe that the earth is flat! also the creation story is widely accepted... like a talking snake makes more sense than us evolving from "apes"...

how far have we come exactly? we barely scratched the surface. if the dark ages wouldnt have been we could be centuries further with our knowledge (and that is the fault of religion).

the problem with accepting other beliefs is that most religions cant do that, it means going against some of their basic rules. we have to find a common ground and leave the past behind.

the biggest problem is that by believing that some deity created the universe and is used as the answer to things we dont yet understand we lose the drive to find out what is really going on, therefore holding us back...

Avatar image for someoneelse
someoneelse

@RO-nIn187: eh i dont know of any person that denies evolution. Perhaps religious fanatics yes. But ive yet to encounter one. And i only know 1 person that denies the earth being round, kyrie irving. However i think hes messing with the media.

As for losing the drive i think that depends on the individual not the religion. Believing in a deity doesnt mean you wouldnt want to find out more or close yourself off. Maybe not the best example but look at the lady in prometheus. Believing in a creator doesnt mean you have to believe everything in your book blindly. I dont know a christian that TRULY believes the noahs ark thing. You can belive and still seek the answer, in fact it could drive you to find the answer to proof yourself right. This is why i think its more of a individual by individual basis not religion.

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blindbsnake

Science? I think the key word since ME3 is Magic...

Avatar image for deactivated-58bf2c0ad76b2

I think the subject of religious belief is surprisingly under-explored in a lot of science fiction. Several theorists have argued- quite compellingly- that the prevalence of faith across humans is caused by the evolutionary predisposition of our species towards it.

I wonder how other intelligent species would interpreted human iterations of faith against their own, or if they would even possess that concept?

Avatar image for whatsazerg
whatsazerg

@FinalPreator: Humans faith exists because we have a need to know... and because we are still ignorant to a great many things... faith/religion/god is still relevant to many people. As we learn more, and educate ourselves we understand our universe better and no longer have the need to fill in the blank with "god/s"

I have a hard time believing that someone in the time of Mass Effect Andromeda (Humans travelling to another galaxy) that anyone would still believe in a deity.

Avatar image for Keyrlis
Keyrlis

@whatsazerg:

There will always be those that pervert fear of the unknown into control of the ignorant.

Until we as a species know everything there is to know, if that were even possible.

Then we would probably set ourselves up as gods and demand tribute.

Avatar image for Flav333
Flav333

my favorite RPG game is Mass Effect. I will buy this game 100%

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