GeForce Now Price Is Doubling, Nvidia Announces

As the service grows, Nvidia is going to charge you more for the best tier of its service but promises enhancements soon.

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Nvidia is doubling the price for its paid GeForce Now tier, though there is a workaround for this higher fee if you are an existing subscriber.

GeForce Now will retain its two-tier program, with the free tier still giving you access to streaming games that you own but with limitations on how long you can play and no queue priority. That was reserved for the $5 per month Founders Tier, which is being transformed into a new $10 per month Priority Tier.

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What you get from Priority is no different to Founders, however. You'll still get priority when queuing for a space on the server, access to additional horsepower allowing for ray tracing in supported titles, and longer play sessions (from one hour to four) before having to take a break. Nvidia says that this pricing change comes as the company sets new milestones for the service, with aims to include tighter integration into game clients, deploy more servers globally, and more.

The one advantage of being an existing Founders member is that you can continue to pay $5 per month if you don't let your membership lapse, which Nvidia is saying will last for the foreseeable future. But if you decide to take a month's break or if your payment is rejected, the next time you subscribe you'll be charged the new $10 monthly or $100 annual membership fee.

Nvidia says it is working on additional features for the service, including better support for V-Sync that detects the correct frame rate of the display you're playing on. It also hopes to increase its weekly releases from 10 to 15 soon, while also making it easier to launch games from clients like Steam, EA Play, and GOG straight into its cloud service. Games are sometimes removed, however, so you won't necessarily always have access to your entire library.

GeForce Now differs from other streaming services like Google Stadia by requiring you to own the games you stream. This means that your purchases aren't tied to Nvidia's service, letting you play them on local hardware should you want to.

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