Here's How Much Money Candy Crush Makes Compared To Fortnite And Pokemon Go On Mobile

Free-to-play games make a lot of money.

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Now Playing: Activision Bought Candy Crush. Should You Care? - The Lobby

While a lot of the talk in gaming, including mobile gaming, today is focused understandably on Fortnite, it is not the biggest money-maker out there, it seems.

Sensor Tower reports that the Candy Crush series of mobile games collectively made more than $1.5 billion in revenue from microtransactions in 2018 across iOS and Android. That works out to a staggering $4.2 million USD spent per day on average.

Candy Crush Saga, the 2012 original game, made $945 million by itself, which is very impressive for a game that is more than six years old. Its $945 million accounted for 63 percent of the total $1.5 billion that people spent on Candy Crush mobile games in 2018.

Twenty-nine percent of spending, or around $443 million, came from Candy Crush Soda Saga. Candy Crush Jelly Saga brought in around $90 million in 2018, which was good for 6 percent of total franchise revenue during the year. The newest Candy Crush game, Candy Crush Friends Saga, made $3 million in 2018 following its October release.

The Candy Crush games collectively added more than 230 million new players in 2018, though a total download figure was not made available.

For comparison, Pokemon Go made around $800 million from its microtransactions in 2018 across iOS and Android, so Candy Crush Saga ($945 million) beats it. Fortnite's mobile edition made $455 million on iOS alone in 2018, but importantly, this figure only covers iOS; what's more, Fortnite's mobile edition only launched in March 2018.

Candy Crush is an Activision franchise, following the Call of Duty company's acquisition of developer King back in 2015 for a staggering $5.9 billion.

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